Brexit or the Good Friday Agreement?

Alas we never hanged Tony Blair, so he is free to come out with rubbish like this:

What I find sickening is that the Good Friday Agreement apparently locks us into the EU in perpetuity, and this detail was kept from the British public by the treacherous Prime Minister who signed it.

I’m not so sure the British people are as wedded to the Good Friday Agreement as the establishment types think: firstly, many people don’t think those amnesties should have been granted in the first place, and secondly terrorism – or rather, the methods of dealing with it – have changed considerably since the days of the Troubles. Anyone suspected of terrorism could find himself on an MI5 watch list which is shared with the FBI, making life rather difficult for them indeed.

If, as the likes of Blair and the EU mandarins are saying, the choice comes down to enacting Brexit or keeping the Good Friday Agreement, I say we put the latter through the shredder. We’ll deal with the consequences if and when they arise.

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20 thoughts on “Brexit or the Good Friday Agreement?

  1. Here here. I’d gladly give the finger to Ireland (north or south) if that’s what it takes to preserve a proper Brexit.

  2. I’d gladly give the finger to Ireland (north or south) if that’s what it takes to preserve a proper Brexit.

    Um. It’s not a ‘proper Bexit’ if you leave Northern Ireland behind. Or would you count an escape where you have to cut your hand off to get away a ‘proper escape’?

    Northern Ireland is part of the UK. Bexit was a vote for the whole of the UK. You can’t just slough off a million loyal citizens if they become a bit inconvenient.

    But as for the main thrust of the article, absolutely right. Note that the Agreement was only sold due to bare-faced lies on the part of Tony Blair: everybody goes on about Clegg and co lying by signing pledges not to increase tuition fees, but they at least intended to keep those if they were in opposition. Blair stood in front of a billboard with a signed promise that there would be no terrorists released without disarmament, and knew he was going to go back on it within a year.

    The whole thing was a shameful incident of a PM selling his own citizens down the river simply because he wanted a legacy (at that point, before Iraq was even imaginable, he thought he was going to go down in history as the PM who solved the Irish question, and he was prepared to commit any treason to do so — well, things change, mister.)

    But. Just remember to point out any time people say that Bexit jeopardises peace in Northern Ireland that the only people, the only people who can break the peace in Northern Ireland, are the terrorists.

  3. Yes

    If the EU want a border between NI & I they can put it up themselves.

    If Ireland doesn’t want it, Irexit and that is that!

  4. I do think dealing with the consequences would be less easy than you do but given the worlds attitude to terrorism now and Trump I imagine with some real effort we could crush any nascent IRA threat…..need somebody with more guts than May though.

  5. I do think dealing with the consequences would be less easy than you do but given the worlds attitude to terrorism now and Trump I imagine with some real effort we could crush any nascent IRA threat

    I think the main difference, aside from terrorists no longer enjoying the support of Americans, is how much of daily life has gone electronic and how much power the state has to dick with parts of that. These days your name can be added to a terrorist watch list on a whim, and you’ll know nothing about it until you find you can’t fly anywhere, or your bank account has been frozen. And this is for people who just visit the IRA web forums and express sympathy, the actual terrorists will do well not to end up in an orange jump-suit somewhere remote and unmarked on maps.

  6. S I’m with you. NI is part of the UK and can have no divergence. If that means a ‘hard border’ with Eire then so be it. What most commentators singularly fail to observe is what ‘hard’ means – the legea or the actual, practical reality. The UK could be outside a CU with the EU and thus have a legally ‘hard’ border – but the reality at the border is little to no enforcement. How ‘hard’ is a border that for all intents and purposes barely exists but which is where legally the EU CU abutts the UK which is outside it?

  7. “…Alas we never hanged Tony Blair…”

    I’m very the majority of the British people are very wedded to that sentiment.

  8. Henry, can you check your spam box? I’ve sent you two emails recently, didn’t get a reply to either. :-/

  9. Señor Bilbao: Agree. I would be surprised if the Republicans in the North would really go back to full-on terrorism if the EU insists on a hard border with the North. We should have no controls on our side but I wonder if the current UK government have the stones to insist on that. Perhaps the DUP can provide a bit of spine-stiffening there.

  10. I’m with Tim, the nature of terrorism and more importantly the US’s attitude towards it has changed.

    I was in the air on a flight to Malta when 9/11 happened. We didn’t even hear about until we got to the hotel and the concierge mentioned it as we got in to the lift. My colleague and I stared at each other in disbelief because the concierge had been cracking jokes with us as we checked in.

    That evening over dinner, having spent most of the afternoon glued to the news channels like everyone else, I mentioned to my colleague that this would be the end for the IRA’s fund raising and tacit support from from politicians in the USA, even the Kennedy’s would find it hard to continue their support, and they would be driven to the negotiating table. We certainly wouldn’t be seeing the likes of Adams given VIP treatment at St Patrick’s Day parades.

    Even if Brexit leads to some sort of split the IRA will find it very hard to start their murder and bombing campaigns with support from the international community, not least because most of the injustices, and they were real, that led to the troubles kicking off in the late ’60s have been fixed and they have a lot of political influence.

  11. And this is for people who just visit the IRA web forums and express sympathy, the actual terrorists will do well not to end up in an orange jump-suit somewhere remote and unmarked on maps.

    The IRA doesn’t really do ‘web forums’. Unlike al-Queda / ISIS, they were a heavily hierarchical organisation with a strict command structure, so they didn’t need to do the sort of ‘broadcast’ operation that Islamist terrorists do, where they spew their propaganda out over a wide area in the hopes that a few scumbags will take up their cause and make their own bombs. Sort of the clickbait approach to terrorism.

    The IRA, on the other hand, were they to start up again, would keep their activity off the inter-net; messages would be passed between cells in person by trusted couriers (operating in a small geographical area helps here).

    So that makes them harder to track in one way. On the other hand, not being fired with religious fervour, they were easier to turn into intelligence assets (one sometimes gets the impression that about 50% of the Army council were British agents by the end) so that made it easier in another way.

    But, the IRA was almost defeated once before, and if they start killing people in any serious way (because, of course, they haven’t really stopped, and have for the last couple of decades kept taking pot-shots at army barracks, just to keep their hand in) they will find it quite difficult to get back to even where they were before, I think.

  12. Oh dear, the Irish Question just will not go away, will it?

    However I could argue a proper border would, providing it is not subject to ‘cuts’ and ‘budget considerations’ provide employment for a lot of people (even if on balance I wouldn’t trust most of them, but then I have no intention of going through that border.)

    Maybe Norn Iron should be independent; after all it is Great Britain and Northern Ireland, so then it is up them to do what they like. Their circus, their monkeys.

  13. Some good points here. It is very much worth restating as S does, that if the IRA start murdering people again, it is their fault and responsibility and no-one else’s.

    I also second JuliaM; let’s deal with terrorists by shooting them. This works for Islamists as well as provos.

  14. Re Blair: it’s never too late.

    He’ll be around for a while, but not forever and neither will I.

    Prefer to see the heinous little traitor swinging over the entrance to Parliament as a reminder that the punishment for treason is death. Ideally, before I walk the shadow road to Tír na nÓg.

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