The Desert Sun Podcast #002

I’ve done another podcast, hopefully with improved sound quality. Having listened to it, I probably talk too fast in the last section and haven’t structured the talk as well as I could, but I wasn’t going to re-do the whole thing. As I said, I’m learning as I go and hopefully I’ll get better.

So this time I’m talking about my experiences as a young manager in the oil industry, and how big companies don’t prepare their employees for management roles. You can listen to it on iTunes here (it may take a while to appear), download it here, or listen on the blog by clicking the link below:

Are there any other podcast services people want me to upload it to?

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9 thoughts on “The Desert Sun Podcast #002

  1. Very good Tim. You made some excellent points, even if he who knoweth everything, fails to agree.

    From a personal standpoint I was extremely lucky for most of my career to have managers who knew how to manage. I found that the higher up the chain of command my boss was, the better manager they were. In the job I held for over half my career, my boss was a Vice President who reported to the CEO. He was the best boss I ever had.

  2. @Fay

    I haven’t listened to the podcast yet but I have also found that the higher echelons of most organizations do have very astute professionals with tremendous energy levels, thresholds for stress and a knack for success, which is something that we should all try and replicate if we wish to improve our business performance levels if you are going to copy, copy the top men.

    The biggest lesson that I have learned is to quickly distinguish between the entrepreneurial and professional executive, they are both there and quite necessary to a healthy challenging business brains trust, although they don’t introduce themselves as such nor do they have type labels on their foreheads and each of them will have completely different expectations of you, to the extent that you may need to have two frequency settings in your single role.

    The fatal hazard that I have seen many colleagues succumb to and therefore fail in the business setting is not managing the entrepreneur type, they are fucking deadly and all powerful if you cross them, not psycho like, but my way or the highway type and none of this is in the manual.

  3. @Bardon

    “…I have also found that the higher echelons of most organizations do have very astute professionals with tremendous energy levels, thresholds for stress and a knack for success, which is something that we should all try and replicate if we wish to improve our business performance levels if you are going to copy, copy the top men.”

    Absolutely agree.

  4. Good podcast. Yes, the sound quality is not brilliant, but quite good enough for your purposes. It’s not as if you are singing operatic arias. And there is thank god a minimum of umming and erring. I swear lots of podcasters must never listen to their end product.
    I guess I’m one of those first-managerial-responsibility-at-fortysomething guys you were talking about. And yes, I was lousy at it but for all the opposite reasons, being conflict-averse and wanting to please everyone all the time. No kids, so didn’t even start with toddler-wrangling skills. But your general point stands – you can’t entrust serious management responsibilities to managerial virgins.

    Come to think of it, explains why mining, at least in my part of the world, is very keen on ex-services people. The sergeants and lieutenants in their 20s have had more practical people-management experience than most people their age in the civilian sector.

  5. The sound quality was far better than Quillette’s debut podcast; they interviewed Jordan Peterson while he was scuba diving under the ice sheets of Enceladus, by the sounds of it.

  6. Good job, Tim – sound, while not perfect, definitely falls inside the ‘more than good enough’ category, so I think you’ve reached an acceptable compromise.

    Your speaking voice and delivery sounded better – in fact if you were speaking ex tempore you’ve done very well indeed, with a commendable lack of ums and ahs; if you were reading from a script you’ve also done very well as it doesn’t sound like it.

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