Journalist complains about results of his own efforts

Oliver Kamm in March:

Oliver Kamm yesterday:

Well Oliver, perhaps if Times journalists hadn’t spent months trying to impede, thwart, and sabotage the Brexit process then the options on the table would be better.

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36 thoughts on “Journalist complains about results of his own efforts

  1. If May had been a leader with vision she might have asked to join the US in a joint EU trade deal, the conditions applying to all parties. I suspect the bargaining position of the EU would have been somewhere in the bottom of a toilet bowl at that point.

  2. Confirming what most of us have suspected or claimed for some time, journalism has been replaced by political activism. And they wonder why their industry is dying.

  3. I don’t think there is really any space for better options. The hard Brexiteers in the UK have May by the short and curlies, and a hard Brexit is also likely what the EU top dogs want, even if it’s not what the nations want.

    Mr Black, nice idea but: Trump.

    The voters are going to get what they voted for. Good and hard.

  4. It’s not like he has any shame or would see anything in his apparent contradictory statement….it’s how he and his ilk work.

  5. Despite what they think, journalists generally aren’t very bright. If they were they would find something more useful to do with their time.

    Having said that, I did work with one journalist who said as far as she was concerned, she was the only one on my company’s editorial floor who wasn’t harbouring secret dreams of being a great novelist. This, of course, may explain why so many of them make things up as they go.

  6. Interesting observation @Watcher: “Having said that, I did work with one journalist who said as far as she was concerned, she was the only one on my company’s editorial floor who wasn’t harbouring secret dreams of being a great novelist”…

    There are quite a few naff jobs out there that a lot of people only take because actually they want another job entirely, and that hope that if they’re a “jobbing X” for long enough, they’ll eventually become a Y. Electric guitar teacher would join that list, for example.

  7. I read Oliver Kamm and Matthew Parris in The Times every Saturday. They are, reassuringly, virtually always 100% wrong, representing different strands of Metroweenie thought, although Parris at least writes reasonably well.

  8. You have to feel sorry for Matthew Parris, though. If there was ever a man born at the wrong time, it was him. He would have reached cabinet office in the ‘management of decline’ Macmillan or Heath governments, or later during the mismanagement of decline Cameron-May years, but he unfortunately became an MP in the Thatcher years when explaining why any new idea would not work was (briefly) unfashionable.

  9. It’s still not clear to me why a “deal” is necessary at all. Does the EU have a deal with Japan or the US or Canada? Trade will still go on in the absence of a deal, no?

  10. Kamm is jewish, like his colleagues at The Times, Aaronovitch and Finkelstein. Like them, all my Jewish friends are remainers and in favour mass immigration. I’ve tried pointing out that the Fourth Reich is more of a potential threat to Jews than Brexit, but to no avail. They also seem to imagine that a multicultural society will guarantee them safety from persecution, even though I argue that the rise in anti-Semitism is partly motivated by increasingly Islamic influence in the Labour party. The last thing British Jews need is more Islamic immigration.

    These are intelligent entrepreneurial types, all assets to the UK, and from families that have been British for two or more generations. I find their attitudes very odd.

    NB I am not an anti-semite.

  11. Theophrastus – I suppose one could argue that it’s a calculated risk, from the Jewish perspective. On the one hand, a Muslim minority is a threat to the Jews, directly proportional to its size; on the other hand, the Muslims are worse at integrating than the Jews, more fractious, prone to violence, etc., and so will presumably be the natural locus of any gentile racism.

    It’s a flawed plan based on faulty assumptions, so hopefully your Jewish friends’s thinking is relatively (heh) unorthodox.

  12. @Charlie Suet

    Oddly in that piece he agrees with one of the most common eurosceptic positions put forward by economists – that the fact member state governments, rather than the EU itself, hold the levers of fiscal policy, so that large-scale fiscal transfers into regions more badly affected by a crisis cannot take place, leads to greater instability. But he also suggests, despite this flaw, that the harsh medicine that the euro has consequently doled out to Greece has somehow been good for it. Then dismisses the idea that euro membership has anything to do with sovereignty or federalism, even though he’s already identified that to make the currency work in the long term would require a European budget-setting apparatus like wot the Yanks have in Washington DC.

    I’ll give him a piece of credit where it’s due – the euro is indeed still here today, and the eurosceptic alarmists who keep claiming it’s on the brink of collapse have been consistently wrong. Even Greece didn’t leave (though whether they should have done is a different question). But I will have to give a demerit point for his suggestion that Britain might in a generation be the only West European state to stay outside the euro. It’s been a consistently tough sell to Denmark and Sweden, and the idea of joining the EU at all hasn’t been especially popular in Norway – though it’s conceivable it could win a referendum there eventually. Switzerland, Iceland and the Faroes, though, look even less likely to shift into the camp. Does he really think it likely all these countries will be swept up in a wave of europhilia, or has he just forgot some of them even exist?

  13. Watcher,

    “Despite what they think, journalists generally aren’t very bright. If they were they would find something more useful to do with their time.”

    Most of them are just well-connected, well-accented, have some letters after their name (that may be worthless) and are capable of regurgitation. They’ve learnt what the acceptable upper normie opinions are and can repeat them.

    You just have to read things about plastic packaging or Syria or trains. No-one stops to ask why supermarkets use so much plastic packaging. It’s condemned.

  14. @Theo – “NB I am not an anti-semite.”

    You make some valid points but what is concerning is that you need to qualify your points with that statement. British Jews are well represented in the big end of town are left leaning and are active in multiculturalism which is not in question and not necessarily wrong. But why the need to qualify statements like this with that?

    If we post about any minorities confirmed political leanings do we now need to qualify it with an I am not racist/homophobic/sexist/white supremacist/insert minority name, type clarification at the end.

  15. @Charlie Suet on September 22, 2018 at 7:09 pm:

    Kamm is yet another PPE graduate, I believe,

    It’s worth remembering that PPE is the Oxbridge version of “Media Studies”.

  16. @Theophrastus: I have a (distant) relative by marriage who is Jewish. She’s not mad keen on it, but doesn’t have much if anything to do with Christmas, etc, but marches for ‘correct causes’ including unfettered immigration, thinks all muslims including those who come in by back of a lorry are future brain doctors, voted for Khan and generally despises much of her heritage, at least in supporting a potential brother-in-law for her who is utterly pro-Palestine anti-Israel. You might, reasonably, wonder what is going on in her head. But then I am not of her faith who who knows?

    @Bloke on M4: There is an old joke, but true, that you can be a journalist who risks life and limb to go into the world’s shittiest hellholes and report events, or you can be a journalist who sits in an air-conditioned office and re-types press releases about ‘the environment.’

    Both jobs pay the same.

  17. Watcher

    “…thinks all muslims including those who come in by back of a lorry are future brain doctors…”.

    The left-wing self-hating Jew is a type I’ve come across before. What I find so strange is that Jews who’d never vote Labour, are concerned about political correctness, criticise welfare dependency, want to see the UK deficit eliminated and the debt reduced etc…will in almost the same breath denounce Brexit, praise multi-culturalism and argue for more immigration. Odd, to say the least.

  18. @Theophrastus
    @Matthew McConnagay

    I suppose one could argue that it’s a calculated risk, from the Jewish perspective.

    Extrapolating from other specimens, I would say that Kamm does not view it as a “calculated risk, from the Jewish perspective”. He views it from the leftist perspective, which means that he has either convinced himself that there is no risk at all, or believes that even to consider the question is a thought-crime, and his tenderly-nurtured crimestop reflex saves him again and again from having to think about it.

    The western elites are leftist, first and foremost. I’m sure they do contain plenty of Jews, but most of these Jews are leftists, first and foremost, even if they sometimes say “as a Jew” on TV. If a man goes to synagogue, has two sets of forks in the kitchen, and won’t answer the phone on Saturday, you know it means something when he says “as a Jew”. Likewise, if he lives in Israel, speaks Hebrew, and prepares his sons for military service. But a leftist media-personality-type Jew? He can’t say “as a person of colour”, and his grandmother would faint if he said “as a non-binary-queer-femme”, so what’s he going to do? He’s drunk the identity-politics kool-aid, so he needs to say something.

    We’ve got the same type of leftist-Jews in Israel, generally dominating the media and academia. Over here they’re far more conspicuous for their leftism than their Jewishness. The population has swung to the right since the height of the second intifada in 2002, and the elites hate being ignored.

    What gets my knickers in a twist (metaphorically speaking, I hasten to add) is that most complaints about Jewish leftists ignore six million Jews in Israel, who by their actions set precisely the example which right-wing populists are dying to imitate. 90% of Israeli Jews would vote for the policies of AfD, suitably translated. Why do so many people complain about Jewish soyboys in Europe, but never praise men like Netanyahu, or Ariel Sharon (pbuh)? Netanyahu is even capable of giving a decent interview in English, and you get one Israeli politician like that in a generation. I’ve gotten used to reading lists of Islamic Atrocities since 9/11 which never mention a single bombing in Israel, but why do people complain about left-wing Euro-Jews without ever mentioning right-wing Israeli Jews, most of whom are sufficiently right-wing that they cannot be interviewed by BBC-types without sending them into fits of apoplexy?

    @Watcher

    Sounds like a typical specimen to me. Leftist first, everything else second.

  19. Despite his ego Kamm is of zero importance.

    If there is a mess–and there isn’t because WTO Rules is fine–it has been caused by that vile treacherous cow May and her gang.

    If only I could dream and scheme to have them all fired sans compo and pension and have some Judge order the shit beaten out of the entire crew as well.

    It is likely that my dreams/schemes have about as much chance of success as Kamm’s.

    The womiccumalobus cunt.

  20. Jonathan Levy –

    “What gets my knickers in a twist…”

    You answered your own question. Europeans complain about “left-wing Euro Jews” because:

    1. Israeli Jews don’t live in Europe
    2. They can’t speak English
    3. Even if they could, the BBC wouldn’t interview them

    So most Europeans aren’t even aware of Israeli Jews or what they think.

    The only ones who are, are Jews and the alt-right/far-right/whatever, i.e. people who aren’t scared of being called an anti-Semite, which is my second point: most normal people in western countries are, and rightly so – it’s quite the scarlet letter – so better to ignore the whole area.

    (A lot of liberal idiots have trouble even saying the words “Jew”, “Jewish”, “Jewry”; they aren’t sure if it’s racist or not.)

    No matter how phony some western leftist’s Judaism might be, you can be sure they’ll slap on a yarmulke and compare you to Hitler if they think it’ll help win the argument. So when they say “As a Jew, I believe in open borders”, it’s probably not a good idea to point out that Israel’s borders are very much closed.

  21. @Matthew McConnagay

    You make good points, but I still feel there’s something missing.

    So most Europeans aren’t even aware of Israeli Jews or what they think. The only ones who are, are Jews and the alt-right/far-right/whatever.

    Ok, let’s break that down.

    Most Europeans – I can accept that. They’ll think Israel is horrible, and that antisemitism is horrible, because that’s what the msm feeds them. I’m not talking about them, though.

    But there’s a sizeable minority online which no longer trusts the MSM. They don’t accept the narrative, and go looking for answers online. And English-speaking Israeli sources aren’t that hard to find online – there are right-wing national news sites, twitterers like themossadil and brianoflondon, not to mention memri.org. It’s like the only ones who understand that Israelis are also Jews are the ones who imagine all Jews to possess one mind, and that if Jew A in Europe says X and Jew B in Israel says Y, they must be conspiring together to destroy Europe. For all the rest, Israel just doesn’t register when talking about Jews.

    So when they say “As a Jew, I believe in open borders”, it’s probably not a good idea to point out that Israel’s borders are very much closed.

    I don’t know how you resist the temptation. Drop a few names, dress it up in slightly-over-the-top admiration, and cap it off with “I always thought Israel was a light unto the Gentiles”. Watch them choke. Expose them as either deluded fools (if they disparage Israeli policies) or pure hypocrites (if they agree). I prefer the hypocrites, to be honest, because there is still hope for them to see their errors through reason. The true believers are immune to reason, until they or their loved ones get personally mugged by reality.

  22. @J Levy – I was going to make a similar point, that self-hatred is the very core of middle class leftism. It just seems odder in Jews because it’s even more Darwin Awards than for a WASP lefty.

    I’m not sure why the right in Europe doesn’t use Israel as an example, not least as an example of the futility of trying to live in peace with Muzzas. I suspect most just think of David Aaronovitch rather than Netanyahu when they think of Jews in the public eye.

    Also, London is awash with bloody bleeding heart lefties of all ethnicities. I suspect I’ve been lucky to meet a broad range of Jews, including some Israelis, people who served in the IDF and just sensible types with rightist opinions.

  23. MC – “I’m not sure why the right in Europe doesn’t use Israel as an example…” – because they’re terrified of being called Nazis. And it doesn’t matter that the accusation won’t make any sense. When has it ever made sense?

    Levy – I don’t know that the people who don’t trust the BBC, get their news online, etc., are ignoring Israel. Quite the opposite, in fact. Tommy Robinson claimed he was a Zionist, for instance; people are always mentioning how Israel is the only liberal democracy in the middle east; I can think of a couple of very pro-Israel alternative media (mediums?) off the top of my head.

    I do want to highlight one thing:

    “For [non-anti-Semites], Israel just doesn’t register when talking about Jews.”

    Like I said, most people in Europe aren’t talking about Jews at all. Ditto blacks, Asians, feminists, gays, etc., etc. With any of these groups, It’s Not OK to say something bad about them. And since one can’t possibly keep up with what’s good and what’s bad anymore, it’s safest not to say anything. Hence, people get that tightness in their chests if someone broaches such a topic. One minute you’re at a dinner party, the next you’re standing in a minefield in the dark.

    “I don’t know how you resist the temptation.”

    Ha! Sorry, but that’s a bit like being in the trenches with the Bulletproof Man, and he’s wondering why I don’t pop out for a stroll in no man’s land. Why would I risk my livelihood and reputation just to score points against some fool, or some hypocrite?

  24. The left-wing self-hating Jew is a type I’ve come across before. What I find so strange is that Jews who’d never vote Labour, are concerned about political correctness, criticise welfare dependency, want to see the UK deficit eliminated and the debt reduced etc…will in almost the same breath denounce Brexit, praise multi-culturalism and argue for more immigration.

    I’ve noticed this, too.

    I’ve also noticed that a lot of American and British Jews claim to embrace multiculturalism yet never marry non-Jews. When I asked a Jewish friend of mine why, if she thinks population mixing is such a great idea, she married a Jewish man she said it was mere coincidence. She’s also raising her children Jewish so she doesn’t disappoint her father, and lives in the same Jewish neighbourhood in which she was raised. Multicultural, indeed.

  25. @MC

    self-hatred is the very core of middle class leftism

    That’s exactly the problem, isn’t it?

    @Matthew McConnagay

    because they’re terrified of being called Nazis

    … really?

    I guess I was assuming playing the ‘Go Israel’ card would grant you temporary immunity from that, especially when facing a (leftist) Jew.

    Has it really gone from:

    1938:
    A: Kill the Jews!
    B: Oh, he’s just a Nazi.

    to:

    2018:
    A: Imitate the Jews!
    B: NAZI!!!

    ?

    I guess my question reflects my distance from the events, or the weakness of my imagination. I just can’t wrap my head around it.

    One minute you’re at a dinner party, the next you’re standing in a minefield in the dark.

    To be fair, I thought all British dinner parties were like this, irrespective of Political Correctness (“What fried cauliflower, my dear? These are sauteed.”)

    Sorry, but that’s a bit like being in the trenches with the Bulletproof Man, and he’s wondering why I don’t pop out for a stroll in no man’s land.

    Yes. Well, you certainly have put it in perspective! I was thinking… well, I already explained that a few lines above.

  26. @Tim
    Multicultural, indeed.

    There’s another side to that coin, Tim – you’ve never seen the difficulties British Jews have getting used to living in Israel. They are very British, indeed, and the local semi-levantine attitude to things like queuing drives them mad, to say nothing of the Israeli penchant for ultra-direct speech. And then they have to send their children into the public school system, and watch them go native (shudder).

  27. There’s another side to that coin, Tim – you’ve never seen the difficulties British Jews have getting used to living in Israel.

    Ah, I have: my friend’s sister went to Israel and high-tailed it back o London after about two minutes. Israel is Middle Eastern, after all.

  28. Just to keep things festive, here’s a link to a very politically-incorrect review of one of the recent Star Wars films.

    Heh.

  29. Has it really gone from:

    1938:
    A: Kill the Jews!
    B: Oh, he’s just a Nazi.

    to:

    2018:
    A: Imitate the Jews!
    B: NAZI!!!

    It pretty much has! I would just replace the phrase “Imitate the Jews!” with “[literally anything]”.

    Like I said to the other bloke, the accusation of anti-Semitism, or racism, or sexism, or whatever, doesn’t have to make sense, and in fact it rarely does. But it’s still damaging.

    Look at this fuss over Kavanaugh in America: all the allegations put forth against him so far are patently absurd, but they still might cost him a job. And since millions of idiots will believe it, his reputation is tarnished as well.

    I should make clear, the creating of this minefield was a left-wing thing, not a Jewish thing. I’m not positing some nefarious plot of the Elders of Zion.

    I’m just saying, the fact that one of those landmines is labelled “Jews” – the fact that people are reticent to talk about Jews – has the side-effect that that they won’t learn anything about Jews. Hence the ignorance about Israel that you mentioned.

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