Paddy Feelz

I found this article illuminating:

The stampede for Irish passports since the UK voted to leave the EU has been widely interpreted as an effort by Britons to avoid hassle at airports. Produce proof of an Irish granny and voilà, no matter what happens with Brexit, you have a burgundy passport and can travel freely throughout the EU.

Applications for Irish passports have risen to record levels, with almost 250,000 requests since January, a 30% increase from the same period last year, according to the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade. Of the 860,000 Irish passports issued last year, about 200,000 applications came from the UK.

The vast majority of those 200,000 British people applying for Irish passports haven’t the slightest interest in Ireland; they simply want the convenience of an EU passport. There was a time when citizenship actually meant something, and if you speak to Irish nationalists they insist it still does – although only in the very narrow sense of not being British. But now Irish citizenship is becoming something akin to a flag of convenience in the shipping world whereby the holder knows nothing about the country and cares even less. But whereas flags of convenience were sold as revenue-raisers by tax havens or failed states, Ireland seems almost proud to be handing out passports to those fleeing the horrors of non-Brexit Britain.

I supposed we shouldn’t be too surprised. Ireland sold its culture to corporations decades ago, proliferating around the world one fake pub with tin-whistle band at a time. I wrote about this here:

It’s interesting to note how St. Patrick’s day has become a meaningless excuse to get hammered while displaying just about every ignorant stereotype about Irish people you can imagine.

From what I can see, Ireland is fast becoming a meaningless blob of woke multiculturalism and supplicant internationalism with a fake green tinge. Their economy is based on giant foreign corporations paying little tax, and their prime minister is a gay man of Indian extraction. Their most important political decision in a generation, the lifting of the ban on abortions, had them throwing street parties. Not that there’s anything wrong with those per se –  it’s up to the Irish how they run their affairs – but it does indicate they’ve abandoned conservatism and gone full-on liberal in the American sense. I’m not convinced this is a path to success, longevity, and happiness for any society.

What’s ironic is the Irish hate the English, particularly the London-based elites who look down their noses at everyone else. They complain the media reports clumsily on Ireland, except for the BBC who still think it’s part of Britain. Most of all, they detest the arrogant political classes who ride roughshod over ordinary people and are never held accountable for their actions. Which is fine, but they’ve now added Brexit to their list of gripes, as if it were the Westminster ruling classes who voted Leave and the ex-miners in the provinces who voted Remain. It’s an odd thing to hate the English elites for Brexit when it is they who’ve done all they can to scupper it. Indeed, the way things are going Theresa May might well turn out to be the most pro-Irish British prime minister in history.

This contradiction is illustrated further in the examples The Guardian uses of Brits who are looking to flee non-Brexit and settle in Ireland:

“I’m building up to be an Irish citizen, that’s the long-term goal,” said Keith Donaldson, 37, an office manager from Jarrow in north-east England who moved to Dublin last year.

He has no Irish lineage but can apply for naturalisation after five years’ residency. “Some things you can’t do unless you’re a citizen,” Donaldson said. “I’ve started getting involved in various political groups. It’s about contributing, being a member of Irish society. I identify myself as being a Brexit refugee.”

Remarkably, the Irish seem happy to welcome Englishmen whose views are indistinguishable from those of the Westminster elites to come and meddle in their politics before he’s even got citizenship. This is quite some shift in attitudes.

“Moving here gave me the possibility to be here long enough and apply for citizenship. I have to be here for five out of nine years,” said Alexandre de Menezes, 39, a dual British-Brazilian national who teaches soil microbiology at National University of Ireland Galway. “Being half British was always important to my identity, but Brexit took some of the shine away.”

So he was already in Ireland.

Kate Ryan, 40, a food writer from Bristol, married an Irish man and lived in Clonakilty, County Cork, for more than a decade without thinking much about nationality. Then came the referendum.

“It was always in the back of my mind that I would go for citizenship, but Brexit has forced my hand,” she said. This week, Ryan lodged an application for naturalisation. In the absence of Irish lineage, it entailed reams of paperwork and will cost about €1,500 (£1,285). “I decided to crack on and get this thing done.”

This is a paperwork exercise which she probably should have done anyway.

Ryan is proud of her British heritage and regularly visits her parents – who voted for Brexit – in Wales. But she feels European. Becoming Irish would underline that identity: “I see it as an opportunity to redefine who I am and my place in the world.”

So she wants to become an Irish citizen in order that she identifies with something else, and her place in the world is defined by the paperwork she holds. Being a member of a modern, western society seems to have a lot to do with worshiping political institutions and little to do with shared history and culture.

Mike Clarke, who recently left Brighton to take up a post as director of campus infrastructure at Trinity College Dublin, envisages putting down roots. “I plan to stay in Ireland as long as I can. UK plc will take an awful long time to heal,” he said.

Clarke, who grew up in Croydon, south London, has an Irish grandparent, so has a smooth path to citizenship. “I’m a very proud Englishman and British citizen. But I think of myself as European,” he said.

I’m a very proud Englishman and British citizen but I’ll become Irish via bureaucratic fiat because I think of myself as European. Personally I have no problem with Ireland inviting in people who want to dine at the smorgasbord of multicultural identity, I’m just not sure their society will be strengthened by their doing so.

Bill Foster, the managing director of the Irish division of the immigration consultancy Fragomen, said he probably would not stay long enough to obtain citizenship. But for now, he is glad to have swapped London for Dublin.

“There’s a feeling here that we want to move forward and not hanker back to the past. Living here has made me feel more European in many ways,” he said.

I find it hard to believe he found London a hotbed of English nationalist Brexiteers, so what I think what he’s saying is, having moved from London to Dublin, he’s noticed he’s now living among a lot more Europeans.

What’s obvious from all this is the Irish professional classes have a lot more in common with the English professional classes than they think, and the Irish ruling classes aren’t a whole lot different from those who are squatting in Westminster. It’s only the fault lines of history that are preventing them seeing where the real divides are.

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56 thoughts on “Paddy Feelz

  1. the 860,000 Irish passports issued last year

    That seems an awful lot of passports issued for a nation with a sub-5m population, even if the numbers have been swelled by Remoaning Brits.

    Still, not my problem. If they want to offer safe haven to readers of The European, good luck to ’em.

  2. Britain and Ireland have been a free travel area since the 1801 union. People have been moving between ever since, mostly Irish coming to England for work. Half of England can claim some Irish ancestry, and an awful lot of Irish have some English ancestry.
    Hence whatever the beginnings and however rocky the road you’d struggle to find a difference between the two cultures. Indeed reading the inscriptions on monuments raised in Eire at the time of independence they were struggling then.
    As far as I can see this is either people in Eire finally getting their paperwork in order- perhaps they fear that the Irish will have a crackdown once Britain is gone- or people virtue signalling because they believe the EU bullshit.

  3. Like many people from Liverpool I don’t have drop of English blood but we have been here from Ireland and wales for about 4 generations now for all that matters. I was born English and raised English and I’m hoping to die English as I owe so much to this country but then I’m pretty old with rather quaint ideas of patriotism etc.

  4. The remainiacs–scum tho’ they be–are far less of a problem than the million plus imports being lined up for Ireland. Vile tho’ the EU sucking traitor-trash are they aren’t running around terrorising Dublin with machetes–as are say Africans .

  5. Sailors who’ve anchored off nice islands around the globe will tell you that yachts with flags from small British dependency islands (eg British Virgin Islands) and other locations of convenience are nearly always owned by very dodgy folk with accents not normally associated with those locations.

    They’re also nearly always the first to drag anchor when a big blow comes. Read into that what you will.

  6. My wife’s parents are both Irish so both she and the kids could claim Irish citizenship (I’d need to live there for a year). That was actually a factor in my youngest’s decision to cast his first ever vote to vote leave – he figured if it all went pear shaped he had an out. 18 and already cynical – makes a man proud.

  7. “ I identify myself as being a Brexit refugee.”
    I identify you as a complete prick.
    Of all my friends who can apply for an Irish passport, many have said the have/might purely to for convenience travelling in Europe. A few cannot bring themselves to identify as Irish in any way and would put up with any inconvenience rather than get a ‘foreign’ passport.
    My wife and kids can apply but haven’t got around to it – I can’t so I’m leaving it up to them to do whatever they see fit.

    As for Leo, he’s playing a poor hand very well, the exact opposite of May who is (deliberately) playing a strong hand poorly. Concern for him must be in the case of a so called No Deal, Ireland would be the biggest loser. I bet his current European mates would leave him to dangle in the wind once he’s served his usefulness to them.

  8. The Irish inferiority complex makes them easy targets for globalist cant. The Irish are tripping over themselves to prove to the Manor House that they are not rednecks but “progressive” with the latest fashions. It’s all so obvious and tiresome. Ditto for the Spanish left.

  9. “Ryan is proud of her British heritage and regularly visits her parents – who voted for Brexit – in Wales. But she feels European.”

    How does anyone “feel European”? Denmark is like a different world to Spain. And I don’t just mean it’s colder and people have lighter skin, but everything: food, humour, priorities. Denmark is more like the USA than Spain.

    This is just a pose, isn’t it? “Look, I’m not a racist Little Englander”, yet ironically, they’re moving to somewhere with pastier skin.

  10. “As far as I can see this is either people in Eire finally getting their paperwork in order- perhaps they fear that the Irish will have a crackdown once Britain is gone- or people virtue signalling because they believe the EU bullshit.”

    Or (like me, though I haven’t done anything yet, like many others I would qualify for an Irish passport on the grounds of a grandparent born in Ireland) thinking that if Corbyn gets in a passport that can’t be rescinded by the UK State might not be a bad idea to have hidden in your drawer……

  11. Ireland is so wokely liberal that it’s harder to get Irish than German citizenship by descent. That’s why there are lots of Germans living in Namibia despite not having any direct connection to the country for four or more generations, and why the authorities here told me I might well already German, if only I can go find an improbable sequence of long-lost colonial-era documents in an impoverished banana republic to prove it. And, by the way, wouldn’t have to then give up the citizenship of that country which I didn’t know I had. I decided naturalization with renunciation of the least useful of three citizenships was the path of least resistance.

    Citizenship is a convenience. If it’s tied up intimately with identity for you, then, great, for you. To me it’s a convenience. I do, emotionally and legally, identify as both German and British. I guess the emotional identity gives me two teams to watch lose the world cup, two refuges should I become a (more of) scoundrel, and means I can passionately defend the virtues of black pudding as much as white asparagus (season’s on – come to Germany while you can), but it isn’t really important. The practicalities are important. Your mileage may vary.

  12. “From what I can see, Ireland is fast becoming a meaningless blob of woke multiculturalism and supplicant internationalism with a fake green tinge. Their economy is based on giant foreign corporations paying little tax, and their prime minister is a gay man of Indian extraction.”

    The funny thing is that Varadkar is strutting around like he’s joined the big league. Once the UK is sorted out, the EU is going to go after Corporation Tax and Ireland is going to get really stitched up.

  13. Once the UK is sorted out, the EU is going to go after Corporation Tax and Ireland is going to get really stitched up.

    Exactly. Leo thinks he’s earning brownie points in Brussels. It’s going to a rude awakening for him when his immediate usefulness is over.

  14. UK and Ireland are not part of the Schengen zone, so it is necessary for passport holders of both nationalities to show their passport on entering the zone from outside. Once inside, since there are no internal border controls showing a passport is not required, there being nobody to look at them.

    This being so, it makes no difference to travel to or within the EU Countries, whether you have a British, Irish, French or Canadian passport.

    UK being in or out of the EU makes no difference with respect to passport control therefore.

    And even if you are a citizen of a Schengen Country you still have to show some form of ID, if say you travel from the UK to France,

  15. Citizenship is a convenience. If it’s tied up intimately with identity for you, then, great, for you. To me it’s a convenience. I do, emotionally and legally, identify as both German and British.

    No, I think you’re misreading me. Identity is not based on citizenship, but IMO citizenship should be based on identifying in some way with that country. If citizenship is handed out to people who have little to no identity with a country in terms of its culture, values, history, language, etc. its value is diminished. It’s also in all likelihood very bad for the future of the country. This is how you end up with Somali congresswomen accusing Jewish American men of being white supremacists.

  16. This being so, it makes no difference to travel to or within the EU Countries, whether you have a British, Irish, French or Canadian passport.

    They claim it’s because it allows them to live and work in the EU. But going to Ireland – a place where Brits can live and work anyway – is an odd way to realise these freedoms.

  17. Pat – …you’d struggle to find a difference between the two cultures. Indeed reading the inscriptions on monuments raised in Eire at the time of independence they were struggling then.

    Ha! Too right.

    Those statues/plaques are hilarious. There’s a real sense of the Irish having gone through a “year zero” type of revolution: evidently the first governments of the Republic felt the need to remake the public square in the image of Irish republicanism, so just about every public monument dates from the same period, and honours the same people – but there simply weren’t enough heroes to go round, so they had to cast a wider net. “WHEN THE I.R.A. MET TO DISCUSS OUR FREEDOM, THIS BRAVE DAUGHTER OF EIRE WOULD MAKE THE TEA. VALE CIARA CONNOLLY.” “THIS WAS THE HOUSE OF FINTON O’CONLAN (1862-1927), WHO BRAVELY DEFENDED THIS NATION BY LENDING MICHAEL COLLINS A FIVER DURING THE WAR.”

  18. Exactly. Leo thinks he’s earning brownie points in Brussels. It’s going to a rude awakening for him when his immediate usefulness is over.

    Why, do you think the cushy job with the six-figure salary won’t materialise?

    It’s going to be a rude awakening for his constituency in Ireland, I think you meant.

  19. I believe having lax standards for qualifying for Irish citizenship was meant to entice the Irish diaspora back to the motherland. Emigration was quite a huge problem for Ireland for a long time. (Might still be – certainly a lot of ’em moved down here ten years ago.)

    I don’t know whether it ever did much to offset emigration, but it’s surely not helping anymore. Funny how things work out.

  20. It’s going to be a rude awakening for his constituency in Ireland, I think you meant.

    Yes

  21. I think the EU may well push for global taxation (as America does) in the future. It would be hilarious to see these people forced to write a large cheque to Europe every year in addition to the local taxes wherever they are. American expats in the Far East typically pay far more to the IRS than their local authority, even if they haven’t set foot in the country for decades.

  22. “It’s interesting to note how St. Patrick’s day has become a meaningless excuse to get hammered while displaying just about every ignorant stereotype about Irish people you can imagine.”
    Bit behind the times, aren’t you? It’s been St Patrick’s week for a while now. A whole 7 days to be jostled by drunken, sweaty, pseudo-Paddies & their dependant sluts. Slainte! (not)

  23. ” If citizenship is handed out to people who have little to no identity with a country in terms of its culture, values, history, language, etc. its value is diminished.”

    Ah, so you are against acquiring citizenship by descent but naturalization is fine.

    Seeing as citizens by descent have it by right and can despise the country’s values (Ms Begum), not speak its language (some proportion of the population of Bradford), and spurn its culture (idem), whereas naturalizing citizens generally have to go through various background checks, cultural and language tests, and swear oaths of allegiance.

    Sorry I read you the wrong way around and thought you were against acquired citizenship rather than having it by right of descent.

  24. “This being so, it makes no difference to travel to or within the EU Countries, whether you have a British, Irish, French or Canadian passport.”

    Sure, you can travel within Schengen countries freely irrespective of the colour of your passport. It’s different getting in though. EU citizens have an absolute right to enter and stay as long as they please, Canadians don’t. UK citizens will be (hopefully) in the same boat as Canadians once Brexit has occurred.

  25. Sorry I read you the wrong way around and thought you were against acquired citizenship rather than having it by right of descent.

    What I’m against is people being granted citizenship who have little to no identity with a country in terms of its culture, values, history, language, etc. It makes no difference to me if these people have a grandparent or parent from that country or not. I see no problem with people acquiring citizenship by descent nor through naturalisation: it’s not the route which bothers me, it’s the sort of people who are going through it.

  26. From what I’ve read, about 100,000 Britons (excluding NI residents) applied for Irish citizenship in 2018, but only 500-something of those were resident Brits without an Irish grandparent. Which means, unless I’m missing something, that the rest were at least 1/4 Irish. If that’s good enough for Israel, why shouldn’t it be good enough for Ireland? You only have to pick up the accent. (BTW, Italy would give you a passport if your father’s grandfather was born there.) At least Ireland is getting a high-quality crowd compared with its neighbors. Plus, there’s plenty of room on the island. It has about the same population density as Scotland.

  27. What I don’t understand is how the so-called citizen test and the ability to communicate in English for attaining British citizenship is criticized and somehow racist. Yet here in Netherlands it is a prerequisite for being granted a Dutch passport. don’t pass the language exam, you don’t get the passport.

  28. If that’s good enough for Israel, why shouldn’t it be good enough for Ireland?

    What on earth does Israel have to do with Ireland, other than starting with the same letter?

    At least Ireland is getting a high-quality crowd compared with its neighbors.

    I think this immigration is “as well as” not “instead of”.

    Plus, there’s plenty of room on the island. It has about the same population density as Scotland.

    I’m not sure the issue is physical space. But since you mentioned it, Australia has plenty of space but everyone seems to want to live on top of one another, including newcomers.

  29. Yet here in Netherlands it is a prerequisite for being granted a Dutch passport. don’t pass the language exam, you don’t get the passport.

    I remember Oliver Kamm retweeting a Frenchwoman living in Perth complaining about plans to introduce English language tests for immigrants to the UK. I asked the Frenchwoman is she objected to the current French law requiring naturalising citizens to pass a French test. She never responded.

  30. …there’s plenty of room on the island…

    Not exactly relevant – for most of them the point of having an Irish passport is that they can remain EU citizens with visa-free access to places they do want to go. I doubt most of the passports will ever be renewed.

  31. Their economy is based on giant foreign corporations paying little tax
    Erm no. The economists have been over this and lower tax rates don’t drive an economy forwards. It’s the liberalisation of planning and employment that goes with it. The Republic does well on pretty much all measures of prosperity now, economic freedom, happiness, health, road safety, consumption per capita, and it has a diverse economy. There’s some daft laws there, like not being permitted to pay for sex, which the public largely ignore, which is part of what Irish identity is about imv.
    So a bunch of people are getting Irish passports to make their lives more convenient – that’s an increase in perceived freedom. It might be an increase in actual freedom. If the Republic doesn’t like it some day in the future, they are the ones who can decide they don’t like it.
    This is rather different to Great Britain where the public decide they don’t want EU membership, they collectively want to be about half in and half out with several models for this available, and they end up remaining an EU member.

  32. from “If I should fall from grace with god” by the Pogues

    This land was always ours
    Was the proud land of our fathers
    It belongs to us and them
    Not to any of the others

  33. Carey–“This is rather different to Great Britain where the public decide they don’t want EU membership, they collectively want to be about half in and half out with several models for this available, and they end up remaining an EU member.”

    Remainiac BS. We want out–false MP remainiac scum decided they can’t decide which “model” as an excuse for remain. Piss on them.

  34. I got my Irish passport about 11 years ago, so nought to do with Brexit. It was through helping my Irish mother, who never had a passport, apply for one and I applied at the same time. Strangely one of my sisters, who is married to a German guy and lives in Germany, is applying for her Irish passport now. It’s a mixed up world we’re living in!

    As for people wanting to have an Irish passport because “they want to be European”, thick doesn’t cover the plain stupidity of their thinking, they not understanding the difference between a “European country” and an “EU country”.

  35. @KevinS on April 9, 2019 at 8:07 pm said:

    I got an Irish passport about 23 years ago, so nought to do with Brexit. It was through helping my NI mother, apply for one and I applied at the same time.

    She was holidaying in Israel, then later in year in Jordan and Egypt – two passports thus useful.

    I have two DLs two: a GB one and an NI one.

  36. If, in the near future, the nations of western Europe dissolve into conflict, then their standing armies – or newly-established Republican Guards – or ad-hoc citizen’s militias – are going to need to draft a lot of men in a hurry. At that point, citizenship will suddenly become a very serious matter. That second colored booklet will turn you into a potential recruit for some, or potential traitor for others.

  37. Director of Campus Infrastructure.?
    He’s the janitor.
    Or Jannie, as we used to call ours.

  38. I like this blog and I read it most days, but my God you all don’t know much about Ireland… (With a few exceptions, I’m glad to see).

    “they simply want the convenience of an EU passport”
    Maybe so, but since only a tiny fraction of the 6m entitled UK residents have applied, and if they are one-quarter Irish, I really don’t see this doing much harm.

    “only in the very narrow sense of not being British”
    Maybe that’s the impression from loudmouths on Twitter. The rest of us happily identify with our culture, history, music, language, our native land, yadda, yadda. We are delighted with our independence from a rather cruel overlord (the UK) and maybe we harp on about it (probably unfairly), but we are not defined by it.

    “Ireland sold its culture to corporations decades ago, proliferating around the world one fake pub with tin-whistle band at a time”
    OH NO! People like our culture and want to replicate a little slice of it. How EVER will we survive?!

    “St. Patrick’s day has become a meaningless excuse to get hammered”
    When was it not?! Judge if you like… but we’ll be busy getting hammered…

    “Ireland is fast becoming a meaningless blob of woke multiculturalism”
    Well, conservatism went very badly for us, and again, there doesn’t seem to be any harm in it. The political system leaves little space for the kind of extremes seen in the US and UK.

    “Their economy is based on giant foreign corporations paying little tax”
    Factually incorrect. You can look at Ireland’s Gross National Product per capita for confirmation.

    “their prime minister is a gay man of Indian extraction”
    Since he’s quite popular, I can only assume that you take issue with his sexual orientation or his Indian genes… except that I know you’re no biggot, so actually I can’t parse that at all…

    “lifting of the ban on abortions, had them throwing street parties”
    I’ll thank you not to judge an entire country based on the antics of some fringe lunatics on what should have been a necessary but somber occasion.

    “they’ve abandoned conservatism and gone full-on liberal in the American sense. I’m not convinced this is a path to success, longevity, and happiness for any society.”
    The economic figures indicate otherwise.

    “Irish hate the English, particularly the London-based elites who look down their noses at everyone else.”
    You should take the Irish seriously, but not literally… we don’t hate the English at all. I mean, if that’s your standard, then we must assume that the UK hates Germany, which on a person-to-person level isn’t true at all.

    “they’ve now added Brexit to their list of gripes, as if it were the Westminster ruling classes who voted Leave and the ex-miners in the provinces who voted Remain”
    Ireland gets a lot of the same media the UK does – there’s no reason to think that they don’t understand who voted for what and why (at least a basic understanding).

    “Remarkably, the Irish seem happy to welcome Englishmen whose views are indistinguishable from those of the Westminster elites to come and meddle in their politics before he’s even got citizenship”
    See? We don’t hate the British. If he’s entitled to be there and is engaging in legal activity, nobody minds. That’s what you’re missing from the outside: The Irish don’t look at migration as diminishing our socity (no more than we would consider that the Irish diminished the USA or Australia – quite the opposite).

    Final paragraph:
    Again, you are missing a huge part of the story: The Irish professional class is (proportinately) massive. The government is always centerist and chosen on merit (percieved or otherwise) not ideology. The economic and political fault lines that you think you see based on comparison to the UK, simply don’t exist because despite the similarities, there are some significant differences between the two socities.

    “The Irish are tripping over themselves to prove to the Manor House that they are not rednecks but “progressive” with the latest fashions. It’s all so obvious and tiresome”
    So you’re happy to write-off the feelings of millions of people as a fashion, as if you are the only truly thinking person and EVERYBODY else is wrong…

    “This is just a pose, isn’t it? “Look, I’m not a racist Little Englander”, yet ironically, they’re moving to somewhere with pastier skin.”
    Nonsense – there’s English all over Europe and I’m sure they feel great affinity for it.

    “Once the UK is sorted out, the EU is going to go after Corporation Tax and Ireland is going to get really stitched up.”
    If you really think that’s how the EU works, I’m not surprised you want to leave it so badly. Small problem though: it’s nonsense. Any attempt to do this (and they have tried…) would be vetoed by… drumroll please… Ireland. And probably others too, since most of Eastern Europe also operates on the basis of a low-tax, fiscally conservative highly capitalist state. Also, the traditional high-tax states (notably France and Germany) are looking to lower their tax burden and government spending.

    “but there simply weren’t enough heroes to go round”
    Yes, well, a certain government kept killing them before they got much done…

    “it’s not the route which bothers me, it’s the sort of people who are going through it”
    Fair enough, but while it’s UK residents who’ve gone to the trouble of jumping through the hoops, they’re probably alright…

  39. I’ve grandparents from all four home nations and shall be availing myself of an Irish one at some point, and a Scottish one should they go independent.

    Mercenary? Certainly.

  40. Virtue-signalling reasons aside, it’s an entirely rational course of action to take if one qualifies for a second citizenship and don’t have to revoke the original one.

    Imagine being an 18 year old working class American boy in 1969 when the Vietnam draft was underway. Would a second passport have been handy? Hell yeah.

    Ditto a white Zimbabwean during the worst of the Mugabe years, a European Jew in the 1930s, a non-fundamental Iranian in the final years of the Shah, etc.

    As Tim points out in the article’s examples, most of this is utter “despite Brexit” bullshit. If you can apply for a second passport from a safe country, you’d be a fool not to do so.

    We applied for dual passports for our kids the month they were born. Why? Because we could.

  41. Yes, well, a certain government kept killing them before they got much done…

    Yeah, that’s a solid rebuttal. Whoever heard of the Irish putting up memorials to people martyred by the English?

  42. HibernoFrog,

    It appears we agree on almost all my observations, where we differ is whether they are good or bad thing for Ireland. Like I said, it’s up to the Irish how they run their country; I just don’t think they’re heading in the right direction. Now I get you might think everything’s grand, but I also meet Canadians who think Justin Trudeau is a statesman and people who think New Zealand’s prime minister demonstrated phenomenal leadership recently. Each to their own: I just supply commentary.

  43. Virtue-signalling reasons aside, it’s an entirely rational course of action to take if one qualifies for a second citizenship and don’t have to revoke the original one.

    It’s perfectly rational for half the third world to show up in Europe and stay there, if that’s what’s on offer. I’m not criticizing people for responding to incentives, I’m criticizing the government policy of offering them.

  44. “It’s perfectly rational for half the third world to show up in Europe and stay there, if that’s what’s on offer. I’m not criticizing people for responding to incentives, I’m criticizing the government policy of offering them.”

    I know, and I agree. Over time, Ireland may well come to regret the supplanting of their population.

    Of course, the irony is completely lost that they spent hundreds of years fighting to shake of the colonial masters only to rush headlong into the arms of a different set. See also; Scottish Nationalists who want to leave the Union but be part of the EU.

    Their choices to make and enjoy or regret.

  45. “…Australia has plenty of space but everyone seems to want to live on top of one another, including newcomers.”

    The Australian government can’t even figure out how to reliably supply water to country bumpkins, let alone high-speed internet and pumpkin spice lattes. No wonder everybody’s moving to the city.

    Walter Egon – weren’t the Pogues English?

    Jonathan – excellent point

  46. Most Russians consider themselves Europeans too, maybe they should start getting Irish passports.

  47. When I was travelling alot for work I had two colleagues who had Irish passports -one from NI and one from England with Irish grandparents. Both claimed it made travelling to some countries much easier. IIRC Idia and Malaysia, and as someone else when travelling in the ME having a couple of passports is useful.

    Anyway, this from the Speccie seems to have gone under the radar:

    Seventy years ago this month, a prime minister led a divided nation towards the exit from what was then one of the world’s most important organisations. On that occasion, Ireland was the country wanting to leave and there was no backstop to hold things up. Despite the pleas of the other member states, the Irish walked out of the Commonwealth.

    I was reminded of that moment this week as the budding bromance between the Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and France’s President Emmanuel Macron unfolded. Relations have never been better, Mr Varadkar cooed to nods from M. Macron. As well he might. For Varadkar has just returned his nation to the Commonwealth fold — by signing up to the French Commonwealth.

    To the astonishment of diplomats all over the world, Ireland is now a proud junior member of the Organisation Internationale de la Francophonie, the Paris–based organisation for those bits of the world once ruled by the French. The official reason, according to Varadkar’s government, is that Ireland wants to increase its ‘global footprint’ and because Samuel Beckett wrote the odd play in French.

  48. Presumably the Jarra lad is completely unaware of how unstable the Irish economy is? Otherwise this “BREXIT refugee” would have sought sanctuary somewhere else. I predict it will not be too long before he does a Shamima and pleads to be let in again.

  49. About the robustness of the Irish economy :

    “US multinationals contribute significantly to Ireland’s economy, making up 14 of the top 20 Irish firms (by turnover), directly employing a quarter of the private sector labour-force, paying 80% of business taxes, and creating 57% of non-farm private sector OECD value-add. ”

    This is coming under threat from Trump’s tax reforms and also from the EU

    ” the EU’s impending 2018 Digital Sales Tax (and stated desire for a Common Consolidated Corporate Tax Base)), is also seen as an attempt to restrict the use of the Irish multinational tax schemes by US technology firms.”

    It seems that Tim is better informed than Hibernofrog. Clearly Germany and the EU have Ireland in their sites – the Eastern economies are not so reliant on dubious tax policies

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