A Coup and a Coverup

There are two things to say about this story:

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says a landmark nuclear deal with Iran was “built on lies”, after Israel claimed to have proof of a secret Iranian nuclear weapons programme.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu on Monday accused Iran of conducting a secret nuclear weapons programme, dubbed Project Amad, and said it had continued to pursue nuclear weapons knowledge after the project was shuttered in 2003.

Mr Netanyahu presented what he said was evidence of thousands of “secret nuclear files” that showed Iran had lied about its nuclear ambitions before the deal was signed in 2015.

Mr Pompeo said documents revealed by Israel’s prime minister were authentic.

Now I’ve had to pull the above quotes from all over the article and re-arrange the order. The above is the story, but the BBC has crafted the article so as to mislead as much as possible, with the third paragraph reading:

Analysts say they show nothing new, highlighting that concerns over Iran’s nuclear ambitions led to the 2015 deal.

Which analysts? The BBC doesn’t say, but they do quote the Iranian foreign minister. Similarly, the US media, if they’re covering it at all, is full of former employees of the Obama adminstration playing it down. Why would that be then? For the same reason they refused to cover the protests in Iran which took place last December: Barack Obama made a ludicrously bad deal with Iran which involved exchanging pallets of cash dollars worth over a billion in return for vague promises about shelving their nuclear ambitions. The deal was so bad Obama did it unilaterally, thus avoiding Congress who would point out the money will almost certainly be used to fund war and terrorism against US allies. The media however lapped it up, and now it’s looking likely that Iran is cheating – as if anyone sane believed they wouldn’t – they can’t bring themselves to criticise what was lauded as a central plank of Obama’s legacy (the disastrous Obamacare and sucking up to the Castros being the others). The BBC ensures to tell us early on:

Other Western powers, including signatories Britain and France, say Iran has been abiding by the deal and it should be kept.

Well, yes. European countries are slavering at the bit to get their national champions into Iran, probably the last semi-advanced nation which remains out of bounds to them. They couldn’t give a stuff about Middle East security or terrorism, provided they can flog their goods and services in a country where Americans are detested. A more cynical approach to nuclear security couldn’t be imagined, and I dearly hope Trump pulls the plug on the whole deal just so I can see these companies – all of whom have self-righteous ethics policies littering their websites – are forced to abandon their plans or run the risk of falling foul of the US Department of Justice.

The other interesting part of the story is this:

Benjamin Netanyahu told reporters on Monday that Israel’s intelligence agency Mossad had obtained 55,000 pages of evidence and a further 55,000 files on 183 CDs relating to Project Amad.

A senior Israeli official told the New York Times that the agency first discovered the warehouse in southern Tehran in February 2016, and put the building under surveillance.

In January, intelligence agents managed to break into the property in the middle of the night, remove the original documents and smuggle them back into Israel the same night, the official told the paper.

Whatever you think of Israel, that is one hell of an operation by Mossad, and worthy of being made into a film. The only way they could have made it better is if they’d replaced the documents with copies of Obama’s sealed university thesis.

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26 thoughts on “A Coup and a Coverup

  1. …that is one hell of an operation cover story by Mossad…

    FIFY. Iranian counter-intelligence is gonna have a busy few months crawling up the arse of everyone even remotely connected to the program to find out who talked.

  2. The Mossad moves in mysterious ways!

    And

    #IbelieveBenjaminNetanyahu

  3. Iranian counter-intelligence is gonna have a busy few months crawling up the arse of everyone even remotely connected to the program to find out who talked.

    Yeah, there’s a very good chance Mossad simply identified people fed up with the regime and worked them into handing this stuff over. It’s hard to believe they pulled it off without help from the inside. Regardless, it’s one hell of a coup.

  4. Regardless, it’s one hell of a coup.

    Oh, I agree wholeheartedly. Trebles all round!

  5. Perhaps Mossad could be induced to do some research on Obama’s past? Not to mention Clinton’s?

  6. Heh. My place are champing at the bit to get into Iran. They keep trying to send me there.

    It’s a fertile hunting ground, as many many competitors took payment for work that was never delivered when the sanctions came in, and are now blacklisted by the likes of NITC and so on.

  7. Disregarding all the mossad stories and legends the Israelis are rather good aren’t they? Another rare example of a country whose govt works for the people and not foreign interests, how novel, perhaps we should try it.

  8. Another rare example of a country whose govt works for the people and not foreign interests, how novel, perhaps we should try it.

    As the ZMan recently put it: Israel is a serious country; it has to be.

  9. Tim, you’ve got to learn about using google. Especially if you complain about the BBC sloppy work not providing sources. Plenty out there which discusses how the recent presentation is nothing new with nearly all of it covered by the previous IAEA report from a couple of years ago.

    A quick search throws this up

    http://foreignpolicy.com/2018/05/01/netanyahus-informercial-for-the-iran-deal/

    I’m sure there are plenty more out there for you to find. I’m surprised you haven’t looked considering what you had to say about being fooled the first time round about Iraq’s WMD’s (like many of us were).

  10. You might want to look at your third paragraph (not the quotes) where you wrote “full of former employees of the Obama illustration playing it down”.

    I know O’bummer is a bit of a caricature but that’s a bit too far! >};o)

  11. Plenty out there which discusses how the recent presentation is nothing new with nearly all of it covered by the previous IAEA report from a couple of years ago.

    This might be true, but it would be more convincing if:

    1. The people saying this weren’t Obama administration officials or others with a vested interest in the deal remaining.
    2. Other people in the Obama administration weren’t saying the Israelis have fabricated the evidence. Which is it?

    It seems unlikely Mossad would pull off an operation like this in order to reveal to the world what everyone knew already. It seems a lot more likely people are falling over themselves to protect Obama’s legacy, and their own roles, using any means necessary.

  12. You might want to look at your third paragraph (not the quotes) where you wrote “full of former employees of the Obama illustration playing it down”.

    Oof, corrected, thanks.

  13. The BBC and their endless anonymous ‘analysts’. Year after year they power BBC news stories.

    Harsh, these days they use Twitter comments too.

  14. “I dearly hope Trump pulls the plug on the whole deal just so I can see these companies”

    Total being one of them?

    Boeing probably have the most to lose.

    Good for oil prices and the Aramco IPO and good for China and Russia stepping in to take up supply of goods and services to Iran.

    “that is one hell of an operation by Mossad, and worthy of being made into a film”

    It could be a little too far fetched even for Holywood.

  15. Any website that declares it is presenting ‘the truth’, which the BBC does these days, can be assumed to be ‘spinning’.

  16. Love the last paragraph! Perhaps they could have replaced the CDs with a copy from their files of all Shrill’s missing emails as well?

  17. Good for oil prices and the Aramco IPO and good for China and Russia stepping in to take up supply of goods and services to Iran.

    China and Russia tried “stepping in” on multiple occasions, to little avail. Iran is a hard country to do business in regardless of sanctions, as a Chinese oil company found out some years back when it bailed on one of the South Pars expansions after getting bogged down in nonsense with the project going nowhere. I’m pretty sure a lot of these European companies will struggle too, if they ever make it that far.

  18. “The only way they could have made it better is if they’d replaced the documents with copies of Obama’s sealed university thesis.”

    If the warehouse is now empty…
    .
    .
    .
    then maybe they did. 🙂

  19. Needless to say that the deal was largely brokered by those paragons of competence and accountability: HR Clinton, J Kerry and Cathy “Margaret Beckett’s Stunt Double” Ashworth.

    And people seriously believe that the Iranians weren’t holding crossed fingers behind their backs while dealing with this Brains Trust ?

  20. “China and Russia tried “stepping in” on multiple occasions, to little avail.”

    Not saying that it would be easy just that there is a huge unsatisfied economic demand emanating from Iran. I think though if the US “snaps back” on the deal then the landscape would change drastically. In theory the other signatories could continue with the agreement as it provides for, but it is doubtful if the Europeans would as they have been quite vociferous in complaining about the Iranian ballistic program. Anyone with knowledge of the agreement knows that there is no restriction to the Iranian ballistic program other than it is not designed for nuclear warheads, yes they were outlawed before the current agreement, but that resolution was terminated with this agreement. I doubt very much that behind the scenes there’s misalignment between the US and the Europeans when it comes to Iran.

    So a crashed agreement, massive unmet economic demand, huge anti-American sentiment and this being with the normal Iranians that just want to better their lives would play right into the opening up of further investment and business opportunities and polarization towards China and Russia, ala One Belt One Road. The persians that once ran an empire cannot remain in the stone age indefinitely, the hidden hand of the market will apply.

    Thinking about it further it would also be advantageous to the US as arms build up rate would increase if the agreement fails, oil price up, divide and conquer strategy in place.

  21. Not saying that it would be easy just that there is a huge unsatisfied economic demand emanating from Iran.

    You miss my point: Iran has been off limits to US companies and, to a lesser extent but still substantial, to European countries since 1979. During this time Russia and China have had every opportunity to step in and clean up yet they haven’t, mainly because doing so is extremely difficult. I hardly think they’re waiting in the wings to do so now because a deal signed in 2015 is now on the rocks.

  22. I understand your point, but I am saying that the landscape will change significantly if the US were to snap back on the deal, there is a lot riding on this and no deal will represent a major turning point for the Iranians and their future direction. The US has stated that China and then Russia as its biggest threat and terrorism is now off their radar. China and Russia are as close as they have ever been, China now has huge and increasing economic power and has been making inroads westwards through unparalleled investment far higher than anything the US could do, Russia has now established military supremacy in Syria and Iran is slap bang in the middle of the pivot region. Iran has reformed politically and its citizens have carried huge expectations for economic better times on the back of this agreement. If the US reneges which is how it will be seen by the Iranian people then they will turn their back on the West in disgust and yes China and Russia will be more than happy to come to their assistance.

    Iran must grow, it needs it planes, trains, automobiles, roads, bridges, sewer, water supply, consumable goods and everything else that the West already has and the best bit is that there are huge profits to be made for those that will bring these things to them

  23. I understand your point, but I am saying that the landscape will change significantly if the US were to snap back on the deal

    I think it’ll snap back no further than to 2015, which raises the question why the Russians and Chinese weren’t making hay in Iran between 1979 and then. Yes, the geopolitical situation has changed a little in that worthless Syria is now a Russian/Iranian proxy, but I don’t see much has changed in the relations – either economic or political – between Russia, China, and Iran since 2015.

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