LinkedIn

Never let it be said that LinkedIn doesn’t provide an essential service in putting me in touch with like-minded professionals who can take my career to the next level:

Honestly, other than satisfying mild curiosity as to what your former colleagues are now up to, what purpose does LinkedIn serve?

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25 thoughts on “LinkedIn

  1. Headhunters use it as a tool to find job candidates. I’d almost go as far as saying it is their primary tool; at least for the second tier guys.

    Also good if you want to get depressed by how much better your former colleagues are doing than you are.

  2. Headhunters use it as a tool to find job candidates. I’d almost go as far as saying it is their primary tool; at least for the second tier guys.

    My experience with headhunters has been little better than with recruiters. One of the most satisfying aspects of the oil crash has been that they no longer call me.

  3. Very useful when working in the public sector for keeping an eye on the new non-job posts created in your area and who fills them. There is a certain type of parasite who hops from one public sector post to another often taking their underlings with them. Having advance warning of their arrival and discovering what they have done (read f**ked up) in their previous post can be handy knowledge.

  4. It’s a good tool for finding out how dishonest, desperate, and illiterate one’s colleagues and ex-colleagues actually are.

  5. I just get consultant types trying to sell me expat financial advice… God only knows how they got my Indian mobile number – I dont even know it myself. But they found me on linkedin…

    The only useful linkedin connection i’ve ever had was when the local hire car manager tried to connect to me whilst sorting out transportation (as policy states im not allowed to drive in India, nor would i want to), so I actually was able to bypass the usual Chinese whispers chain that goes on in virtually all Indian transactions (at least 10 people get involved in everything so the end node never recieves the initiators proposal as written.)

    Gave him a ring. Cross checked requirements (or rather I told him to rip up his set and gave him the correct ones), and for the first time ever, the correct car shows up where and when it is supposed to. Result!

    But coming back to Linkedin’s usefulness: 1 solitary example in 10 years.

  6. LinkedIn: for years I mentally pronounced it as LINKY-DLIN as I’d no idea what the hell it was. Some German crappo, I assumed.

    Why oh why do we use stupid typefaces where capital I (eye) looks identical to lower case l (ell)?

  7. I’m trying to get to 1,000 contacts. I don’t know why; it’s like one of those stupid iphone games…

  8. How times change. Back in the day I had a business class flight from NY to Switzerland plus hotel all paid, for a job interview. Twice actually, as we couldn’t agree terms; they hired someone else then interviewed me again and still couldn’t.

    My last round with head hunters was that I was expected to present myself in Barcelona from Santiago, no expenses paid.

    I still get silly requests on LinkedIn plus job offers in telemarketing. Good job I’m retired.

  9. I find it VERY useful to keep track of contacts in companies that move on to other companies, often in the same area of responsibility.

    Easy entry into new company either directly or because they point me in the right direction! 🙂 For me it is a useful sales tool and of my hundreds (cough, cough) of contacts at least 60% are of genuine interest to me.

    I am not looking for a job, so the other way round is of no interest.

    I generally spot the no-hopers à la Tim above and scammers (although sometimes they are hellish cunning) and rarely accept somebody who two days later directly tries to flog me summat.

  10. Perry de Havilland
    “My LinkedIn will inform you that I am the director of the Psychotic Hippopotamus Games Group”

    I always thought that’s what you actually were….

  11. “How times change. Back in the day I had a business class flight from NY to Switzerland plus hotel all paid, for a job interview.”

    For those of us that don’t bother with LinkedIn and the like things haven’t changed that much. Transfer fees and golden parachutes are still on offer to get you to the table although they are negotiated directly with the organisation without the need for headhunters or any other type of middle men adding value.

  12. I used LinkedIn for the same reason David Moore does, more or less. It also helps me keep occasional contact with ex colleagues.

    I get many, many invitations to connect from Indian patent search companies (which seem to be mostly “John” in his bedroom with a PatSnap account) – the same types actually cold-call us at work on a fairly regular basis. When I get them to admit that they can’t work in French they normally go away permanently, so it’s worth the time input talking to them for 5 minutes.

  13. I used LinkedIn for the same reason David Moore does, more or less. It also helps me keep occasional contact with ex colleagues.

    Yes, me too. I met some good people in various companies, and it’s a handy way of seeing where they are just in case we’re ever in the same place again. Otherwise, it’s pretty useless IMO.

  14. My LinkedIn will inform you that I am the director of the Psychotic Hippopotamus Games Group

    😀

  15. Sometimes there is even a useful article

    Yes, that’s a good one! Spot on about the lack of reporting in a “zero incident” culture.

    But most of the articles are absolutely God-awful. I remember the Oilfield Expat taking one apart here.

  16. My last round with head hunters was that I was expected to present myself in Barcelona from Santiago, no expenses paid.

    I used to have a post up on here called How Not to Headhunt. I took it down when my employment status went a bit wobbly, but I’m thinking I might put it back up.

  17. Most linkedin articles are such corporate BS.

    Occasionally there’s a gem among them, but most are complete BS. BTW I find the uniformity of corporate BS is a good example of how powerful groupthink can be in creating spontaneous “order” without there ever needing to be some kind of conspiracy to organise it actively.

  18. BTW I find the uniformity of corporate BS is a good example of how powerful groupthink can be in creating spontaneous “order” without there ever needing to be some kind of conspiracy to organise it actively.

    Yes, and I spend a lot of time thinking about this and observing it in the wild.

  19. When I did a stint as a contractor it was useful for people to (a) find me and check (b) who I know. let me explain the latter. Since I work in an IT field which is pretty specialist, it meant that my prospective employer might look at me and see that I know X & Y. They also know X & Y and that’s enough to get me to stage 2. A lot of the work I do never gets advertised unless they fail several times with the agencies.

    Now I understand the irritation you mention concerning recruitment/headhunters. They get an enquiry for someone who knows say Business Objects. Business Objects was bought by SAP and so the headhunter sends SPAM to everyone who has SAP on their CV. 99% of those targeted are absolutely irrelevant. It’s like the employee wants someone who’s good at MS Access and the mailshot goes to everyone with Office. It’s so timewasting and SPAM is the right word.

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