Diversity Granny

A couple of years ago I wrote a post about a police officer by the name of Maggie Blyth who was about to become Portsmouth’s district commissioner despite having been in the job only a year. Well, she’s back in the news again, for much the same reason:

A police officer who has been on the force for just three years, has been promoted to one of the most senior ranks – despite having only arrested between 10 to 15 people during her career.

Maggie Blyth has just started work as assistant chief constable with Wiltshire Police, in charge of specialist operations, armed response and dog units across the entire force.

As I said last time:

There was a time when those seeking the higher echelons of an organisation would have to demonstrate both competence and time served. The former requirement was dropped some time ago in favour of blind obedience to one’s superiors, but at least they would be expected to do the necessary time. But the modern organisation has an image to project and diversity quotas to fill, and can’t hang around for years waiting for its golden boys and girls to obtain knowledge through experience. Instead they’re sent on a whirlwind tour of the organisation, spending barely a few weeks in one department before moving onto the next, so that at the end of the period the individual knows just enough about each part to be able to interfere and f*** things up once they’re in charge.

Leading CJ Nerd to link to this wonderful Dilbert cartoon. So where do we think Diversity Granny will go from here? Head of the Met?

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11 thoughts on “Diversity Granny

  1. I don’t suppose anyone here has a subscription to policinginisghts.com do they?

    Maggie has written 2 articles there about ‘Direct Entry’ into the police, which I’m sure we could play woke-word bingo with.

    https://policinginsight.com/author/maggie/

    Her profile is below, which rather proves Tim’s point:

    With a background in the Probation Service in the early 1990s Maggie developed offender education provision across Inner London and subsequently spent five years as a senior policy adviser at the Youth Justice Board. She was responsible for the roll out of youth justice qualifications for 10,000 staff and inquiries into child custodial deaths and oversight of practice across YOTs in England and Wales. Over recent years Maggie was Independent Chair of Safeguarding Children Boards, most notably Kent, Oxfordshire and Hampshire & Isle Wight, with oversight of local child protection services. She held a Ministerial appointment with the Parole Board for England and Wales till 2016, a quasi- judicial role with responsibility for the prison release of high risk offenders, and was a specialist chair for juvenile cases. Maggie has published 5 volumes relating to child protection and youth justice and worked across the UK and internationally to develop services.With a background in the Probation Service in the early 1990s Maggie developed offender education provision across Inner London and subsequently spent five years as a senior policy adviser at the Youth Justice Board. She was responsible for the roll out of youth justice qualifications for 10,000 staff and inquiries into child custodial deaths and oversight of practice across YOTs in England and Wales. Over recent years Maggie was Independent Chair of Safeguarding Children Boards, most notably Kent, Oxfordshire and Hampshire & Isle Wight, with oversight of local child protection services. She held a Ministerial appointment with the Parole Board for England and Wales till 2016, a quasi- judicial role with responsibility for the prison release of high risk offenders, and was a specialist chair for juvenile cases. Maggie has published 5 volumes relating to child protection and youth justice and worked across the UK and internationally to develop services.

  2. She sounds like one of those over-credentialed egghead pencil-pusher types. All book learning and no practical experience of being an actual cop. Yet she’s in charge of cops. It makes no sense. It seems like a recipe for getting cops killed, but then after reading articles here about them cowering in their cars and policing twitter from their desks, maybe the police force has degenerated to the point where this won’t harm their lives. I can’t see this being very good for the actual citizenry, though.

  3. “…in charge of specialist operations, armed response and dog units across the entire force.”

    “So, in line with National Guidelines and the necessity of operating within a reduced envelope of resource forced upon us by budgetary constraints, I have decided to rationalise and restructure our provision by issuing the firearms to the dogs.. “

  4. “So where do we think Diversity Granny will go from here? Head of the Met?”

    Not yet! AFAIAA she hasn’t actually been responsible (as Gold Commander) for the killing of unarmed Brazilian electricians.

  5. Not yet! AFAIAA she hasn’t actually been responsible (as Gold Commander) for the killing of unarmed Brazilian electricians.

    That’s the problem with fast-track careers, you don’t have time to murder any innocents through sheer panic and incompetence.

  6. Wouldn’t it be great if anyone could put his/her/xer hand on his/her/xer heart and state that this kind of “gonads before competence & experience” promotion would stop as soon as those guys in Brussels are out of the picture?

  7. Anyone a fan of Gilbert and Sullivan?

    HMS Pinafore has a character called Sir Joseph Porter, loosely based on the real life William Henry Smith.

    I see parallels here. We need a modern day Gilbert and Sullivan to poke fun.

  8. She’s probably safer in this ‘strategic’ and ‘political’ role, than in a day to day command, like the sergeant or inspector who needs to deploy boots on the ground and therefore needs to understand operational risks. At the higher levels it’s more abstract, the risk of immediate life threatening failure is higher when it comes to ‘on the ground’ decision making.

    I’ve written this before, but it is a feature of ‘managerialism’ (generic, interchangeable management techniques) that people in senior positions can have limited tacit understanding of ground reality, but it’s generally not done in safety critical roles for simple reason it can take months or even years for a magnificently remunerated managerialist to run an organisation into the ground with ignorant decisions, but it only takes five minutes for the guy on the ground earning a fraction of that money to destroy an organisation by doing something they don’t understand. That’s why a management consultant might be made CEO of a hospital, but they won’t be allowed to change a patient IV feed.

  9. Will any white males now join the Police Service? If you are not blocked for promotion for your race and/or gender you will eventually see Common Purpose graduates parachuted in to deny you any chance of reaching the top.

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