PC Comics

A reader sends me this from a comic book convention in London:

It appears Dennis the Menace, Minnie the Minx, or Beryl the Peril wouldn’t even get through the door of this particular comic convention. But it’s good to know the organisers take a robust stand against physical assault and battery, which lesser conventions presumably allow to occur unimpeded. I’m disappointed they appear reluctant to disavow murder and kidnapping, though. Then again, they reserve the right to take action in “any form they deem appropriate” so maybe they didn’t want to limit their options.

And thank heavens someone is on the lookout for bathroom policing in relation to citizenship: no longer will comic book fans have to swipe their passport just to access the clean toilets.  Readers who understand the difference between “inappropriate physical contact” and “unwelcome physical attention” or “gender identity” and “gender presentation” are welcome to leave explanations in the comments.

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22 thoughts on “PC Comics

  1. “Readers who understand the difference between “inappropriate physical contact” and “unwelcome physical attention” or “gender identity” and “gender presentation” are welcome to leave explanations in the comments.”

    I may be out of date on this one, but I think “gender identity” is when you peek down your trousers to check, and “gender presentation” is when you get it out in public.

  2. I may be out of date on this one, but I think “gender identity” is when you peek down your trousers to check, and “gender presentation” is when you get it out in public.

    Lol

  3. Presumably “gender identity” is what you think you are and “gender presentation” is how you might appear. Picture a trans person who didn’t bother to shave.
    (Rather like my response identified as funny, but, compared to Sam Vara’s, it didn’t present as such.)

  4. Is it called Comic Con to reflect the fact that comic fans have been comprehensively ripped off with 50 years of tedious, derivative, wish-fulfilment rubbish?

    Apart from 2000AD, which I did read when I was a kid and it had more ideas in one issue than Stan Lee ever had. Don’t know if it is still going though.

  5. On the lower list they have citizenship / national origin / race – seems a bit OTT.

    Citizenship seems especially odd as how are you going to know this?!?

  6. Seems a robust and responsible approach to making sure the convention is a fun environment for everyone attending. Great to see.

  7. I just don’t get it ; Why do adults read comics ? What’s with all these superhero movies ? Bores my balls off. On par with most pop music – repetitive and trite. Are these people the same ‘adults’ who still dress (and behave) like teenagers ?

  8. @MC

    I liked “Commando”

    Numskulls still good

    .
    @Walter Egon

    Some bores me too; your fun may not be mine, mine may not be yours

    Fun for me is avg speed >100mph bike ride and goth meets.

    Live & Let live

  9. Email exchange on a Linux local group with monthly meets/talks:

    I disagree – if problems ever do come up, then having something a little bit more detailed written down about what’s
    expected will be invaluable. People would disagree on what counts as “being an arse”, and it’s easy for it to mean “the
    decision makers’ mates are OK”. The ‘judge, jury and executioner’ problem makes it more important to have some written
    guidelines, not less.

    Hopefully we’ll never have an issue with anyone’s conduct at EdLUG meetings. But it doesn’t cost us anything to have a
    code of conduct there in case it does come up.

    Thomas

    On Sun, May 26, 2019, at 9:32 PM, Colin xxxx wrote:
    > Why?
    >
    > Can’t we just stick to the “don’t be an arse” rule? Codification of this kinda stuff just causes problems.
    >
    > The ppl incharge still are judge jurorly and executioner in most small groups any how.
    >
    > BB
    > Hodge
    >
    > On Fri, 24 May 2019, 12:28 Tai xxxx wrote:
    >> Hello everybody,
    >>
    >> I’ve put together a Code of Conduct text, to be added to the website
    >>

    @Colin +1

    Anyone care to draft a “No, a ‘Code of Conduct’ will empower PC prodnoses/bureaucrats and destroy our informal shared interest group”

    Thanks

  10. The YouTube channel Diversity in Comics has been chronicling the accelerating self-destruction of Marvel Comics into unprofitable wokeness. DC is mostly just making sub-par publishing and creative decisions.

    I managed to invoke massive cognitive dissonance in a friend by pointing out that superhero comics had become everything Frederic Wertham claimed they were in the 1950s.

  11. Gender presentation is easy – this is dress-up, don’t forget, so gender presentation and identity are at odds during the event for a large proportion of people. Good, uh, friend of mine is entirely female and does the cosplay stuff as male characters because they suit her tall and skinny frame more than the oversexed female superhero or lolita kit.

    Having run (not cosplay) conferences for the last several years, I can understand the need for a T&C. We only ever had to throw one boor out (from cumulatively tens of thousands of delegates) but the fun events are cheap and attract weirdos in droves (apart from the ones who actually enjoy the dressup, I mean). Professional conferences are expensive and attract fewer hecklers. The easier it is to kick out those obviously there to take the piss the better, and people are perfectly at liberty, at a private function, to exclude those who are spoiling the fun. “Don’t be an arse” is fine but there is a group size at which it stops working adequately.*

    Stop being so down on other peoples’ fun because it isn’t your fun. I thought there were more classical liberals here.

    *: Also why every country’s statute book is longer than “Don’t be an arse”.

  12. Apart from 2000AD, which I did read when I was a kid and it had more ideas in one issue than Stan Lee ever had.

    2000AD in the late ’80s and early ’90s was brilliant, but I think it went downhill along with everything else.

    I loved the Victor Book for Boys annuals from the ’70s and ’80s too. They’d be banned from bookshelves these days.

  13. Stop being so down on other peoples’ fun because it isn’t your fun. I thought there were more classical liberals here.

    It’s more the rank amateurism I’m mocking, not the event itself. I’ve found the less serious an organisation the more draconian and amateur-looking its code of conduct is. It smacks of something crafted by people who have never held authority before and, unless you include this, never will and are making the most of it. Student groups are particularly good at this.

  14. They look like a pretty serious outfit from their website, but almost certainly started as a club. These things are typically geek-run, but hire an event management company to do the heavy lifting. This company looks big enough to run its own shows now.

  15. As a boy, in the late 50’s and early 60’s, I used my paper round money to buy ‘The Wizard’ and ‘Adventure’ comics on a Tuesday and ‘Rover’ and ‘Hotspur’ on a Thursday. At that time, apart from an illustration at the beginning, the stories were just written tales rather than the picture strips they eventually became, thus allowing full rein of one’s imagination. The moral values and ethics outlined in stories such as “I Flew with Braddock”, “Alf Tupper, the Tough of the Track”, and “Bernard Briggs” certainly steered me onto the straight and narrow as well as giving me an interest in the English Language and the format of writing stories. I doubt that they would be as successful today as cynicism, political brainwashing or satire appears to rule.

  16. “Alf Tupper, the Tough of the Track”,

    He turned up in Victor Book for Boys. He used to compete at track events, turning up covered in grease from his day-job as a mechanic, and afterwards eat fish and chips! Awesome!

  17. I used to get those little Commando comics which I see (after doing a quick search) are still available. I’m guessing they don’t have titles like “Jap Killer” anymore. I actually suspect the themes have changed entirely.

  18. I’m not interested comics (though do watch the Marvel moives), and bingo these sort of events making to take photos of the cosplayers and look for anime/manga and merch.

    Have only ever seen 1 incident that involved a guy somewhere on the autistic spectrum. Given how many young males with poor social skills and girls in skimpy outfits there are these places I can see on reflection why they feel the need for a policy, though this one is way OTT.

    One final point, it is amusing how female superheroes are now seen as empowering and role models when traditionally their role was to wear skintight outfits and give horny teenagers something to w•nk over.

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