LGBT Intolerance

Yesterday, via a Twitter user, I stumbled across this tweet:

Seems sensible, doesn’t it? Only the first response disagreed with the sentiment and linked to this article:

I’m a gay scientist – a passionate chemist and a proud member of the LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, plus) community. In recent years, I have often spoken and written about the lives and experiences of LGBT+ scientists, including my own, but some of the responses still shock me:

You are mistaking us for people who give a sh*t – Your sexuality is NOT important vis-a-vis your job.

Imagine replacing the word ‘sexuality’ with ‘identity’ – how would that make you feel in your place of work?

There is no obligation whatsoever on the part of your colleagues to ascribe any importance to your “identity”. If their not doing so makes you feel bad, you’re seeking solutions to your problems in the wrong place. A workplace does not and should not double as a support group for people who need their “identity” validated. I’ve written recently about the importance of identity, but if you need to go around demanding everyone else validates it, I suspect it’s not one you’ve adopted naturally. Rather, it’s like complaining your parents don’t like clothes you’ve chosen to wear just because everyone else wears them.

The survey also made clear that people are more likely to ‘come out’ at work if they know their workplace is safe and welcoming, and less likely to come out if their workplace is unsafe or hostile.

Ah, but you’re not just demanding a safe and non-hostile workplace, are you? You want everyone to go a step further and appreciate – by force if necessary – the supposed importance of your sexual orientation.

This is a damning indictment of the workplace environments scientists are creating, and should make us think long and hard about how we can ensure that everybody feels included and supported.

Oh please. In Britain LGBT people are blessed to be around the most open, welcoming, and supportive people on the planet who for decades have happily accepted people who are different into their ranks provided they are well-behaved, respectful and don’t cause trouble. How long do you think ordinary people who have never shown any animosity towards LGBT people, and happily seen national legislation passed for their benefit, are going to tolerate authoritarian cretins like you demonising them as bigots at every opportunity? I’ve written about this before:

By moving away from the principle that consenting adults ought to do as they please towards one of forcing moral acceptance of their choices onto a reluctant public via the legal system, the gays have lost a lot of natural allies in the process, those people who may or may not have approved of what they do but on the principles of freedom and liberty believed they should have been allowed to get on with it. The question they ought to now be asking is who will they turn to when they are stripped of their victim status and chucked under the bus. They’re not going to find a lot of sympathy among those who didn’t care who shagged who but cared very much that the proprietors of pizza restaurants in Indiana were being crucified by the media, politicians, and gay lobby after being goaded into uttering the wrong opinions. The mainstream, in other words.

Back to the article:

In spite of my optimism about the new wave of LGBT+ scientists taking ownership of their identities, we must also remember that beyond our own privileged positions, such as in the UK, many scientists work in far less supportive environments. This includes countries where LGBT+ people have no rights, where it is illegal to speak about being gay, or where the act of homosexuality can even carry a death sentence.

And idiotic campaigns like yours are only going to make things worse. As I also said before:

One of the most effective arguments authoritarian government use to repress gays is one which suggests that turning a blind eye to gays results in a slippery slope of degeneracy which can lead to outcomes nobody wants or expected. Unfortunately, these arguments can be amply supported by pointing to intolerant, ridiculous cases in the west, such as the man who recently got arrested for heckling Caitlyn Jenner or the Christian bakers.

Demanding everyone attaches “importance” to co-workers’ sexual orientation is simply going to convince conservative rulers abroad that they shouldn’t give an inch to gay rights lobbyists. The people who will suffer most will be gays in those countries who just want to be left alone.

So how did the tweet thread end?

Now there’s a surprise, eh?  And to think, these people have the audacity to call everyone else intolerant.

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11 thoughts on “LGBT Intolerance

  1. Excellent article. This bit is interesting:

    “A workplace does not and should not double as a support group for people who need their “identity” validated.”

    100% correct in the vast majority of cases, but the difficulty here is that there is a small group of people who will demand your validation and approval, and if you don’t give it, they will use gossip, the HR Department, and the law to make damn sure that your life takes a sharp turn for the worse.

    I think a lot of the blame lies with the mainstream media. They can’t portray a “minority” without some level of “celebration”. The same type of people who would not dream of referring to a straight couple’s sexual habits like to subtly imply that gay sex is somehow good; people who would not think twice about varieties of indigenous culture will jump up and down to show how brilliant brown people’s lives are. The BBC and the Guardian are obviously the best at this.

    I don’t have a problem with this. Middle class people can dress up as knights and do jousting at weekends, or they can act as if (say) Caribbean culture is somehow better or think long and hard about gay sex. I don’t care. The difficulty is, though, that it encourages all the inadequates to keep demanding my attention. Repression is actually good for inadequates.

  2. Daimler advertised and encouraged employees to attend the Gay Pride parade in Portland. I have no clue why this is necessary. If gays are facing harsh treatment at work, which I doubt, then say that instead. Explain what the issues are and resolve them. That would actually be useful. But instead, they have to hide behind this cloak of social justice garbage that solves nothing.

  3. I find it curious that they identify only by their sexuality as if that is the only thing about them that defines them as a person.

    In that vein, I’m a leg and backside man so all you breast aficionados are repressing me! Makes sense? No? Then why does a homosexual (nowadays the term “gay” has morphed into meaning pathetic or inadequate – “That’s so gay!”. It’s hard to keep up) insist that theirs is the only valid “experience” allowed.

  4. These identity validating campaigns should be seen for what they are, the wielding of power by narcissists and bullies.

  5. 100% correct in the vast majority of cases, but the difficulty here is that there is a small group of people who will demand your validation and approval, and if you don’t give it, they will use gossip, the HR Department, and the law to make damn sure that your life takes a sharp turn for the worse.

    This is why companies need strong management and a proper HR person. Ahem.

  6. Daimler advertised and encouraged employees to attend the Gay Pride parade in Portland.

    I’ve seen a lot of criticism on Twitter this past week of the degree to which giant corporations have leapt on the Pride bandwagon.

  7. I try very very hard to believe that every single one of my colleagues blinks out of existence the moment they leave the office, and I hope they think the same of me. I have no interest in even innocuous aspects of their identity, what sports they play, what television they watch, whether they do amateur dramatics; the idea of find out out their sexual preferences fills me with horror, as I hope that finding out mine would horrify them.

    We have to interact for forty hours a week in order to collaborate on tasks for which we are monetarily compensated; we are not friends. We are strangers who happen to spend a lot of time in each other’s company, and the more we can ignore each others’ ‘identities’ and simply treat each other as interchangeable work-units distinguishable only by our particular skills and areas of knowledge, the more bearable that is.

    In short: please keep identity out of the workplace! It doesn’t belong there!

  8. I’d be very suspicious of any scientist or engineer who didn’t identify first and foremost as a scientist or engineer. Anyone who has enough time and energy to devote to measuring how many square millimeters of office space are given over to rainbow flags is obviously not spending anywhere near enough time solving equations and sorting out workable design compromises.

    Of course, such people can never be sacked, because they’ll bring the wrath of the LGBLTOMGWTFBBQ+/- brigade down on the heads of their former employers. So we’ll just let the cancer grow, because chemo would be too unpleasant…

  9. I’ve seen a lot of criticism on Twitter this past week of the degree to which giant corporations have leapt on the Pride bandwagon.

    Oh, definitely. I cannot think of any other group that has so much effort and money spent celebrating its existence.

    Imagine replacing the word ‘sexuality’ with ‘identity’ – how would that make you feel in your place of work?

    The whole point of science is that it’s supposed to be objective. A properly-conducted experiment should get the same results regardless of whether the person conducting it is a queer Latina bisexual of colour or a straight white English man. If it doesn’t, something’s probably gone wrong somewhere along the line.

    The survey also made clear that people are more likely to ‘come out’ at work if they know their workplace is safe and welcoming, and less likely to come out if their workplace is unsafe or hostile.

    Well, I not only don’t care about my co-workers’ sexual habits, I actively don’t want to know about them. So I guess I should do all I can to create an “unsafe”, “hostile” work environment, to minimise the chances that I’ll be forced to find out.

  10. I used to not care about gays. Now I’d oppose anything they support. Allowing this degeneracy to move from tolerated but hidden to openly flaunted really was the beginning of a slippery slope.

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