Departments of Higher Religion

Via a Twitter correspondent, a piece by Toby Young in The Spectator on Accenture’s wokeness:

New employees at the British headquarters of Accenture, a global management consultancy, were slightly taken aback during a recent induction morning when the head of human resources encouraged them to wear rainbow-coloured lanyards declaring themselves ‘allies’ — not just at the meeting, but permanently. In addition, they were given the option of adding the word ‘ally’ in the same rainbow pattern to the footers of their company email addresses. Anyone confused by HR language — a reference to the second world war perhaps? — was referred to the company website, where the word ‘ally’ was helpfully defined: ‘An ally is someone who takes action to promote an inclusive and accepting culture regardless of their own identity and demonstrates commitment to an inclusive workplace. We currently have allies programmes for Mental Health, LGBT and People with Disabilities.’

It’s not just politics that’s becoming infantalised with cheap gimmickry, it’s everywhere. There is some good news, though:

This madness, which long ago infected university campuses, is now seeping into HR departments of large employers. The result is the rise of the woke corporation, and it might affect the way you work. Certainly, no one should assume that their own company, however sensible-seeming, is immune.

Crackpot ideas that used to be confined to neo-Marxist professors in grievance studies departments have been enthusiastically embraced by the giants of capitalism. Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Goldman Sachs, Coca-Cola are all on board and anyone who publicly challenges this new orthodoxy is not merely endangering their chances of promotion, but at risk of being fired.

And that is that companies which operate like this will not survive long once their legacy rents run out. As I’m fond of saying, it’s small and medium-sized companies which reject this garbage or turn it to their advantage which represent the future for bright, capable individuals.

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23 thoughts on “Departments of Higher Religion

  1. Unfortunately I think it will go this way. The process will accelerate as European white majorities start to become just another minority, albeit the largest one (for now).

    The US is not that far off. UK major cities are not that far off.

    I really hope it’s different now, but over the long sweep of history, heavily-mixed communities have a bad history of stability. Race isn’t the only factor, religion can be too; it’s more about tribalism in its wider sense. It can often work fine when times are good, people can rub along quite well. But when resources get tight, fault lines in societies get opened up.

    There’s a reason it’s called Balkanisation…

  2. To the official / HR mind, tolerance is indistinguishable from indifference. Indifference in this context would be quite adequate, but it’s not positive enough for the official / HR mind.

  3. We used to have tolerant intolerance. Now we have intolerant tolerance.

    The first just allowed everyone to muddle along. The second requires enforcement.

  4. “And that is that companies which operate like this will not survive long once their legacy rents run out.”

    Yup. The bureaucrats take over and the bureaucrats are conformists. And people of a conformist mind accept all sorts of things that are told to them.

    Look at Apple. How much real innovation has come out of Cupertino in 10 years? There’s Siri, but that was bought and they’ve barely improved it. They’ve made Macbook Pros with rubbish keyboards (Macs used to have the best keyboards). New shiny head office (Parkinson: “perfection of planned layout is only achieved by institutions on the point of collapse.”).

    I always feel safer in smaller, punky organisations. You often work harder and it’s often chaos, but I know that I’m staying strong. Bureaucratic places, you’re getting weaker working in them.

  5. Back in 2016, Hillary made a speech on one of her rallies which went like this:

    “Not everything is about an economic theory, right?” Clinton said, kicking off a long, interactive riff with the crowd at a union hall this afternoon.
    “If we broke up the big banks tomorrow—and I will if they deserve it, if they pose a systemic risk, I will—would that end racism?”
    “No!” the audience yelled back.
    Clinton continued to list scenarios, asking: “Would that end sexism? Would that end discrimination against the LGBT community? Would that make people feel more welcoming to immigrants overnight?”

    By bending over backwards to the gays, these companies are demonstrating to the world that they don’t need further regulation.

    It helps that gays make great employees: they don’t have kids and therefore are willing to put in longer hours, do more foreign travel, etc. Immigrants make great workers too (second generation immigrants not so much). No companies tout the value of motherhood or the elderly, despite maternity discrimination and age discrimination being very real things. Tech companies in particular are notorious for age discrimination.

  6. I’m not so sure, rainbow lanyards etc, etc, are common where I work, and there’s plenty of side waffle around the softer fringes of protected classes, identity politics and trendy social causes (mental health etc…). But it doesn’t really impact on day to day work, it’s mainly lives in the same social space as office sweepstakes, 5 a side football etc… You just need to be professional about it. And that is key, it’s only really an issue for the rabidly intolerant, or specifically the rabidly intolerant too stupid to keep it to themselves. You don’t have to like the people you work with, or even approve of their lifestyle or views, just be polite and professional and don’t go out of your way to wind people up, and if you’re too much of an obnoxious gobshite to manage that then it’s probably not a good idea for the organization to employ you in the first place. Same kind of thing goes for harassment; keep your hands to yourselves and don’t be a letch and you should go okay!

  7. But it doesn’t really impact on day to day work, it’s mainly lives in the same social space as office sweepstakes, 5 a side football etc… You just need to be professional about it.

    I suspect there’s a lot of truth to that, but I do wonder if indifference will soon be seen as intolerance (as another commenter recently said). Also, I’ve anecdotal experience that if the top management are concentrating on this sort of nonsense, something more fundamental is being overlooked. That was certainly the case in my last place of work: bulletins about International Women’s Day and LGBT awareness, meanwhile employees were leaping from windows to their deaths.

  8. Indifference has been seen as intolerance for quite some time now.

    Seinfeld is the best.

  9. Are you sure that last sentence wasn’t a case of cause and effect?

    It might be!

  10. “We currently have allies programmes for Mental Health, LGBT and People with Disabilities.”

    If we can get White Supremacism classified as a mental health issue or a disability, I think I can see a way forward here…

  11. When I worked for Accenture, HR was mostly focusing on hiring lots of graduates, ignoring recent grads moaning about being placed on rubbish projects, managing the bell curve performance management approach and firing rubbish people. Clearly too many people with not enough to do.

  12. The crucial thing here is that ordinary people are learning to keep very very quiet about what they really think. Being required to parrot something that you don’t really believe is not good for the soul and will create resentment over time.

    See your “pick a Colour” post below. These two things are related.

  13. just be polite and professional and don’t go out of your way to wind people up.

    How does this apply when corporate HR is telling all their Catholic and Evangelical employees to get on board with gay marriage?

    One can’t help but notice that this is a one-way street, and certain beliefs are tolerated much more enthusiastically than others.

  14. One can’t help but notice that this is a one-way street, and certain beliefs are tolerated much more enthusiastically than others.

    Yeah, thinking about adding Islam to my HR tick boxes in future along with the existing LBGT+ and Disabled ones. Nothing too harsh, maybe a bit of Sufism. That should be easy enough to fake. Maybe change my name to “Abu Manannán mac Lir”. Nice and ethnic. That should confuse most people which is always a good tactic.

    Anyone that fucks with me is going to struggle unless they’ve got actual HD video of me buggering the Bursar.

  15. @Tim

    “And that is that companies which operate like this will not survive long”

    Oh but they will. These companies are not in the business of producing anything, they are in the business of extracting rents through political favours. To buy those favours from the ruling political classes, they need wokeness as the preferred currency du jour. And the agile little guys who actually produce value are who those rents are ultimately extracted from. Nobility vs bourgoisie all over again. Unlikely to change without the guillotine.

  16. I have the deepest sympathy with you guys. I can’t imagine what it feels like working under these conditions. Must be like spending your days gardening in a minefield. Apart from the vociferous Irish republican who had to have the finer nuances of political discourse pointed out to him with a length of scaffold pole I can honestly say I can never remember anyone in a work environment, male or female, being disturbed by anything was said or done. And that’s a very broad range of said or done. They pissed you off you told them to fuck off. That was the end of it. But we were all grown ups.

  17. “How does this apply when corporate HR is telling all their Catholic and Evangelical employees to get on board with gay marriage? ”

    It’s non-issue unless it directly affects your job, and even then all you have to do is your professional duty. If the problem is that some people are really intolerant, they are the problem, not what they have an issue with. But it’s true I am indifferent to a lot of these things, because I don’t see them as intrinsically harmful.

    I’m not a fan of identity politics (it’s largely a scam), but when people say thing like ‘in the good old days we could all have a bit of harmless banter about the gays/ethnic minorities/disabled/women/other weaker group (select as appropriate) and nobody minded’ what they really mean is that they mostly weren’t on the receiving end of it, or at least not the most hurtful and unpleasant stuff, so it wasn’t so bad.

  18. “‘in the good old days we could all have a bit of harmless banter about the gays/ethnic minorities/disabled/women/other weaker group (select as appropriate) and nobody minded’ what they really mean is that they mostly weren’t on the receiving end of it, or at least not the most hurtful and unpleasant stuff, so it wasn’t so bad.”

    Except those of us went through the “good old days” struggle to remember any of the named groups going through anything. It’s not actually how people behaved. What do you think we were?

  19. “I’ve just flown in from California, where they’ve made homosexuality legal. I thought I’d get out before they make it compulsory.” Bob Hope

  20. So if I’m not an ally does that mean I’m with the Axis powers? (Well Hugo Boss always ensued the SS were well turned out and you can now but his stuff in House of Fraser).

  21. “Nobility vs bourgoisie all over again.”

    “Governments, if they endure, always tend increasingly toward aristocratic forms. No government in history has been known to evade this pattern. And as the aristocracy develops, government tends more and more to act exclusively in the interests of the ruling class – whether that class be hereditary royalty, oligarchs of financial empires, or entrenched bureaucracy.” – Frank Herbert

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