Unrealistic Job Advert #3

This one was emailed to my wife:

We are looking for translators to translate Russia city names from English to Russian (Cyrillic alphabet). For the person who wins the project, we need a guarantee that you can complete this within 5 weeks but the earlier the better. Further, you should guarantee your work to be error free for up to 1 year. When our customers find translation errors, you agree to fix it within 10 days or less.

There are 190,418 cities in Russia that need translation.

The bid will be won based on cost and experience (the lowest bidder with the most experience wins the project so give us your best price). Please give us a project price, not a per city cost. We are looking for someone who can get started right away. Tell us about your translation experience.

Hmmm. 

5 weeks maximum.  190,418 cities. Assume a 60 hour working week, excluding breaks.  That gives us 300 hours to complete all 190,418 translations, which equates to one every 5.7 seconds.

Dream on.  They need a computer programmer, not a translator.

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3 Responses to Unrealistic Job Advert #3

  1. NICK says:

    The other odd thing… why would they need to translate Russian city names from English into Russian. Russian cities are already in Russian and written in cyrillic.

  2. Tim Newman says:

    I suspect, with no evidence whatsoever, they are doing something like ripping off some GPS software or the like. A list of Russian cities shouldn’t be that hard to come by, unless they are clueless. Which judging by the advert, they might be.

  3. Andy says:

    They could always get a team of people to do the work, which gives more than 5.7 seconds per city.

    I suppose the problem with a computerised solution is that it’d have to be based on transliteration, which when the city name has gone from Cyrillic to Latin to Cyrillic again, is going to result in some seriously mangled city names.

    I agree though – it sounds like they’ve got data in Latin linked to GPS co-ordinates, and so it’s quickest to change the city names, rather than do all the GPS again.

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