Willow Talk

With great power comes great responsibility:

One-word oxymoron: polyfidelitous. Yep, it’s another self-justifying polyamorite. Someone hit that big red Tim Newman alarm button.

So let’s take a look:

Willow noted that because divorce rates are so high, it suggests that there is something left to be desired when it comes to traditional relationship structures in the modern age. She expressed that polyamory would probably be more common if couples could let go of their own fear of losing ownership their partners:

Right, but:

Yesterday, on the latest episode of Red Table Talk, 18-year-old Willow Smith kept it a buck about how she really feels about monogamy, and challenged us to see it differently.

We’re supposed to take relationship advice from an 18-year old? One who says:

My last relationship was fueled by jealousy and blind rage; checking each other’s phones and fighting about our findings, angry at social media interactions and flirty onlookers alike. It took me a while to realize that weren’t in love, we were in possession of one another, totally and completely.

Such wisdom! The irony is that Willow Smith is the daughter of Will Smith and Jada Pinkett, who have been married for 22 years. Given her father’s looks and popularity, and considering the usual longevity of Hollywood marriages, perhaps Willow should quit talking to gullible fools in the media and have a word with her parents about what makes a relationship work. Still, I guess taking relationship advice from teenagers is less harmful than promoting sex work to them.

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18 thoughts on “Willow Talk

  1. Will & Jada’s parenting has certainly turned out some maladjusted kids

    Re: Teen Vogue, the only explanation is that the editorial staff is entirely made up of nonces who hate kids.

  2. Re the last link, I have never ever understood this “sex work is work” thing.

    Well yes of course it is. If you write down a list of all the things that a person can do in exchange for remuneration, that’s one of them, and one of the oldest too.

    But drug dealing is also work. So is burglary. And being a professional enforcer or hitman.

    Being paid to be exhibited as a sideshow freak hammering nails through your own appendages is work. Being sent up chimneys at the age of ten is work, if you’re allowed to keep some of the money.

    There are arguments for and against legalised prostitution but “it’s work” doesn’t strike me as a particularly profound or useful one.

  3. @Tim

    Unless I’m misreading, the “one who says” bit is not actually said by Smith. That bit was by

    “Taylor Honore is a spiritually centered and equally provocative RAPtivist from Baton Rouge, Louisiana with a love for people and storytelling”

    The bits actually attributed to Smith are, if anything, weirder…

  4. I though this was going to be about England’s resounding defeat by Australia in the cricket world cup. Congratulations to Finch and all in their outstanding performance and securing a place in the finals and the best of British to England in somehow keeping it together and qualifying as well.

  5. “I love men and women equally and so I would definitely want one man, one woman. I feel like I could be polyfidelitous with those two people.”

    Telling how she occupies the centre of her own personal universe. What about the other two people? Either could want another man in their relationship. But one suspects she’s expecting them to be polyfidelitous with her

  6. But drug dealing is also work. So is burglary. And being a professional enforcer or hitman.

    Drug dealing is legal for multi-billion dollar companies and two-bit liquor stores alike, so yes, it’s also “work” in the common parlance.

    Burglary involves involuntary taking, and enforcers and hitmen – professional or otherwise – commit violence against unwilling participants.

    If sex work / prostitution / whoring involved raping people then calling it work would be disingenuous. If, however, activists wish to end the prohibition of voluntary – if unenviable and gross – commerce then calling it “work” would be one way to draw attention to the unfairness of jailing people for victimless crimes.

    On the other hand, if activists wish to destroy the family to make room for the State then pushing children into prostitution would certainly advance the cause regardless of what terms they use. But fear not, once these people have full control sex work will be illegal on the basis of being private enterprise.

  7. “I’ve a feeling there is a whole back story to will and Jada I’d rather not know about.”

    There are rumours about the state of their marriage, always quite vague about the cause though.

    I think he’s talented, and they both seem well put-together individuals in some ways. But yeah, the kids are nuts and I doubt it will serve them well in the long term.

  8. Unless I’m misreading, the “one who says” bit is not actually said by Smith.

    Probably! I confess, I didn’t put a whole lot of effort into reading the article.

  9. @Sam

    Burglary involves involuntary taking, and enforcers and hitmen – professional or otherwise – commit violence against unwilling participants.

    They’re still jobs though. Fact they’re illegal is orthogonal to that. They pay the mortgage, just job titles you likely wouldn’t put down on the building society paperwork. “Self-employed dealer in small collectibles”, “personal security contractor” maybe.

    calling it “work” would be one way to draw attention to the unfairness of jailing people for victimless crimes.

    Yeah, to be fair I can see that as an argumentative strategy, justabout. Probably more effective on a listener with a typically narrow-minded middle-class definition of “work” though!

  10. a typically narrow-minded middle-class definition of “work”

    I assumed that’s the definition you were working from honestly. I don’t consider common parlance narrow-minded, per se.

    (they’re) just job titles you likely wouldn’t put down on the building society paperwork

    Legal vs Illegal isn’t the distinction I’m making, but rather voluntary vs involuntary acts. Which is why “Self-employed dealer in small collectibles” is disingenuous, but “sex worker” is accurate and sufficiently descriptive.

    It’s all moot anyway, isn’t it? The real opposition to legalization comes from narrow-minded middle-class women, and I notice their preferences tend to be reflected in the law.

  11. Sam, don’t middle-class and upper middle-class women engage in sex in return for tennis/yoga/personal fitness lessons? How is that different from being a sex-worker?

    Asking for a friend.

    I am acquainted with a couple of Ukrainian lasses both in their 40s, but you’d never say so (one is the sister of a colleague), who work part-time as sex workers. They both seem level-headed, no nonsense, down-to-earth women unlike the screeching feminist harpies writing penny-pieces for the Guardian. Oh, and they insist on paying their way when it is their turn for a round of drinks.

  12. How is that different from being a sex-worker?

    A sex worker has the professionalism to leave you alone afterwards. Also, cheaper.

  13. @Sam

    Recreational narcotic supplier is a job, and may be legal or illegal depending on the jurisdiction. But the fact that it’s definitely a job doesn’t strike me, prima facie, as an argument in favour of its legalisation.The voluntary choice made by their customers is clearly an argument, but as far as I can see that doesn’t relate to whether it’s a job. It isn’t clear to me that most people class an act for profit as “work” or not depending on the willingness of other parties to accept that act.

    Plenty of jobs involve compelling unwilling parties to do something they don’t want to do, or imposing something upon them, and sometimes that’s with the full authorisation of the law (to varying extents, a teacher, traffic warden, policeman, bouncer, prison officer or state executioner) and other times outside it (the guys with false passports who turned up in tennis kit at Mahmoud Al-Mabhouh’s hotel just before his murder were certainly “at work” or “on a job”, and their personal pride in their professionalism was presumably unmarred by the deceased’s non-consent to being injected with succinylcholine).

    The real opposition to legalization comes from narrow-minded middle-class women, and I notice their preferences tend to be reflected in the law.

    Think there’s something in this. Funny how the Prohibition Era came so hot on the heels of women’s suffrage, isn’t it?

  14. @Sam

    But your voluntary, “free exchange” point is definitely spot-on: the argument that prostitution should be legal is, in a nutshell, that both parties consent to it, so the default position unless compelling evidence to the contrary can be found, is that it should be legal. And as a secondary point, that making it illegal has various negative knock-on effects eg regarding crime and public health, so the grounds for banning are weak. Of course people can agree or disagree with the argument, perhaps add their own angles on it too, but “it’s work” seems more to me about addressing stigma, while being almost entirely peripheral to the “should it be legal” debate.

  15. I’ve worked for HCL. I don’t rate them at all. They do have a small minority of good people but most of them are barely acceptable at best. And their project and quality management is appalling.

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