Swamp Things

Yesterday I was spammed by some outfit calling itself Muslim Advocates which is “a national legal advocacy and educational organization that works on the frontlines of civil rights to guarantee freedom and justice for Americans of all faiths.” Here’s a recent tweet of theirs:

So, freedom and justice for all Americans except those who say things they disagree with. This outfit is hot under the collar over what they disingenuously insist on calling Trump’s “Muslim Ban”, which was ruled unlawful but is now before the Supreme Court. Naturally, these fair-minded race hustlers think the SCOTUS should uphold the decisions of the lower courts, and are trying to get people out protesting in Washington DC. Why they should have spammed me with an email about it I don’t know, but some of the other groups attending are worth looking at.

Justice for Muslims Collective whose mission is “to combat institutional and structural Islamophobia in the DC metro area” and which “envisions a world where Muslims around the world are treated with dignity and respect while being afforded equal access to human and civil rights.” Worthy aims indeed, but the DC metro area seems an odd place to focus their efforts.

The LGBT Bar Association whose position on the list is just above that of the Muslim Public Affairs Council.

18MillionRising.org which “brings many disparate Asian American communities together online and offline to reimagine Asian American identity with nuance, specificity, and power. We are using this Asian American identity as the foundation to build a more just and creative world where our experiences are affirmed, our leadership is valued, and all of us have the opportunity to thrive.” However, in somewhat contradictory fashion, they “do not see the Asian American identity as monolithic.”  They also “acknowledge the pervasive role capitalism has played in ripping our communities apart”, because Asian Americans are famously ill-suited to capitalistic endeavours.

National Center for Lesbian Rights, who are rightly concerned about US immigration policy regarding Somalia.

No Muslim Ban Ever campaign, whose work would have been complete if only they’d read the Wikipedia entry on Executive Order 13769.

Japanese American Citizens League whose views on Japan letting in a whopping 20 refugees in 2017 are unfortunately not stated on their website.

Oxfam America, who presumably are concerned they may have to pay the going rate for white hookers if Trump’s ban on admitting starving teenage waifs from third-world disaster zones is upheld.

National Council of Jewish Women, who sound as though they were invited by accident.

Service Employees International Union (SEIU), who racistly assume any brown-skinned person coming to America is going to work in service and thus needs representing.

South Asian Americans Leading Together (SAALT), who obviously don’t like North Asians much.

There are around 40 of these anti-Trump rabble-rousing groups, most of which will be generously funded by taxpayers. One of the surest signs that a country is staggeringly wealthy, perhaps too much so, is that these outfits not only exist but are so numerous it’s impossible to keep track of them. It’s also worth mentioning a lot of them sprung up only when Trump was elected.

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6 thoughts on “Swamp Things

  1. Pingback: Samizdata quote of the day « Samizdata

  2. So you’ve got the Muslims, the Jews, the gays and several disparate ethnic identity groups all together in the same place. That could be quite a fight. Do you suppose Vinny The Bookie is offering odds?

    “Seconds away, round one!”

    Ding! Ding!

  3. If these people really have all gathered together in one place to express their anger with America, I put it to you that four or five rounds through the window from an RPG would solve America’s problems at a stroke.

    These sort of meetings should be encouraged positively encouraged…

  4. It would be interesting to see a network map of the various characters behind all these groups. I suspect it would tie back to a very small group indeed.

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