The British police should be avoided at all costs

This is sort of a follow-up to my previous post. Over the past week, the good folk on Twitter have posted three things which ought to leave British citizens in no doubt as to the nature of the police forces which rule over them:

This state of affairs would not matter so much were real crimes not a problem in the UK. The trade-off in having oppressive laws in Singapore, and a police force willing to enforce them, is that violent crimes and crimes against property are extremely low. Now crime might be dropping overall in the UK (not that I trust the government figures), but knifings and acid attacks are a weekly occurrence in London, young girls are being groomed and raped en masse in various cities across the country, and every few months some lunatic Islamist pulls off an attack and we all light candles. Regardless of what the actual crime figures show, the perception among the public is that serious crimes are not being dealt with while the police, who are always moaning about a “lack of resources”, are engaged full-time in monitoring people’s speech and arresting anyone who utters unapproved opinions. A year ago I wrote:

[F]or policing to work a critical mass of ordinary, law-abiding people across both the middle classes and working classes must see them as being on their side against the criminals. Not necessarily on their side per se, just on their side against the criminals. It doesn’t really matter what the rich think, they can hire their own security and/or lobby government to have the police look after their interests as first priority. It is the masses that need to be kept on side.

If the police in Britain … want to remain relevant, they had better make up their minds whose side they are on and inform the law-abiding masses of their decision, preferably via demonstration rather than empty speeches.

I already think we are well on the road to many British people considering the police part of the problem, merely another branch of the criminal classes to be avoided at all costs. I keep hearing that the “rank-and-file” don’t buy into this crap and it is foisted on them by politicians and upper management, but this doesn’t explain the almost gleeful manner in which ordinary policemen and women go about enforcing these Orwellian rules. There is plenty of room for a bobby on the beat to turn a blind eye or refuse to report actions which will obviously result in a gross miscarriage of justice and perhaps that happens, but I read about far too many instances like this:

A van driver was arrested by a group of police officers after challenging them because they were parked on a double yellow line. Andy Mayfield, 53, was held in custody for 12 hours and strip searched under anti-terror laws after he started filming the cops, who were parked illegally outside their own police station in Ashton-on-Ribble, Lancashire in January. He was detained under the Terrorism Act and submitted to a rigorous questioning at the Newton Heath terrorism centre in Manchester before eventually being released.

I think it’s high time British policemen were shunned from polite society, particularly those in the higher ranks, unless they have unequivocally demonstrated whose side they are on. The default approach to a policeman should be that afforded to a bouncer at a Manchester nightclub, someone to be avoided except when absolutely necessary and even then contact kept to an absolute minimum. The day policeman cannot arrest ordinary citizens on trumped-up terror charges and expect to interact with normal society afterwards is the day they will start to change. But while the middle-classes support this stuff and engage with policemen on supposedly equal terms, rather than demand those responsible are fired on the spot, things will only get worse.

I will not ever call for policemen to be lynched by a mob. I would not ever condone policemen being lynched by a mob. But I suspect there will come a point in future where, if I see a mob lynching policemen, I will walk on by having seen nothing. If the police don’t wise up soon and change course, there is even a chance I’ll stop and watch. I doubt I’ll be alone.

Liked it? Take a second to support Tim Newman on Patreon!
Share

27 thoughts on “The British police should be avoided at all costs

  1. I should hope that van driver has a massive lawsuit coming against the uniformed thugs who (clearly wrongfully) arrested him.

    Also, anybody who films cops should ensure they are uploading directly to YouTube (or similar) so that the evidence can’t be ‘lost’

  2. Laura Southern banned for life from entering the UK

    At Briebart (all the usual caveats apply)

  3. I should hope that van driver has a massive lawsuit coming against the uniformed thugs who (clearly wrongfully) arrested him.

    They don’t care: any award doesn’t come out of their pockets, and the driver will have to go through massive upheaval to get it.

  4. This is, to a large degree, what happens when you feminise your police force.

    Or unionise it.

  5. Laura Southern banned for life from entering the UK

    If it’s true, an awful lot of people would agree with it. Like I said, the British public are going to have to learn some lessons the hard way.

  6. The last time I was in Scotland all of the banter was sectarian, I can’t imagine them talking about anything else.

  7. We should not be surprised: the gap between we, the ordinary people, and the gangs at the top is growing daily.

    The old idea, seen in WWII, was ‘we are all in this together,’ But increasingly it is plain that we aren’t *all* in anything together. The police are becoming an extension of the private arrangements made for the elite, by the elite. A cynic might say that arresting people for saying ‘naughty words’ is to ensure that both the arrest statistics are maintained and the gangs at ‘the top’ are thus protected from any criticism of their failed policies and failing governance.

    This, as Z Man says, will not end well.

  8. Read the latter part of that Met Police statement again:

    “Though what the perpetrator has done may not be against the law, their reasons for doing it are”.

    Then read the first part:

    “but the victim, or anyone else, believes it was motivated by prejudice or hate”

    The Met allow literally anyone to decide what the “reasons” were for a person’s act, and that is enough for the Met to deem it a criminal act.

    In the old dystopias at least it was the tyrant’s opinion of whether you were a criminal or not which mattered. Now the tyrant can’t be arsed and will just take anyone’s word.

  9. Anyone heard of the Culley Cup?

    1833 a demonstration by the union of the working classes demanding that the extension of the franchise didn’t go far enough.

    The police turn up and attack the demonstrators. Fighting ensues and a policeman named Robert Culley is stabbed to death.

    The ensuing enquiry/trial has the coroner suggest to the jury that the killing was lawful as the officers had not read the riot act to disperse and illegally attacked the demo.

    The jury agreed. Days later the foreman of the jury received a cup commemorating the decision, funded by a group of radical city of London businessmen who supported the just decision against the violence and illegality of the police that day.

    Long history of this

  10. ’But I suspect there will come a point in future where, if I see a mob lynching policemen, I will walk on by having seen nothing. ’

    Got a post coming up about the case where a vilolent lunatic attacking members of the public was held down by several terrified shoppers, subsequently dying. The police arrived. And arrested the shoppers.

    So I’d now just step over the guy being lynched and say ‘Sorry, mate, can’t help you in case I hurt someone.’ And go on my way.

  11. “I think it’s high time British policemen were shunned from polite society”

    Unfortunately polite society is on the same side that the police are on.

  12. On a similar note, interesting how the European Arrest Warrant, brought in as a supposedly critical aid in protecting us from terrorism, is now being used against political opponents.

    https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/03/27/deposed-catalan-minister-clara-ponsati-hand-scottish-police/

    What kind of a crime is ‘rebellion’ anyway? And is there no ‘prima facie’ case to be heard in the UK prior to handing her over? Why was such a deportation not expedited for Hamza the Hook?

    The police only enforce the laws they are given.

  13. On a similar note, interesting how the European Arrest Warrant, brought in as a supposedly critical aid in protecting us from terrorism, is now being used against political opponents.

    That’s a surprise, eh?

    The police only enforce the laws they are given.

    That’s what the police always say, but:

    1. They exercise extreme discretion in who they choose to arrest and who they ignore, meaning for much of the time they are arbiters of the law.

    2. They are forever campaigning for more powers and lobbying politicians to further deprive us of our rights.

  14. This may be relevant in some ways, from the ever fascinating Isegoria:

    Yes, the second part especially. Thanks.

  15. Having served for 13 years in the met I would say that monthly training has a lot to do with the current situation. Continually being told that we were all racist and given diversity training to rectify our wrongthink. A large section of promotion is showing what you have done to promote diversity within the police, and have you successfully dealt with a racist incident. Also being in a minority group gets you to the front of the q every time.
    All these things give you the police you have today. Some fine officers, and some not so fine. As for the leadership, they got there for either being diverse or promoting diversity.

  16. I believe it was Alan Moore who said the central theme of V for Vendetta was that “it is possible for things to get so bad that a madman with a knife becomes preferable to a policeman with a gun.”

    Here in the Deranged Dominion, I got the hell out of Toronto during a period described as “The gangs rule Toronto, and the largest, best equipped gang is the Metro Toronto Police”.

    I think it’s high time British policemen were shunned from polite society

    This is fraught with its own dangers. As our strip-searched filmer discovered, any interaction with the cops they deem insufficiently respectful can put one in for a world of harassment. There’s a growing movement in the US to make police body cams mandatory and to consider any interaction between the police and the public with the cam turned off inadmissible. It’s been amusing watching the police unions flip-flop on this; on the one hand it protects them from spurious charges, but it also means they can’t cover up for misbehaving cops any more.

  17. “but the victim, or anyone else, believes it was motivated by prejudice or hate”

    Of course except when the perpetrators are of a protected species. The family of Egyptian girl assaulted and killed in Nottingham by a bunch of black female youths were of the opinion the crime was racially motivated, but the police decreed that there was ‘no evidence’ this was the case. Had the assailants been white they would have been doing backflips to agree with the family about the terrible racist nature of the assault.

  18. “Of course except when the perpetrators are of a protected species.”

    Yes if you go back to the warning poster pictured on the OP about sectarianism in Scotland, just think of all those protected orange bastards that lord it over the top echelons of all aspects of Edinburgh society, just imagine how easy it would be for them and their lackey’s to point the bone at you, if they felt like it.

  19. Welcome to my world.

    As a 60-year-old (mostly) law-abiding white guy living in mid-USA, the greatest danger to my life lies not in disease or accident.

    It’s in my interactions with police.

    My rule, which I communicate to everyone who cares to listen, is never ever call the police unless you’re willing to see someone shot.

    It sounds as if the English police are becoming the same insular, us-against-you-all hall monitors with lethal weapons that ours have become. Good luck with that.

  20. On a related note, you have the right to remain innocent … okay, it’s the law prof who went viral for giving the first half of that talk, and some of the legal technicalities in it do not hold outside the USA, but the moral of the story does – and I’m surprised that the detective who made the second half of the talk didn’t go viral too because actually some of what he said is far more chilling, particularly for being less hypothetical!

    Time warning: it’s 45 minutes. But it’s very very good (can’t think of a TV show I’ve seen for donkeys that packs so much into the equivalent time) and is well-paced, didn’t drag for me at all.

  21. MBE – I’ll second that recommendation. I watched it a couple of years ago and haven’t been convicted of murder since

Comments are closed.