A Milestone on a Dark Road

I’ll give it to the Democrats, they play to win and don’t break ranks. The Republicans, by contrast, are split between complete losers who haven’t got over the fact that Trump beat Jeb Bush to the nomination and those who ought not to be losing but somehow always manage to. Sure enough, rather than wrap up the entire farce by confirming Kavanaugh in the Senate, the Republicans have decided to ask the FBI to investigate what they’ve been saying all week doesn’t need investigating, and the FBI can’t even if they wanted to. We’ve at least moved forward a little bit, the senate committee voting 11-10 to put Kavanaugh’s nomination to the Senate, but the reason why we’re delaying indefinitely while the FBI does it’s stuff is because some hysterical women were mean to Jeff Flake, a senator from Arizona who claims to be Republican:

Now Jeff Flake had never met this woman before; he is not responsible for whatever happened to her, assuming anything did. There is no excuse whatsoever for cornering someone in a lift and screaming at them like this, and a serious man would have ordered her to shut up and get the hell out of his way. Instead, he stood there and let himself be verbally abused before wringing his hands and asking for an FBI investigation into Kavanaugh in return for securing his vote in the Senate. If so-called Republicans are voting for people like this, and the Republican party is happy to have him in their tent, then they deserve to have Democrats are running rings around them. By delaying the vote further, the Republicans are handing the Democrats the victory they sought when they first raised the name of Christine Blasey Ford. That Trump has acquiesced to this demand beggars belief. I expected better from him.

I watched some of Ford’s testimony and she came across as reasonable a person as you could hope to meet in California. She certainly didn’t come across as a deranged harridan, anyway. The problem was, she couldn’t remember anything except that it was Kavanaugh that assaulted her. Coincidentally, this is the one and only detail the Democrats think important. There’s no chance Kavanaugh did assault her – there isn’t a shred of evidence to support the claim, and plenty to suggest he didn’t – and unless she’s simply being paid, there must be some other motive. If I were to guess, I’d say Ford had been sexually abused and has never got over it. She probably even knows who did it, and loathes herself; in all likelihood she got too close to him because he whispered the right political viewpoints in her ear. Then with some seriously warped logic she’s sought relief by accusing Kavanaugh, someone she thinks represents the man who assaulted her and she’s so messed up she can’t see the difference. If she can bring down the man who is about to reverse Roe v Wade, her dignity will be restored. It’s borderline insanity, but then look at that woman in the lift.

I also watched a fair bit of Kavanaugh’s testimony, and before it started everyone was saying he cannot come across as smug and arrogant or he’s toast as Ford’s was a tough act to follow. They needn’t have worried: he was mad as hell, as anyone in his shoes would be. Bear in mind the original accusation was he’d tried to take off Ford’s bathing suit which was under her clothes. By the time he testified, thousands of people were openly calling him a rapist and newspapers were running articles on how he organised gang rapes of teenage girls based on fantastical stories from professional liars and attention-seekers. He then broke down in tears, which delighted the liberals who mocked him, ridiculed him, and said this meant he is unsuitable to serve on the Supreme Court (as if any behaviour on Kavanaugh’s part would have satisfied them).

The conservative response to Ford’s testimony, at least on Twitter, was a broad agreement that she came across okay. The liberal reaction to Kavanaugh was to ramp up the scorn and abuse to eleven. We now have national newspapers implying he’s a paedophile. For the Republicans to now delay his confirmation further is nothing short of betrayal, both for Kavanaugh and decent Americans. Half the problem is their supporters are so limp-wristed and dim that they still believe the Democrats are acting in good faith and will be satisfied once the FBI investigation is complete. Anyone with half a brain knows they’ll never be satisfied, and next week a slew of accusations will come forth that Kavanaugh ran a secret underground kidnapping ring which murdered children and sold off their body parts. And conservatives will um and ah and say perhaps it’s better we nominate someone else, a woman who the Democrats will have to accept. Good lord, they’re thick. As I said, say what you like about the liberals but they at least they turn up to the fight and bring all weapons to bear; the Republicans seem only capable of surrendering before they’ve even put the gloves on.

Regardless, this is a seriously worrying development in American politics. Right from the start the Democrats decided they were not going to allow Trump to have a second Supreme Court pick and they vowed to oppose anyone he chose. It beats me why they even bothered to have the senate hearings at all, if the Democrats had decided before anyone was even nominated they were going to vote no. Perhaps the only purpose is to flush out dithering Republicans? Between this and the hysterical reaction to Trump’s election, which shows no sign of abating, it’s clear the liberals don’t want to take part in any political process they’re not in charge of. Whether in or out of power, it’s equally clear they don’t want to make any compromises or even live around those they consider their enemies. The ZMan is fond of saying there is no way back towards reconciliation, and that some sort of separation is the only solution. Watching the Kavanaugh debacle plumb new depths over the past few days, I can only agree with him. This morning I came across this video:

Any society in which women approach men they don’t know and jab fingers in their face while screaming hysterically is not going to last very long. Egged on by one another, Democrat politicians and their lunatic supporters are slowly pushing ordinary people into a corner from which the only escape will be overwhelming violence of the sort not seen since the guns fell silent in 1865. Any decent book on the American Civil War takes a couple of hundred pages before the shooting starts because it was a long, slow march towards it, full of incidents both big and small which shoved the country a little further along each time. Philip Scott Thomas on Twitter specifically mentioned the caning of Charles Sumner, an incident widely considered to be symbolic of the breakdown of civil discourse. Will the treatment meted out to Brett Kavanaugh and his family, which is still ongoing, be seen in a similar light in years to come? Perhaps not, but I am certain it will be one of several milestones on a road which is inexorably leading towards violence and tragedy.

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34 thoughts on “A Milestone on a Dark Road

  1. If I were to guess, I’d say Ford had been sexually abused and has never got over it. […] If she can bring down the man who is about to reverse Roe v Wade, her dignity will be restored.

    And so the student becomes the master.

  2. It certainly amazes me that these bints are so trusting that the people they vent their fury on aren’t actually the people they accuse them of being. I can think of quite a few blokes, confronted by that lot, would have banged her head against the wall a few times & stepped out over the body. Eventually she’s quite likely to bump into one and then it won’t be imaginary grievances she’ll be wailing about.

  3. Translated for UK:

    “Good lord, they’re thick. As I said, say what you like about Labour but they at least they turn up to the fight and bring all weapons to bear; the Conservatives seem only capable of surrendering before they’ve even put the gloves on.”

  4. “If I were to guess, I’d say Ford had been sexually abused and has never got over it.”

    #MeToo, to coin a phrase. It seems that nearly every woman who elbows her way into the political/media spotlight has been sexually abused. They either say as much, or their behaviour leads one to think that it can be the only explanation for their tone and derangement. So much of what passes for political discourse now sounds like that poor wretched woman at the lift door: it starts with practised slogans, and then the voice breaks and we are listening to howling misdirected anger.

    The media are going crazy trying to stop rapists and sexual abusers from getting into positions of power. Has anyone considered we might be better off if we barred their victims from such positions?

  5. Shorter Flake: “Hey, maybe if we pay the Danes their Danegeld, they’ll leave us alone like they promised!”

    Still, you know what they say: Against stupidity, the gods themselves struggle in vain.

  6. I have seen the theory floated that Kavanaugh is not Trump’s first choice and that he is acting as a stalking horse. If He backs down on Kavanaugh and allows the left to expend their time, effort and energies on blocking him, then he can introduce his preferred candidate and have that person nominated more quickly and easier than Kavanaugh. Trump is a wily and multi level player so it’s plausible …

    There are a lot of reports coming out of the US that are saying that the disgust of normal people will push them to vote Republican because of this. So it will be interesting to see the results of the primaries in November.

    Still, now a precedent has been set that the FBI investigates any potential Supreme Court candidate, perhaps he will now nominate Hillary Roddham Clinton or Barak Hussein Obama (both lawyers) for the Supreme Court. Let’s see what comes out of THAT investigation, eh? >};o)

  7. I have seen the theory floated that Kavanaugh is not Trump’s first choice and that he is acting as a stalking horse. If He backs down on Kavanaugh and allows the left to expend their time, effort and energies on blocking him, then he can introduce his preferred candidate and have that person nominated more quickly and easier than Kavanaugh. Trump is a wily and multi level player so it’s plausible …

    If that’s the case, Trump’s leaving it pretty close to the elections to bring this new candidate forward.

  8. Phil B – my favourite Trump-as-five-dimensional-chess-player theory is that he’s using this as a distraction while he prepares something the Democrats really won’t like.

    The truth is probably that everybody involved on the Republican side isn’t up to snuff.

    For instance: they definitely knew this was coming (long story), and what did they do to prepare? They got some female friends of Kavanaugh to write a letter saying that they always thought he was a gentleman. Big fucking deal.

    Re: Kavanaugh-as-stalking-horse: if you don’t think the Democrats will shamelessly repeat their behaviour for the next candidate, you’re underestimating them, their voters, and their allies, the press.

  9. “I’ll give it to the Democrats, they play to win and don’t break ranks. The Republicans, by contrast, are split between complete losers who haven’t got over the fact that Trump beat Jeb Bush to the nomination and those who ought not to be losing but somehow always manage to. ”

    It’s the same in the UK. There’s no-one going to war on the left. And I’m not just talking about winning the next election. I’m talking about winning the battle and then destroying their institutions and changing minds.

    And scrapping these institutions would be a good thing, generally. Take DFID. It’s a giant waste of money. That means money taken out of productive people’s pockets and handed to elite lefties. If we scrapped it the worst possible case is that the public save money, But it also has the effect of destroying government jobs and then you change people’s incentives. After a few years in the private sector, they’ll not want a big government pouring money into civil servants.

    The problem with the Conservatives don’t get this. They could have easily taken an axe to the chaff in government. The only people who would have cared would have been the guardian, and well, f**k em. They’re never going to vote for you.

  10. “Still, now a precedent has been set that the FBI investigates any potential Supreme Court candidate” This isn’t a precedent. The FBI has always done a background investigation of anyone appointed to a high Federal office.
    Also, Flake chose not to run for re-election (he probably judged, correctly, that he could not win re-nomination). His term ends next January.

  11. The thing that really gets to me about the right in America is the constant fall back to “at least we have our guns”. And when I ask what fucking good they are locked safety away and unused, they get evasive. They are always ready for some future scenario that funnily enough never seems to arrive. Guys, your country is being stolen by evil people. If you don’t take personal risks and personal responsibility for stopping that, then you deserve to be stomped on. It’s not someone else’s problem to fix, it’s yours.

  12. Mr Black, I tend to agree with you. They fight like hell for the 2nd, but concede on so much else.

  13. Pingback: Trump may be cleverer than the media realises, but he’s not playing 7-dimensional Vulcan chess – Hector Drummond

  14. Mr Black is right. The “future scenario” is what is happening now. It has begun and no-one seems to get it.

  15. PB is right about Mr Black being right.

    The 2A dispute often seems more theatre than anything else: a Dem pops up with legislation about magazine capacity or ‘barrel shrouds’ and Republicans make a big show of opposing it; but I suspect neither party cares either way about the 2A as it appears increasingly clear that ‘the People’ harbour no great desire to refresh that ‘tree of liberty’ with the ‘blood of patriots and tyrants’.

    They watched Ruby Ridge and did nothing. They watched Waco and did nothing. They watched Oregon and did nothing. They watched Philando Castile and Daniel Shaver and did nothing. And what all those incidents show is that USG and their police can cut every gun-owner out from the herd and waste him with impunity. As long as USG doesn’t do it all at once, they can take people down one or two at a time. Every one of those incidents is the ‘I am Spartacus’ moment, and a fair portion of Americans (and they’re not all SJWs) have gone: ‘Yup, he’s Spartacus, that guy over there. F*** that guy.’

    That said, if the SHTF/Collapse comes within our lifetimes, they’ll be better placed to defend themselves against the Orcs than the average Brit.

  16. In the UK, a lot of people feel that the Conservative Party needs to die and be buried, so it can be replaced with a proper centre-right party. (I agree with them – and I was a card-carrying Conservative in the 80s. At election time I used to go knocking on doors and pushing leaflets through letterboxes.) And I’m starting to think the same is true of the Republicans in the US.

  17. Do so agree with Schrodinger’s Dog, there. The Tory Party is the enemy. With anything approaching a decent centre/centre-right party Corbyn’s Labour would be a string of lost deposits. They shouldn’t even figure. But when you’re down to a far left party & an even further left party…

  18. Translated for UK:

    That’s true to a point, but the better comparison is between the American liberals Momentum/Corbynistas (who I suppose now are Labour). Unlike the American liberals, the British left is split with most of them wringing their hands that some proper lefties have shown up and are doing what lefties have always done, only more crudely than Blair’s lot. By contrast, the supposedly moderate American liberals are four-square behind the lunatics. Britain’s centre-left remind me a lot of the Republicans, actually: they seem to think it’s just a matter of time before a new leader comes along and everything goes back to how things were.

  19. Sorry Tim, I’m not buying your childhood trauma theory. California is causation enough.

    The Republicans play Emily Post (so nice and polite) when they should be playing Flora Poste (Cold Comfort Farm). Aunt Ada Doom (aka the Democrats) needs to learn there isn’t something narsty in the woodshed.

  20. I don’t think Trump is playing multi dimensional chess, but he does have a major advantage over most if not all of his rivals. He’s spent a lifetime paying attention to people who are neither politicians nor pundits. Most of the latter seem to talk amongst themselves. That gives him a better feel for what the non-politicians want and how they will respond to given information. And they are the ones who decide elections.

  21. The thing that really gets to me about the right in America is the constant fall back to “at least we have our guns”. And when I ask what fucking good they are locked safety away and unused, they get evasive.

    That’s an excellent point. What good is the second amendment when Antifa are smacking people over the head with bike-locks unimpeded?

  22. Has anyone considered we might be better off if we barred their victims from such positions?

    As a psychiatrist acquaintance once opined, they’re like rabid dogs. It’s not their fault that they’re rabid, but they’re still too dangerous to keep around.

    What good is the second amendment when Antifa are smacking people over the head with bike-locks unimpeded?

    First of all, a violent reaction is exactly what the left wants. It’s part of the Alinsky playbook: pressure your target until they react irrationally or violently, then use that reaction to further delegitimize them and ideally use the state to suppress them.

    Second, this is very much a “if you’re going to shoot at the King, best not miss” situation. There’s publicly available video of Yvette Felarca pummeling a man at a California protest in front of a line of cops for several minutes while he berates the police for doing nothing. Which they continue to do. After eight years of President Obama, much of the nation’s law enforcement apparatus has been compromised, and arguably much of the military as well. If the second shot heard ’round the world gets fired, it is far from certain which side the police and the military will be on. Starting a civil war you’re not likely to win is not what anyone has in mind.

  23. I said right from the beginning that Trump would be a lame duck president, because of his inability to unite a fractured party. The turmoil in the White House proves that he has almost as many enemies nominally on his side as he does in the Democrats. Compare this with bumbling May who nevertheless rules her party with a rod of iron and only those with a chance of succeeding her (impossible under the US system) dare to defy her.

  24. Fascinating reference to Charles Sumner. DIdn’t know that story.

    From the top of the wiki page, I note, of course, the party affiliations of the abolitionist and the man instigating violence:

    “when Representative Preston Brooks (D-SC) used a walking cane to attack Senator Charles Sumner (R-MA), ”

    But apparently the Republicans are evil and violent.

  25. Daniel Ream, you’re quite mistaken about what the left wants. They want republicans to turn the other cheek, to be the better man and to go quietly when accused of terrible crimes. They want cost free attacks on any target they choose but they stop short of warlike provocations because they cannot do that if their enemy fights back. I can assure you that if a dozen notable leftists were shot each week at random by people who took an opportunity when it was available then leftists everywhere would be screaming for protection from big government, protection that cannot possibly be provided to the millions of vulnerable middle ranking soldiers they have. But this is the problem I noted, no one is willing to take the responsibility on themselves to oppose this latest evil and so evil advances without contest.

  26. “…and a serious man would have ordered her to shut up and get the hell out of his way.”

    No kidding. That was painful to witness. Really, what did he have to lose? He’s not running for re-election.

    I think my response would have been something along the lines of “Look, you demented cnt. I don’t know you, and don’t care whatsoever what happened to you. For all I know, you’re lying as bad as what we just saw. So get the fck off my elevator.”

    Too bad he couldn’t choke her.

  27. That’s an excellent point. What good is the second amendment when Antifa are smacking people over the head with bike-locks unimpeded?

    I’m sorry but that’s some limp wristed Brit posturing right there. “You guys can carry guns, but you don’t even kill your political enemies with them? Pussies!” Coming from a country that gave their guns to the government…gimme a break. I mean, would you rather HAVE the fucking right or continue being chastised for using a knife to defend yourself in your own home?

    Self-defense is a personal choice, not a collective action. Ruby Ridge, Waco, etc DID provoke outrage among Americans, but – here’s a fun fact – there’s 300 million of us and we’re not a monolith, and the people who were most outraged are severely outnumbered. Collectively gun owners might not stand a chance against the State’s forces, but it’s a damn sight better than trying to defend the last semblance of your rights with some scissors or whatever mildly dangerous objects your government graciously allows you to have.

    There’s a real nasty habit of Anglospherians shitting on the best efforts of the small but significant portion of Americans trying to limit government and retain our civil liberties. You can’t even throw stones from your glass houses without a fucking permit, so hows about suggesting something more constructive than Berkley, CA residents shooting Antifa protestors.

  28. Sam,

    More firearms than you’d expect in the UK, just not that many handguns.

    That said, it’s a regular refrain from the US of “how will you stand up to Evil Guvmint Tirruny without lots of guns?” – so don’t whine when it’s pointed out that “lots of guns” are at best an irrelevance to the steady takeover by the progressives.

  29. Sam: ‘Coming from a country that gave their guns to the government…
    They didn’t come for our guns overnight but gradually—just as the boiling frog of metaphor only realises too late his predicament. And it was implemented to the background of what until about the 1960s at least, was a very stable society: e.g. in 1955, psychologist and anthropologist Professor Geoffrey Gorer could write in Exploring English Character:

    In public life today, the English are certainly among the most peaceful, gentle, courteous and orderly populations that the civilised world has ever seen … You hardly ever see a fight in a bar … Football crowds are as orderly as church meetings.

    The Firearms Act 1921 was the first serious restriction on British gun ownership and while HMG enacted it due to fears of Bolshevik unrest, it was otherwise one of Britain’s safest years: the category of ‘Total Violence Against the Person’ in the Home Office’s ‘Recorded Crime Statistics 1898 – 2001/02’ (n.b. England & Wales only) when related to population size records 3.69 offences per 100,000 people that year; as compared to 5.86 in 1911, 4.99 in 1931—and 1,177.38 in 2001.

    We didn’t see the storm coming.

    As for asking us if we would like RKBA restored, as per the 1689 Bill of Rights, I suspect a few of us visiting this site would. Personally, I think the bearing of arms should be mandated following the specifically English tradition dating back to at least Henry II’s Assize of Arms of 1181. On that point, it is notable that the first version of the 1689 Bill of Rights’ clause defining bearing arms stated: ‘It is necessary for the publick Safety, that the Subjects which are Protestants, should provide and keep Arms for their common Defence,’ i.e. the centuries-old obligation of the people to form as militia in defence of the realm. However, it was watered down to, ‘That the Subjects, which are Protestants, may provide and keep Arms, for their common Defence,’ and then weakened further to its final version, ‘That the Subjects which are Protestants may have Arms for their Defence suitable to their Conditions, and as allowed by Law.
    (Further reading: Malcolm, Joyce Lee. To Keep and Bear Arms: The Origins of an Anglo-American Right. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1994.
    Malcolm, Joyce Lee. ‘The Right of the People to Keep and Bear Arms: The Common Law Tradition.’ 10 Hastings Const. L. Q. 285–314 (1983), http://www.constitution.org/mil/maltrad.htm)

    The NRA’s ‘Revolt at Cincinnati’ of 1977 is of note: it is largely thanks to those activists that the NRA was prevented from going down the same cucked road that our shooting organisations did.

    We know that some outrage was provoked by ‘Ruby Ridge, Waco, etc’ (e.g. Timothy McVeigh)—and the increasing militarisation of police and their heavy-handedness provokes further complaint; but no rebellion (yet). We’re still waiting for that ‘shot heard round the world’. Yet keeping an overbearing federal government in check was supposed to be one of the purposes of 2A, as described by James Madison in The Federalist Papers No. 46.

    And, Sam, there’s also a ‘real nasty habit’ of Anglophobic Americans (and Anglophobes from many more nations) dumping on Brits every chance they get, on grounds often grotesquely exaggerated if not completely spurious. This particular pushback might result from USA-fanbois on this site recently patting themselves on the back for behaviours that are not only normal by First World standards but actually in decline in America.

    As for glass houses, I keep saying over and over: ALL Western Civilisation is on the way out; all Western countries are on the road to Hell, the only difference between any country is how far they are along and how fast they are travelling, but everyone is on the road to Hell.

  30. When armed resistance to government corruption is at the same zero incidents in a well armed country as it is in an essentially disarmed one, the idea that owning arms for your protection is a vital guarantee of freedom rings entirely hollow. The right simply doesn’t value principle or liberty above their own comforts, yet the left can always find those willing to go as far as needs be. Guess who wins long term.

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