Weather Girls

I’ve written before about the racket which is wealthy, middle class white people living on the taxpayer dime in expensive western cities demanding Africans change their ways. Today I stumbled across this rubbish from the World Economic Forum:

With the 2030 deadline for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals approaching, the fight against climate change intensifies each year, with governments pumping resources into achieving them.

In the film Pacific Rim, the world’s governments pooled their resources in order to counter the threat of monsters emerging from the Earth’s core by building enormous robots to punch them in the face. That plan seems half-sane compared to what our current rulers are attempting.

One of the most critical SDGs is SDG 5, achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls, because…

…it’s the only one offering a career for a dimwit with a Gender Studies degree?

…it will have positive cascading effects on the achievement of the other SDGs, including quality education, poverty alleviation, clean energy, reduced inequalities, good health and wellbeing, zero hunger, clean water and sanitation, decent work and economic growth and most importantly, climate action.

Apparently if we let women out of the dungeons they currently languish in, pretty much every problem facing mankind will be solved. Oddly, this doesn’t quite mesh with the fact that American women are about as liberated as it’s possible to be while America is held up as being a despairing pit of inequality and the world’s biggest polluter. So maybe we should hold off unlocking the manacles until we’ve figured out what the relationship is?

We are already seeing some of the devastating effects of climate change, with increasing floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters.

As they say in Wikipedia, citation needed.

Women are the most vulnerable in these situations, facing the maximum risk due to their socio-economic status.

I think they’re talking about women in Florida whose husbands own yachts.

With 70% living in poverty, women are disproportionately affected by extreme weather events, loss of agricultural productivity, destruction of life and property and so on, all of which stem from the climate crisis.

Unless these women are living alone – not a feature of those trapped in grinding poverty – then it’s hard to see how losing a house is worse for a woman than a man, unless he just schleps off down the pub and lives there until she’s rebuilt it. And destruction of life? Does that not really affect men, then?

Women also have the knowledge and understanding of what is needed to adapt to changing environmental circumstances in order to determine practical solutions.

They do? Then why the need to do anything?

But women remain a largely untapped resource due to existing biases, including restricted land rights, lack of access to training, technology and financial resources, and limited access to political decision making due to under representation.

Is she describing medieval Europe here?

For practical and effective climate change mitigation, we must unleash the knowledge and capability of women.

Yeah, I’m not sure what’s holding them back in the USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, German, France, the Netherlands, Norway…(cont’d page 94).

To find sustainable solutions, it is critical to recognize the important contributions of women as decision makers, caretakers, stakeholders, experts and educators across all sectors.

A minute ago women were an untapped reserve thanks to the patriarchy standing on their necks. Now we must recognise their important contributions to world affairs. Which is it?

Greta Thunberg, Christina Figueres and Franny Armstrong, to name a few, are already leading the way in not only climate change advocacy but also in crafting sustainable, long-term solutions.

I don’t know who the latter two are, but Greta Thunberg’s solution is about as sustainable as her act of looking twelve.

According to McKinsey, in a “full potential” scenario in which women play an identical role in labour markets to men, as much as $28 trillion, or 26%, could be added to global annual GDP by 2025.

Has anyone asked women if they want to play an identical role as men in the labour market which, in case the geniuses at McKinsey have forgotten, includes working in sewer pipes and hanging off power lines?

This is more than enough to bridge the climate finance gap needed to fund the battle against climate change, which stands at €530 billion ($585 billion) per year by 2020 and €810 billion ($894 billion) by 2030.

So women are to be put to work in their millions in order to pay for the costs of climate change legislation. Apparently this is good news for women.

Just increasing the participation of women in the labour force will sufficiently increase the world’s GDP for financing sustainable development.

At the expense of the birth rate, which will leave that word “sustainable” looking rather forlorn.

One of the most potent tools for increasing the effectiveness of women in climate change mitigation is renewable energy, which can help transform the lives of women by improving their health, providing them with better livelihood prospects, improving their education opportunities and more.

Increasing the cost of energy improves the lives of the world’s poorest, apparently.

In fact, it offers women many entrepreneurial avenues for further deployment of renewable energy, which in turn mitigates carbon emissions.

So it’s not the structure of the host society which is preventing women becoming good little worker bees, but a lack of electricity?

And rural women will be the primary beneficiaries. Looking at examples such as Solar Sister in Africa, renewable energy increases women’s relevance in society, shields them from harmful health effects of indoor pollution (through burning of biomass)…

One of the biggest problems in Africa is the lack of reliable electricity coupled with the fact it gets dark around 7pm, after which there isn’t a whole lot to do but get busy making more kids. What is desperately needed to improve the lives of African women is cheap, reliable power 24/7 from a traditional grid. Solar power isn’t going to do anything to help without a storage system that has yet to be invented, and this nonsense is going to prevent a proper power station being built.

…and makes them agents of climate change mitigation through their involvement in renewable energy deployment.

I’m not sure being handed shiny trinkets is historically very empowering for natives, even if they come in the form of solar panels.

The World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Report 2013 found “a nation’s competitiveness in the long term depends significantly on whether and how it educates and utilizes its women” and whether they have “the same rights, responsibilities and opportunities as men.”

Which explains why the Soviet Union outperformed Japan.

Women bring more empathy and inclusiveness in their advocacy and problem-solving, which enhances their efficacy as sustainability leaders.

If women are naturally better at problem solving, why does it need supranational organisations to promote them? Surely the results would speak for themselves. I mean, no organisation ever got set up to persuade people that women are pretty good at raising kids, did it?

Whether it’s tribal women in Udaipur, Rajasthan, becoming green entrepreneurs, or Barefoot College in Rajasthan creating female solar engineers, or women-led self-help groups in Trichy, Tamil Nadu, mobilizing funds for water and sanitation (important components of sustainability), there are examples of women everywhere leading the way to a sustainable future.

All under the watchful eye of well-paid white folk living as expats in Geneva. Kerr-ching!

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25 thoughts on “Weather Girls

  1. I met someone from Nesta this weekend. I thought they were a think-tank devoted to innovation and crazy ideas that would struggle to get funding (which must be truly crazy given what silicon valley is happy to fund). They were given a quarter of a billion pounds to set them up.

    The website still talks about innovation. Internally it is all about lecturing other countries on how to promote equality. The rot is deeper than you think.

  2. Until now third world women were sitting around guzzling liqueur chocolates and watching Love Island, so they must be dragooned into the official workforce so they can be taxed. Who’ll look after the children and the family cow? Who cares, it’s GDP, GDP and nothing but GDP, comrades.
    Apart from the economic imbecility it’s the flagrant misogyny that grates most.

  3. Solar power isn’t going to do anything to help without a storage system that has yet to be invented

    It won’t power a western-style electricity grid, but if your light source is candles or a dung fire, a small solar array with an intelligent battery can power LED lighting for a village, plus running a fridge to store perishable drugs. That’s what a small outfit near me has been installing in ‘off-grid’ places across Africa.

    PV works much better in Africa than in northern Europe, it might even give a positive EROEI 🙂

  4. Back in the bad old days, the usual suspects could with a straight face make arguments like the above about the world being a better place if women played a larger role in politics & business. Now that we have seen women leaders drive companies into the ditch (eg Hewlett-Packard, General Motors) and entire countries into the swamp (thank you Mrs. May, Mrs Merkel), the argument does not sit so well.

    Since the rich white girls are focusing here on Africa, it is worth remembering the comment a UK film critic made long ago about Richard Roundtree’s performance in the movie “Shaft in Africa”:
    ‘Richard Roundtree reminds us that the average black actor is like the average white actor — average’.

    All power to those women who have the drive of Catherine the Great or the intelligence of Marie Curie — but I suspect that film critic’s observation applies just as strongly to women.

  5. We are already seeing some of the devastating effects of climate change, with increasing floods, hurricanes and other natural disasters.

    Really? I’ll leave this here (you can follow the links for the sources of the data):

    http://thesilicongraybeard.blogspot.com/2019/09/pass-this-on-if-you-do-social-media.html

    It seems to me that for various reasons, admittedly not all related to climate events (advanced warnings due to satellite imagery and early evacuation from hurricanes for example) the number of people dying of weather related events is declining sharply.

    But never let facts get in the way of an emotional appeal.

  6. A few years ago the rural roads department installed flashing solar powered lights at sharp bends even though the people that used these roads knew perfectly well where the bends were. Well, tropical county, bags of sunlight, they worked well. For about two years. Then they started going out and now they’re all dark. So solar power, fuck yeah.

  7. “One of the biggest problems in Africa is the lack of reliable electricity coupled with the fact it gets dark around 7pm”

    One of the fundamental conceits of these aid type people, and I’ve had plenty of exposure to them, is they can only view their clientele in the most patronising ways. They see a solar panel that allows a ‘native’ to charge a phone in their hut as a good. The idea of them moving to a city, getting employment and training in industry and then demanding the same western goods as the aid giver takes for granted as very bad indeed.

    “All under the watchful eye of well-paid white folk living as expats in Geneva.”

    This is the true sustainability goal. Those jobs must be sustained at all costs.

  8. The solar power mis-selling scandal I think is just beginning here.

    Smug, avaricious cretin goes “green”. Gets these stupid things on his roof and claims the bung which was never, of course, anything other than a totally fortuitous windfall to his saving the planet.

    A few years down the line, the output of the junk has dropped so he can’t claim so much “feed in” tariff. Having borrowed thousands on the promise of said “feed in” wants the foul running dogs of capitalism brought to justice.

    The Chinese manufacturer may as well be on Mars. Meerkat solar has gone bust, Stefan and Bogdan having trousered the cash and fucked off back to Lithuania. Smug, avaricious cretin has a problem, and one that brings joy to my black heart.

    Just wait until they finally get their Tossler milk floats. Now there is a mis-selling scandal that will make the above look like a hair shirt!

    Well I’ll charge it at home for free, Bwahahahahahaha!

    On a serious note though, I know people who have the green disease so bad nothing, absolutely nothing will ever convince them. It will be entertaining in the coming years watching though.

    A wammen led, “green” revolution? You go grlllllll!

  9. Maybe it would be easier to just pay hackers to keep changing the webpage of organisations like “UN Women” and “Nesta” (who the f*ck they are) to show a blank, white webpage with nothing but bold,centred text in a huge font:

    Islam is RIGHT about women

    https://www.spiked-online.com/2019/09/26/the-genius-of-the-islam-is-right-about-women-stunt/

    Any genuine examination of sex inequality and poverty with Islam (even the pockets where it exists in the West from Bradford,UK to Minneapolis,USA), will find a pretty high correlation, but clearly no “Right thinking” (i.e. leftist) research organisation is going to do that because “muh racism”.

    Clearly, for even suggesting this, I am a racist, a bigot and probably a Nazi. Must remember to tell that to my French boyfriend.

  10. Aren’t the geniuses at McKinsey the kind of geniuses who think you are either a management consultant (ideally at McKinsey) or a cost factor that needs to be downsized?

  11. Aren’t the geniuses at McKinsey the kind of geniuses who think you are either a management consultant (but only if you work for McKinsey) or a cost factor that needs to be downsized?

    Fixed that for you @BiG

  12. These people can never grasp dependencies. The reason we got a lot more women in work is that we saved on labour costs in the home.

    It’s one of the most hilarious things about Guardian people. How they’re all back to the stone age eco warriors but also feminists. They can’t seem to grasp the past 50 years of history across the globe where feminism has thrived because of technology.

  13. With 70% living in poverty, women are disproportionately affected by extreme weather events…

    …why are there no charity shops where one can donate pretty umbrellas and pink wellies?

  14. I was under the impression that the increased uptake of women in the workforce in the West, particularly in more senior positions, occurred concurrently with a rise in assortative mating, with the result that relative inequality has increased.

    So I question the assertion that better education in the third world will reduce inequality.

  15. Franny Armstrong is the kind, caring, co-operative, genius (add your own dubious feminist platitude apparently applicable to all wammen) filmmaker who thought that the best way to address any questioning of the climate orthodoxy by schoolchildren was to blow them up.

    Lest we forget:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfnddMpzPsM

    Haven’t heard much of her since.

  16. “One of the most potent tools for increasing the effectiveness of women in climate change mitigation is renewable energy, which can help transform the lives of women by improving their health, providing them with better livelihood prospects, improving their education opportunities and more.”
    I like that idea. We should be harnessing women’s power. Harness them to treadmills & give them a book to read while they trudge.
    I like firm muscled thighs on my women.

  17. “All under the watchful eye of well-paid white folk living as expats in Geneva.”

    Be fair, Tim. The author of this screed looks out over the Hudson River, not Lake Geneva, when she’s not touching base in Bombay – which will explain the extremely pale version of Brahmin beige in her colouring.

  18. Much of Prince Harry’s comment on his Africa trip seemed to be that the locals were not running the place in a manner of which he approved.
    Take up the White Man’s burden, Harry. Bit out of fashion though.

    So much of this first world ‘charitable’ aid seems to be an excuse for pampered non-jobs and thinly disguised racism, previously called empire.
    Sigh.
    A couple of excellent novels by Doug Casey and John Hunt (Speculator, Drug Lord) portray the damage this meddling does on the genuine enterprises struggling to emerge, before being squashed by some ignorant – evil – “aid”.

  19. “it will have positive cascading effects on the achievement of the other SDGs, including quality education, poverty alleviation, clean energy, reduced inequalities, good health and wellbeing, zero hunger, clean water and sanitation, decent work and economic growth and most importantly, climate action.”

    This is one of the things that really, really, bugs me about modern development mantras.

    “One of the most critical SDGs is SDG 5, achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls, because”

    The gender equality is a *result* of the economic development. A society that depends upon human and animal power will have the men doing the paid work and the women doing the scut.

    Only when human physique isn’t the determinant of earnings can we have gender equality in the workplace.

    So too with education. If the average woman needs to be pregnant or lactating all her adult life in order to maintain the population – something that was true in near all places only 200 years ago, many only 50 and very few today – then what’s the damn point of educating the incubators?

    When children are a nice add on to life, not the all consuming point of it, then women will be educated. As they are everywhere it has happened.

    It’s the economic development that comes first. Everything else- including that gender equality but also clean water, decent work, climate action etc – comes after that, stems from it.

  20. With 70% living in poverty, women are disproportionately affected by extreme weather events, loss of agricultural productivity, destruction of life and property and so on, all of which stem from the climate crisis.

    Women have always been the primary victims of war. They lose their husbands, fathers, brothers…
    -H.Clinton

  21. renewable energy, which can help transform the lives of women by … improving their education opportunities and more.

    So you can set up a little windmill with wind driving one end and educational opportunities coming out the other! Who knew?

  22. “In the film Pacific Rim, the world’s governments pooled their resources in order to counter the threat of monsters emerging from the Earth’s core by building enormous robots to punch them in the face. That plan seems half-sane compared to what our current rulers are attempting.”

    I mean, if you’re going to waste money on *something*, giant robots to punch ‘climate change’ would at least get you giant robots . . . uh, scratch that – cool concept art of giant robots.

    “If women are naturally better at problem solving . . .”

    Then surely they would have solved the problems that the writer claims prevents women from solving the problems.

  23. Mark said:

    Smug, avaricious cretin goes “green”. Gets these stupid things on his roof and claims the bung which was never, of course, anything other than a totally fortuitous windfall to his saving the planet.

    A few years down the line, the output of the junk has dropped so he can’t claim so much “feed in” tariff. Having borrowed thousands on the promise of said “feed in” wants the foul running dogs of capitalism brought to justice.

    The Chinese manufacturer may as well be on Mars. Meerkat solar has gone bust, Stefan and Bogdan having trousered the cash and fucked off back to Lithuania. Smug, avaricious cretin has a problem, and one that brings joy to my black heart

    Darn tootin’!
    Especially those smug avaricious cretins that signed up early on and were guaranteed ridiculous unit prices – something like 48p/kWh – for the energy they generate* for 25 years. The hardware they installed will now be degrading in efficiency, and the inverters will be wearing out.

    I’ll be mega pissed if taxpayers end up compensating any of these people.

    *a lot of people have the misconception that solar panel owners are only getting paid for energy sold back to the grid**. If this was the case then panels would have been economical for hardly anyone. The “generation tariff” is paid for units generated, even if that energy is being used by the home (it might be 75% of units generated – it’s a long time since I looked at this). And the cost of this? Added to everyone else’s bills.

    **An additional amount is paid for units fed back to the grid – somewhere in the order of 10p/kWh.

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