Snobbery instead of governance

The BBC, two days late, decides to run a front-page story on Trump and the WWI commemorations (which I wrote about here):

The White House has defended US President Donald Trump’s decision to miss a memorial event on Saturday after he faced a backlash.

Mr Trump, who was in France to mark the centenary of World War One’s end, cancelled a visit to a US military cemetery because it was raining.

Bad weather and “near-zero visibility” grounded the presidential helicopter, White House officials said.

French, German and Canadian leaders attended memorial events on Saturday.

However, Mr Trump was reluctant to bring extra disruption to Paris traffic for a last-minute motorcade, his officials said.

So it was a security issue then and not, as many pretended, that Trump simply couldn’t be bothered because it was raining.

“President Trump did not want to cause that kind of unexpected disruption to the city and its people,” press secretary Sarah Sanders said, noting the trip was 60 miles (96km) north-east of Paris

Compiègne, the location of the ceremony in question, is situated a little further east of Charles de Gaulle airport and if he were to get there from Paris via motorcade they’d probably have closed the A1. This not only would have caused havoc on the périphérique but might have caused people to miss their flights, so I expect the good citizens of Paris are rather glad Trump decided not to go. Also, there is no acknowledgement that this particular ceremony was a sideshow: the main one took place on 11th November on the Champs-Élysées as normal, and Trump was in full attendance.

From here, it just gets pathetic:

Critics observed how Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau had travelled 118 miles outside Paris to attend a ceremony – in the rain – at a cemetery in Vimy.

And what is the security operation surrounding the Canadian PM versus that of the US president?

Notable criticism came from British Defence Minister Tobias Ellwood, who took an apparent swipe at the president on Twitter, saying “rain did not prevent our brave heroes from doing their job”.

I’ve praised the bravery of Tobias Ellwood on this blog before, but he’s acting like a child here. So is this man:

His comments followed a scathing rebuke from Sir Nicholas Soames, a grandson of the wartime British leader Sir Winston Churchill.

The MP tweeted that Mr Trump was not fit to represent the US and said that he was a “pathetic inadequate” for not defying the weather “to pay his respects to the fallen”.

Here’s what I don’t get about the British ruling classes. Half of them want to suck up to European technocrats which explains their anti-Americanism, but even those that want out of Europe seem to make extra effort to antagonise their most important ally. It’s fine that Britain wants to get out of Europe, but where’s the value in MPs taking swipes at Trump on Twitter over trivial, wrongheaded stuff like this? America has lots of allies and special interests, and Britain needs American support more than America needs Britain. The ruling classes fell over themselves to brown-nose Obama who hated Britain, but even though Trump has repeatedly shown he’s open to warm relations with Britain, the ruling classes prefer to engage in petty sniping.

I expect the answer lies in snobbery. Even the supposedly better Tories prefer to burnish their credentials with other members of the ruling classes by virtue-signaling against Trump’s supposed rudeness and inadequacy than building workable relations with the one country whose help we need once we stumble out of the EU in March next year. Once again, our ruling classes have shown they are utterly incapable of doing the one thing they exist to do: govern. If Britain wants to avoid disappearing into irrelevance, it needs a wholesale replacement of those in charge. The only upside I can see is that I doubt Trump paid any attention to these cretins.

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22 thoughts on “Snobbery instead of governance

  1. It’s not snobbery its globalism. Nationalism, in today’s times, is the refusal to sacrifice your nation’s independence and liberty to an all-powerful and unaccountable world body, be it the League of Nations, the UN or the EU or similar. Its globalism that betrays patriotism.

    The Great War was a terrible thing that wiped out a lot of what was great about Europe, its people, its society and its culture, it wasn’t caused by nationalism, it was engineered by globalists, decades in advance working on both sides to break up the people and steer them towards a world government.

    The recent criticism from that French faggot and the classless bush pig Frau towards Trump and Putin for that matter, is because they are the ones trying to end or stop wars and it is no coincidence that they are both nationalists.

    Globalists everywhere hate the pair of them.

  2. “President Trump did not want to cause that kind of unexpected disruption to the city and its people,” press secretary Sarah Sanders said, noting the trip was 60 miles (96km) north-east of Paris”

    I’m not pro- or anti-Trump, but really, this is all just last minute running around looking for justifications, however weak, that the public will accept long enough for the news cycle to move on.

    It wasn’t ‘near zero visibility’ nor was it ‘I didn’t want to burden the traffic’ (if so then he’d have just stayed home in the first place).

    Guy didn’t want to go out in the rain to yet *another* ceremony to cover the same things at the other ceremonies. But you can’t say that openly. Because someone will take offense.

    And really, was there any point in him going anyway? To commemorate not millions of lives lost because the schemes of the European elite went bad but because ‘they were defending FREEDOM!’ And to commemorate even that alongside the leaders of modern day France and Germany – two countries bound and determined to eliminate freedom and enshrine a new pan-European elite?

    Maybe he should have gone, maybe he shouldn’t – but both sides are talking out their arses.

  3. Trump’s in a damned if he does, damned if he doesn’t situation.

    Since the helicopters couldn’t fly, imagine the howling if he had blocked the A1 and people had indeed missed flights at CdG as a result, with the ever-neutral media shoving microphones in their faces and putting their vox pops on the 6 o’clock news.

  4. Churchill for all his faults was a titan, his grandson, just another metro elite wet fart who care nothing for England or its future outside of Europe.

  5. The MP tweeted that Mr Trump was not fit to represent the US and said that he was a “pathetic inadequate” for not defying the weather “to pay his respects to the fallen”.

    Says the guy that can’t even get his leafy constituency’s trains remotely running on time or daily and has overseen said clusterf___ for several years. To the billionaire alpha male businessman and world leader with the hot wife.

    Inadequate? Projection.

  6. PS:

    “pathetic inadequate”

    Back when I used to use Twatter, said MP blocked me after being mildly criticised.

    Pathetic? Projection.

  7. “millions of lives lost because the schemes of the European elite”

    To think that Europe’s best men of the time were forced to take sides due to an accident of birth and go out and kill each other at their behest and all of this unnecessary fighting, killing and destruction was done for what reason?

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/C-Tc7eIUIAAPY0S.jpg

  8. “And what is the security operation surrounding the Canadian PM versus that of the US president?”

    The latter needs a motorcade of armoured vehicles and extensive secret service operations, whereas the former needs to be strapped into his buggy and told to not talk with any adults who approach him.

  9. “His comments followed a scathing rebuke from Sir Nicholas Soames, a grandson of the wartime British leader Sir Winston Churchill.”

    In this case, I can unhappily state I know this particular grandson of the wartime British leader Sir Winston Churchill, personally. And can report the only characteristic he shares with grandad is being an MP. Or if you prefer, he’s a fat lazy lump of lard who has nothing going for him but his pedigree certificate & his overwhelming sense of self importance. When I knew him he was close personal friend & Equerry to Jug-Ears. Which says everything you need to know.

  10. Even if everything that they say about Trump were true, it wouldn’t change my view that he is better than Clinton. This is because unlike Clinton he would not let any Rotherham style grooming gangs happen in the US.

    BTW I do wonder why our MPs would rather insult him than ask for a trade deal so we can put massive tariffs on French Wine in case the EU tries to punish us. Snobbery in this case is very expensive.

  11. Incidentally, there’s some sort of implication here that Trump failed to show up at an American War Cemetery, where the Macron/Merkle gig was taking place.
    Rang a bell. The US cemeteries in the area are at Bony & Seringes-et-Nesles. Both in Dept Aisne. Both a good 60km hike over from Compiègne in the Oise.
    But if he went to a WW1 US cemetery, near Paris, the nearest is Seringes-et-Nesles. So a tad harder to get to than Compiègne. Which is just off the A1 autoroute.
    Maybe he just put paying respects to dead US soldiers higher than hobnobbing with the representatives of the nations got them killed. Particularly as one of said has been talking about declaring war on the US, of late.

  12. bloomberg covered this story with the following headlines

    “Trump Mocks France for War Losses as Macron Bromance Sours (3)”
    “But in a particularly sharp jab, Trump implied that the French needed the U.S. to rescue them from the Germans in both world wars.”

    in the quoted tweets he doesn’t do the first
    am pretty sure the second is true and the crowds in 1945 were welcoming the americans not telling them everything was ok and they could go home.

  13. @Sam Vara on November 13, 2018 at 1:57 pm

    +1

    Trudea also
    needs to stopped from playing dress-up, singing and dancing.

  14. @Tim N

    Here’s what I don’t get about the British ruling classes. Half of them want to suck up to European technocrats which explains their anti-Americanism, but even those that want out of Europe seem to make extra effort to antagonise their most important ally. It’s fine that Britain wants to get out of Europe, but where’s the value in MPs taking swipes at Trump on Twitter over trivial, wrongheaded stuff like this? America has lots of allies and special interests, and Britain needs American support more than America needs Britain. The ruling classes fell over themselves to brown-nose Obama who hated Britain, but even though Trump has repeatedly shown he’s open to warm relations with Britain, the ruling classes prefer to engage in petty sniping.

    I expect the answer lies in snobbery. Even the supposedly better Tories prefer to burnish their credentials with other members of the ruling classes by virtue-signaling against Trump’s supposed rudeness and inadequacy than building workable relations with the one country whose help we need once we stumble out of the EU in March next year. Once again, our ruling classes have shown they are utterly incapable of doing the one thing they exist to do: govern. If Britain wants to avoid disappearing into irrelevance, it needs a wholesale replacement of those in charge. The only upside I can see is that I doubt Trump paid any attention to these cretins.

    Spot on the sniping at and insulting of Trump by May, Cabinet and MPs down is monumentally stupid and potentially very damaging for UK.

    Trump is by far the most pro-UK POTUS in living memory and has repeatedly offered UK trade deals.

    Trump does pay attention to these cretins and remembers. He now holds May & Macron in contempt.

  15. Britain really needs a friendly US President at the moment as the EU elites will never rest until they punish Britain for Brexit. If they keep insulting Trump the way they have been it just gives him more reasons to concentrate on the Asia/Pacific region and leave Europe to it’s own devices. It’s not like the US needs Europe for anything!, changing focus would also save the US a lot of money, pull out of NATO and let the EU form the army they keep talking about. What could go wrong?

  16. And what is the security operation surrounding the Canadian PM versus that of the US president?

    We’re mostly hoping that someone takes a shot and if the security detail claims they were distracted by a car backfire in the vicinity, no one’s going to look too closely at that.

    It’s why we sent Kevin Vickers out of country.

  17. ” … Our ruling classes have shown they are utterly incapable of doing the one thing they exist to do: govern. If Britain wants to avoid disappearing into irrelevance, it needs a wholesale replacement of those in charge.”

    The money shot, Tim. As anyone who has ever done anything engineering-related (or software-related, for that matter) knows, occasionally a system becomes unfit for purpose and has to be ripped-out and replaced in its entirety. Doubtless you encountered it when you worked in the oil industry. And, as you have pointed out, that just about sums up the current British elite.

  18. Source for above:
    https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/progress-on-the-uks-exit-from-and-future-relationship-with-the-european-union

    Opion:

    The customs union would apply indefinitely to the whole of the UK and Britain could not be able to walk away from the arrangement without approval from an ‘independent panel’ made up of civil servants from the EU and Britain

    This would effectively last for ever, as Brussels will have no incentive to negotiate a replacement deal.

    In PMQs Corbyn asked May “Can MPs vote to leave customs union in future?

    May: waffle. That’s a No then.

    Brussels EU & Civil servants will rule UK

    The craven PM May excuse for a woman has surrendered UK to indefinite rule by EU.

    May is worse than Chamberlain

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