Court and Rolled

I’ve often written about the parallels between Brexit and Trump’s election, and another has revealed itself over the past few days.

I haven’t followed the story too closely, but it appears the American Establishment is going into meltdown over a phone call Trump made to the Ukrainian president. Their Russian collusion narrative having failed, they’ve effortlessly switched to trying to impeach Trump over this phone call to Ukraine. In many respects, this is hardly news: the insane wing of the Democrats – which is most of them – have been banging on about impeaching Trump for months. They have no idea what for, and nor do they care; they just want to force him from office. The only newsworthy bit about this story is that Nancy Pelosi has finally been browbeaten into getting on board with it.

When it comes to Trump, the American ruling classes threw out the rule book a long time ago. The joint intelligence community and Democrat attempt to prevent him being elected and then unseat him after the event would have resulted in lengthy prison sentences or executions in pretty much every other country at any point in their history. They lied through their teeth about the Russia collusion and activist judges are ensuring every move he makes gets blocked. They don’t care about the law, nor who sees it. All they care about is removing Trump from office and they’re prepared to bring the whole house down on themselves to do it. In many respects, the rule of law no longer applies in Russia.

On our side of the Atlantic, our political classes are doing much the same thing. The other night the supreme court judges upended the British constitution to declare Boris Johnson’s proroguing parliament was illegal because they couldn’t think of a reason why he did it. If we cut through all the bullshit, a handful of judges – who are very much members of the ruling classes and share their interests – decided to kill off another attempt to deliver the Brexit which was decided via referendum in June 2016. So Britain now has a politicised supreme court like in the US, one which considers itself above the monarch. The ruling classes aren’t even pretending any more. They might as well come out and say Brexit isn’t happening because they don’t want it to. It would at least be more honest, and they might avoid adding a string of appalling precedents to the one they’ve already set by refusing to enact the result of a free vote. As with the US, Britain is no longer a country of laws. It is ruling class free-for-all.

With each passing month, the barriers between peace and violence get torn down one by one. There is only one place at the end of this road, and that is the sort of political violence you see in failed states with politicians, judges, policemen, and journalists all fair game. I don’t think it will happen soon, though. Instead, we’ll enter into decades of being ordered around at the whim of the ruling classes, who take ever more brazen liberties while tightening the noose around our own. And then a generation will arrive who won’t stand for it, and the blood will start flowing.

It won’t be Nancy Pelosi or Brenda Hale who pay the price of their contempt for the people and the law, nor even AOC or Gina Miller. It’ll be their grandchildren, assuming they have any, who will inherit their privileges but not their protections. Those clowns hanging onto the words of Greta Thunberg are right to be worried about their children’s futures, but not for the reasons they think.

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109 thoughts on “Court and Rolled

  1. “think this is one of the places where first-past-the-post has served Britain quite poorly as an electoral system.”

    I disagree. Nearly 600 of the MPs comprising the current Parliament were elected on manifestos only 2 years ago that stated they would get Brexit done. People voted on things other than Brexit, because everyone said they would honour the referendum result. And then they’re done the exact opposite.

    Its not FPTP that’s at fault for the current situation, its politicians being lying c**ts.

  2. @Jim

    Here’s the counter argument.

    FPTP gives Labour that capacity to backslide on Brexit though. They were elected promising to do it but now many Lab MPs call themselves a “remain party”… This is possible since there’s essentially only one socialist / social democrat party and its position on Brexit is up for internal dispute, subject to any electoral constraints a possible policy imposes. There are costs to departing from the manifesto but also potential rewards. In a more proportional system, where there were both Brexit-supporting and remain-supporting left-wing parties, they’d be more likely to stick to their inherent positions, which would be more deeply ingrained than disposable manifesto commitments.

  3. Re: Corbyn and Labour’s current position, it just seems to me he has made the calculation that any election at this point would result in a Labour loss. Similarly, opposing a hard Brexit looks better to his party supporters. So, in spite of the fact that both would strengthen Britain’s negotiating powers many times, he must perforce oppose them.

  4. MBE,

    I was a big supporter of AV reform for this reason. You get more competition.

    I’ve come to the conclusion that while wonkish types like us see the problem, much of the public don’t. It will take an election full of vote splitting, with say, Conservatives winning a massive number of seats with tiny majorities, for people to wake up.

    In the meantime, exploit the weakness of the system and threaten to split votes. The reason we got New Labour is that the LDs kept splitting the vote until Labour had no choice but to be a lot like the LDs. UKIP got a referendum by splitting so many seats in 2010 that the Conservatives got very nervous.

  5. It will take an election full of vote splitting, with say, Conservatives winning a massive number of seats with tiny majorities, for people to wake up.

    There’s a lot in that. Blair ’05 (35% of votes, 55% of seats) was one of the more disproportionate examples of recent times. but in a sense that was a “fairer” result than the percentages suggest – it was the Lib Dems who had eaten into the Labour vote-share, so the centre-left won the election despite being split. Just that the spoils were apportioned unfairly between the two parties…

    I think the Tories were so anti-AV less out of love of traditional voting methods but mostly because they aren’t used to being squeezed so didn’t want to give up a traditional advantage. There’s an interesting piece here by Professor Matthew Goodwin about Johnson’s strategy of wooing back TBP voters and how likely it is to succeed:

    https://unherd.com/2019/09/can-boris-win-back-brexit-party-voters/

    Did make me wonder whether the Tories made the wrong tactical call on AV now that the Right is split too – depends how willing Remain voters would have been to transfer between LD/Green/Lab.

  6. “FPTP gives Labour that capacity to backslide on Brexit though. They were elected promising to do it but now many Lab MPs call themselves a “remain party”… This is possible since there’s essentially only one socialist / social democrat party and its position on Brexit is up for internal dispute, subject to any electoral constraints a possible policy imposes. There are costs to departing from the manifesto but also potential rewards. In a more proportional system, where there were both Brexit-supporting and remain-supporting left-wing parties, they’d be more likely to stick to their inherent positions, which would be more deeply ingrained than disposable manifesto commitments.”

    The proof your argument is determined by how well eurosceptics are served by the PR systems on the continent, and if anything they are worse off than we are. Its not the voting systems that are preventing the emergence of political parties that represent all the views of the voters, its the dominance of politics and public life by the Political Class – they will not allow interlopers, regardless of what voting system is in place.

  7. @Jim

    Not sure about that as a comparison – truth is Britain is more eurosceptic than other EU members therefore ought to have had stronger eurosceptic representation in parliament. Yet until the Tory pivot under Johnson/May there has not been significant parliamentary representation for an expressly pro-Brexit political party since… I guess mid-1980s Labour? Other than that euroscepticism has pretty much only been represented at Westminster on the back benches (there’s Howard and Hague and IDS as opposition leaders but they were largely opposed to new integration and had only limited preference for unwinding existing arrangements).

    Sweden, Finland, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands and others have had explicitly eurosceptic parties represented in their parliament, and in Hungary, Italy, Poland and the Czech Republic they have even tasted power, though admittedly that’s using “euroscepticism” a bit loosely to cover a range of parties and preferences.

    More strikingly, Iceland and Norway have parties explicitly opposed to EU membership (as well as parties in favour) even on different parts of the political spectrum, and that’s been sufficient – with the help of the odd referendum – to keep them out of the EU. That level of choice I’m a bit jealous of.

  8. I’m not so sure it will take that long for violence to break out. We are a different country now and when we talk about the British stiff upper lip it doesn’t really apply to those under 30 who are more likely to put cream on it to loosen it up a bit.

  9. “I’m not so sure it will take that long for violence to break out. We are a different country now and when we talk about the British stiff upper lip it doesn’t really apply to those under 30 who are more likely to put cream on it to loosen it up a bit.”

    Not only that we’ve had 40+ years of learning by example that violence gets your cause noticed, and indeed listened to, and changes made……..see Irish nationalists and Muslims.

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