Jess Flips

The British police, in the course of acting as street muscle for their wet political masters, beclown themselves further:

Police are looking into remarks by UKIP candidate Carl Benjamin after Labour MP Jess Phillips accused him of malicious communications.

Mr Benjamin, who is standing in the European elections, tweeted that he “wouldn’t even rape” Ms Phillips.

He has refused to apologise for the remark made in 2016, arguing that “any subject can be the subject of a joke.”

I’m not going to defend the remark, but it is three years old. The reason Phillips is blubbering to the police now is because Benjamin is running for political office at the same time her own profile is increasing. Launching police investigations in order to sandbag anti-establishment political campaigns is nothing new, but they were previously confined to tinpot nations. Secondly, when is saying you wouldn’t commit a crime now a crime? Is it all in the context? Because when Count Dankula was found guilty, it was ruled that context doesn’t matter. Not for the first time are the British authorities demonstrating they’re happy to just make things up as they go in order to protect the ruling classes.

Ms Phillips told the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme she “cried in the street” after hearing a video by him.

She said that until then she “had been putting a brave face on it and pretending that it was all fine and that I could cope”.

So the remark wasn’t even made to her face. To think, there are credulous fools out there who think this thick, weak, vulgar harridan who conforms to all the stereotypes foreigners have about British women is future prime minister material.

The Birmingham MP has called for people who “promote rape and sexual violence” to have a lifetime ban from running for elected office.

Frankly, I’d rather have an established Ministry of Raping, Pillaging, and Looting* than see citizens banned from running for office because they use unapproved words. Benjamin’s remark was distasteful in the extreme, but what Phillips is proposing here is something straight out of the worst dictatorships.

The MP for Birmingham Yardley told Victoria Derbyshire she did not fear for her physical safety, but worried for her mental health after thousands of messages from Twitter users attacking her in the last year alone.

“Sometimes I would rather someone punch me in the face than the constant degradation you suffer as a woman in the public eye,” she said. “It is constant, it constantly belittles you, it makes you blame yourself.”

It’s not because you’re a woman, it’s because you’re a nasty piece of work.

On Mr Benjamin, she said she could not understand how a person who wrote the comments online was allowed to run to be an MEP.

This itself should disqualify her from public office. When people talk about the decay of political morality in Britain, Carl Benjamin is probably a symptom. Jess Phillips and her ilk are very much the cause.

* We could just rename HMRC, I suppose.

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36 thoughts on “Jess Flips

  1. Well, it’s not even her being a nasty piece of work, it’s her being a politician. If you are going to put yourself in the public eye, put yourself up as someone who knows what is best for you and wants to be bossing everyone else around, you can expect to be on the receiving end of rather more and rather nastier stick than the harridan on the Clapham omnibus. It goes with the territory, and politicians need to develop thicker than average skins or get the fuck out of the job, not go crying to teacher every time that nasty boy says something nasty in the playground.

    Unless, of course, they want to introduce a bunch of lese-majeste laws such that the plebs and politicians with unapproved views aren’t allowed to criticise our current ruling class.

  2. Spot on. I’d say Carl Benjamin has done us all a large favour, revealing an utter fascist.

    I also echo BiG’s words. What happens if we get into a really sticky situation and our MPs have to stand up for this country against real threats? Some dictator of a large power telling them to surrender, or he’ll send his troops in to rape them or their wives? I’d like to know that our MPs will put country first and take the appropriate action.

    Being an MP isn’t like being middle management in a local authority. It’s not a bureaucrat’s job, but I think most of them have forgotten this.

  3. And..

    The studies done re on-line abuse clearly show that women don’t get the worst of it.

    Men do.

    I think MPs (probably of all sexes now) need to be issued with boxes of tissues ready for offence-taking and tear-shedding.

    I also agree with the above two gentlemen.

  4. The MP for Birmingham Yardley […] worried for her mental health after thousands of messages from Twitter users attacking her in the last year alone.

    What others have said, of course, but what is the addictive, enchanting siren power of Twitter that she can’t do without it? And how delicately balanced is the mechanism of her mind that she might be tipped over the edge into insanity by some bloke pointing out that she is a big pudding?

  5. What others have said, of course, but what is the addictive, enchanting siren power of Twitter that she can’t do without it?

    As Roger Scruton recently said in a podcast with Toby Young, why are politicians on Twitter anyway? They should be involved in the serious business of running the country, not fannying about on social media. The immaturity is staggering.

  6. To be fair to Philips she did stand up for Luciana Berger, who was at the wrong end of some very nasty anti-semitic abuse while she was pregnant and probably not in a good place to tell her socialist attackers where to shove it.
    But that was current. Dredging a 3 year old tweet seems whiny attention seeking in comparison.

  7. Luciana Berger is part of the same problem. I don’t know exactly what those ‘anti-semitic’ comments directed at her were, but I do know that a lot of comments which are placed in that category are valid and very deserved criticisms.

  8. “Secondly, when is saying you wouldn’t commit a crime now a crime?”

    This is the real nugget of unalloyed joy which lifts this case above the usual Twitter-based offence-taking.

    “Tim, I have no intention of glassing you in a pub, or indeed of burgling your house. Far worse, I have no intention of upskirting you on any occasion…”

    Does the above now make me a criminal? If an academic writes something to the effect that s/he has no intention of defending the holocaust, does that make them guilty of a crime? If a criminal in jail tells the parole board that they have no intention of re-offending, should they automatically be refused parole?

    This is a special type of thought-crime. We have passed the stage where intending to rape is a crime, and we are now at the stage where merely thinking about the topic (without the necessary show of approved linguistic disavowal) is enough to get you into trouble.

  9. The UK is an actual police state, and has been for some time. A few weeks ago, British police arrested an elderly black minister for the crime of reading aloud the King James Bible (!!!) on a street corner.

    The rest of western and northern Europe is equally bad. Germany may have lost WW II, but the Nazis clearly won it.

    Russia is the closest think to an actual free country that Europe has.

  10. If she’s really worried about her mental health why open it up again? Anyone with half a brain who’s been on Twitter will know that they would be inviting a Twitter storm and more offensive tweets.

    Anyway, I’m sure I remember her bragging on Women with Balls how strong minded and tough she was and that she wouldn’t let people win.

    Its almost like she wanted the publicity.

  11. Benjamin’s remark was distasteful in the extreme

    Pace Tim’s Law* we should not denounce the remark in any way. In fact, we should wholeheartedly support not raping people.

    Sargon’s tweet was strategic trolling, not some off the cuff banter. Shitlords can and have disagreed on the effectiveness of this strategy but I think it’s ultimately served the intended purpose: highlighting that authoritarian tendency to call everything illegal harassment.

    *Something like “You’re not required to denounce political allies or defend political enemies…so don’t.”?

  12. Pace Tim’s Law* we should not denounce the remark in any way.

    Fair point, but I’m not sure calling something distasteful is much of a denunciation.

  13. bob sykes

    “Russia is the closest think to an actual free country that Europe has”

    No worry: Russia has the propensity to try and export its brand of freedom to those suffering from / enjoying such delusions. You might just get lucky enough. Or else, do it the Michael Calvey way.

  14. calling something distasteful is much of a denunciation

    Agreed, but I wanted to emphasize the purpose of the tweet: to create a hill for the enemy to die on. It’s a risky strategy that relies on allies to defend something edgy.

    Also wanted to get the whole Tim’s Law thing going. =)

  15. I can only echo the above.
    Anyone reduced to tears by Mr. Benjamin’s remarks should be in care, not in office.
    How can anyone incapable of dealing with “threats” at this level defend anyone from anything?
    Anyone claiming that when it’s not true should be in a less tender type of care.
    How can we trust someone who has publicly lied.
    And that would hold true if a serious threat of harm was made, rather than a sarcastic non threat.
    We can’t afford to promote people on the basis of sympathy!

  16. If she really thinks ”
    people who “promote rape and sexual violence” to have a lifetime ban from running for elected office”

    She would want Naz Shah banned for her tweets

  17. A woman who bursts out laughing at mention of male suicides has a curiously delicate sensibility when she wants…..

    Her callousness is repellent.

    I hope that dude gets elected just for the screeching.

  18. There was very recently a review/replay of TV coverage immediately after Thatcher’s 1979 election win (40th anniversary on 3rd May). This was on Freeview Channel 232 (BBC Parliament), and I came across it while channel-hopping between the Sky News and BBC News TV channels. I hung in there for a few minutes.

    What was particularly noticeable was that the various interviewed politicians (winner, losers, peripheral) were so courteous about each other. Jim Callaghan commended Margaret Thatcher on her extreme hard work and dedication. Sadness was expressed that Shirley Williams lost her seat – and hope that she would soon succeed in getting back into the Commons in a bye-election. Variously, the importance of the election of the first ever UK female prime minister was recognised. Norman St John-Stevas said some nice things about the Labour Party campaign.

    How strange to have recognised, the ability and sincerity of opponents. How strange to emphasise policy differences rather than seeking to run down one’s opponents on the minor irrelevancies of their private lives or public slip-ups – and, if difficult, searching back years for a single misdemeanour. Clearly it was another world then.

    Best regards

  19. Pace Tim’s Law* we should not denounce the remark in any way.

    Tim’s a good guy, but despite everything he’s seen he still retains an entirely unwarranted sense of chivalry. If Jess Philips were a man and Benjamin had said something like “I wouldn’t even sodomize you” he wouldn’t be reacting in this way. He hasn’t yet accepted deep down that some women absolutely can be the enemy rather than damsels in distress in need of rescuing.

  20. “…happy to just make things up as they go in order to protect the ruling classes.”

    Can she really be regarded as such? A third-rate politician?

  21. Jess Phillips is a self-promoting feminazi and political lightweight. Before she entered Parliament she had just one job: business development manager with the charity Women’s Aid in the West Midlands, focussing on women from ethnic minorities. What can someone with her non-job-in-a-fake-charity background contribute to national governance?

  22. Nigel,

    They were the last of the war generation. Despite their political differences most had fought alongside each other for a common cause and understood sincerity. More importantly, they all acted in good faith and accepted that their political opponents also acted in good faith.

    The rot set in when the student politicians of the ’60s started to move in to real politics but never grew up. As someone said, bad faith changes everything.

  23. Phillips dismissed the 2015 New Year rapes /assault in Germany with open contempt for their victims.

    Hypocrite hardly covers it.

  24. “Launching police investigations in order to sandbag anti-establishment political campaigns is nothing new, but they were previously confined to tinpot nations.”

    I guess the U.S. is one of those tin-pot nations.

  25. Also wanted to get the whole Tim’s Law thing going. =)

    A fine goal, sir!

  26. “Benjamin’s remark was distasteful in the extreme”

    Nope, it was a clever use of words to troll her and cajole her into revealing her censorious agenda.

    “when is saying you wouldn’t commit a crime now a crime?”

    Exactly.

    Carl Benjamin Interview On Gibraltar’s National TV

    Jess Phillips: another fat, drinker & smoker MP who tells us we must not be fat, drink or smoke or else…

    “cried in the street”? Bullocks.

    Beaten by @Itellyounothing on May 8, 2019 at 5:53 pm said:

    “A woman who bursts out laughing at mention of male suicides has a curiously delicate sensibility when she wants…..

    Her callousness is repellent.”

  27. One from the archives:
    Jeremy Corbyn wants to give some minority of adult women more chance to share premises and to work in safety.
    Jess Phillips response:
    https://twitter.com/jessphillips/status/705746860301033472
    A terrifying woman who wants to diminish the range of freedoms of consenting adults and make life more dangerous for those who don’t have other opportunities.

  28. This was said three years ago. A commenter elsewhere has coined the rather nice phrase “offense archaeology”.

  29. I see it more as a shift towards politicians being elevated to god like status (as in France) where absolutely NO criticism, word of disapproval or negative comment can be made about them at any time, past present or future.

    It is about control and placing themselves above the common herd. You will NOT disagree or criticise your overlords, OR ELSE!

    The “If you can’t stand the heat, get out of the kitchen” rule applies. If you are going into politics, then you must expect the rough and tumble that goes with it and not plead special case.

  30. …the constant degradation you suffer as a woman in the public eye…

    I’ll bet she cheers each time Tommy Robinson gets milkshaked. But if anyone did it to her, that would be “encouraging violence against women”, earning a lifetime ban.

    This ban idea, coupled with #believeallwomen, would mean the end of men in politics, unless the #trans ideology comes to the rescue. The British goverment will then consist entirely of men sitting around in silly wigs…. which perhaps is not so different from what we have now.

  31. The British goverment will then consist entirely of men sitting around in silly wigs…. which perhaps is not so different from what we have now.

    Heh.

  32. If Jess Philips were a man and Benjamin had said something like “I wouldn’t even sodomize you” he wouldn’t be reacting in this way. He hasn’t yet accepted deep down that some women absolutely can be the enemy rather than damsels in distress in need of rescuing.

    Not really: it’s hard for me to hold Jess Phillips in any greater contempt than I do, and I have no sympathy for her over the remarks whatsoever.

    My comment was more a reflection of the fact I’m not a fan of using rape as a rhetorical device (or a plot device), any more than I am of the term “feminism is cancer”. I find it bad taste, but that doesn’t mean 1) it wasn’t effective, 2) I don’t think he should have done it, or 3) I have any sympathy for Phillips. If he’d said something else in equally bad taste but without the (rather lazy) use of rape, I’d have probably found it funny.

  33. “Why are politicians on Twitter anyway?”

    Doesn’t seem to have done Donald Trump any harm. It’s allowed him to bypass “The Establishment”. However I’m astonished that his account hasn’t been shut down by now. No doubt Twatter would dearly love to do so, but realise the fallout would be too great…

  34. Doesn’t seem to have done Donald Trump any harm. It’s allowed him to bypass “The Establishment”.

    Exactly, he’s a rank outsider whereas most politicians – especially Jess Phillips – has the entire establishment media in the tank for them. So why the hell are they on Twitter, acting like children?

  35. So why the hell are they on Twitter, acting like children?

    Something I, as an avowed abstainer, ask myself fairly often about the entire population of that ridiculous website.

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