The Inertia of the British Middle Classes

The fascinating social experiment which is the United Kingdom got a bit more interesting last week when a bomb was planted on the London Underground. Fortunately it failed to fully explode, but it burned a number of people as the carriage passed through Parsons Green tube station, leaving behind a smoking Lidl carrier bag with fairy lights and crocodile clips which people seemingly walked right up to and photographed. Obviously they didn’t know it was a bomb, which leaves me to assume they were merely outraged at carrier bags littering the tube, bags they thought had been banned.

The media are, as usual, doing everything they can to obfuscate over who planted the bomb. Check out this BBC report:

An 18-year-old and 21-year-old are being held over the explosion, which injured 30 at Parsons Green station.

The house being searched in Sunbury-on-Thames belongs to a married couple known for fostering hundreds of children, including refugees.

Friend Alison Griffiths said the couple had an 18-year-old and a 22-year-old staying with them recently.

She described Mr and Mrs Jones as “great pillars of the community”, adding: “They do a job that not many people do.”

Lots of people have 18 and 21/22 year olds staying with them. What we want to know is are these the same ones who planted the bomb? The BBC can’t quite bring itself to ask the question, let alone answer it.

When the British government decided to admit thousands of child refugees from Iraq, Syria, and everywhere else it was obvious that many were not refugees and an awful lot of them weren’t children. The authorities didn’t even bother hiding this, such is their contempt for truth and transparency. They were warned time and again that these people weren’t being properly vetted and, having come from a war zone, some of them could be Islamist nutters bent on waging jihad once in the UK. Nobody cared: not the government, and nor the population.

Sure, people made noises on social media but when Nigel Farage brought up the issue of refugees in the last General Election the middle classes howled in outrage and backed that nice man Corbyn instead. However you interpret the results of the GE, one thing is clear: the bulk of the British people seem quite unconcerned about refugees and mass immigration. Proof of this is the reaction of the media and middle classes to people on the continent like Geert Wilders and Marine Le Pen. They wrung their hands at these nasty, racist people and cheered when the Netherlands and France “rejected hate” by electing nice, reasonable people who avoided mentioning Islam, terrorism, and immigration as much as they could.

The British middle classes have gone into full-on meltdown over Donald Trump, with many wanting him banned from the UK and others openly calling him a white supremacist. The same people reacted with apoplectic outrage when the rather mild and reasonable Jacob Rees-Mogg said that, being a Catholic, he opposed abortion in all forms. Apparently there is no place for opinions like that in British political discourse, and he was branded a dangerous extremist. The chances of someone like Rees-Mogg, i.e. a genuine conservative being elected British Prime Minister are slim indeed.

What people want is the sort of wet centrist that Cameron personified. Looks like a nice young man, not especially bright, will say whatever makes people happy and won’t really try to change anything. He’s basically the nice-but-dim uncle your parents let run the kids’ birthday party, a safe pair of hands. They don’t want the other uncle who goes on anti-nuclear marches and everyone suspects is a bit of paedo, and nor do they want the one who’s been in the marines and swears too much. People don’t like Theresa May because she exudes soulless mediocrity and reminds people of the dinner lady nobody liked in school, not because her policies are stupid.

This smouldering bucket on the tube has proved that beyond doubt. The policy of admitting in unvetted migrants from the Middle East and passing them off as child refugees was central to the government of which Theresa May and Amber Rudd were part. Okay, perhaps the 18-year old was a child when he got admitted. It would certainly explain the amateurish bomb-making efforts. The instructions on Fisher Price detonators were always hard to follow. I digress.

My point is that anyone who had not been following politics for the past few years would think the British public would be going absolutely mental at this government and the last for pursuing this insane policy, which has bitten them on the arse in the very manner everyone said it would. But no, the media and middle classes are as muted as ever in the wake of an Islamist bombing, hands are being wrung about a possible Islamaphobic backlash, Sadiq Khan has requested the BBC play the same speech he did last time to save him the effort of repeating himself, and all focus is on how Boris Johnson isn’t fit to be Foreign Minister because he said some things Remainers don’t like.

One can only conclude from all this that the majority British public, and certainly the middle classes, are not unhappy with the situation. Economists have this wonderful term called revealed preferences whereby you watch what people actually do rather than listen to what they say. Well, I’ve seen the reaction of the British public to Wilders, Le Pen, Rees-Mogg, Trump, and Farage and I’ve also seen their response to a series of Islamist bombings aimed at killing as many Britons as possible. What conclusion am I supposed to draw?

My guess is most people live nice, comfortable lives. They have enough food, a warm dry bed, a roof over their heads and more luxuries than their parents ever had, including a second car, foreign holidays, and an expensive phone. By historical standards they are financially secure (nobody is going to evict them from their home, and they can always get another credit card), and most are raising one, two, or three absolute brats who give the mother that unconditional love she’s craved since her student days when she watched far too much telly. It’s not just material, they have spiritual satisfaction, too: in the absence of a religion they have taken to virtue-signalling, backing righteous causes such as banning carrier bags, and making the world a better place – by opposing nasty men like Donald Trump, for example.

One should never discount how much intertia resides in a population so satisfied. Let’s be honest, nobody wants to change anything very much while things are going so well. If a giant bomb went off in London next week killing dozens of people and a fringe politician came out of the woodwork and said “By fuck, enough’s enough, I’m gonna solve this!” the middle classes would shit themselves and would cheer the Met as they arrested him for hate speech and carted him away in a paddy wagon decorated with LGBT livery. The chances of any individual being blown up or mown down by an Islamist nutter in the UK are miniscule, and for most people it’s simply not worth rocking the boat by electing someone who’s willing to harbour robust opinions, never mind actually do something.

In other words, Islamic terrorism is an acceptable price to pay to avoid upsetting the material and spiritual status quo the middle classes enjoy. And that’s why nothing gets done about it.

Anyone want to come up with a better explanation?

(Incidentally, this isn’t just a British thing: the German election is about to see Angela Merkel rewarded for her insane immigration and refugee policies with another term, running against someone who makes her look sensible. Again, what conclusion am I supposed to draw?)

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60 thoughts on “The Inertia of the British Middle Classes

  1. What I found particularly perverse in the last year or so is the public reaction to the spate of terror attacks vs Grenfell fire. Each and every terror attack this year (and back as far as the Bataclan attacks in late 2015) seems to be treated as one would a natural disaster – something that just happens, like a force of nature – like Tsunamis or Hurricanes or a tragic accident. Its candle lit vigils and tribute concerts and reeling off the names of victims and their personal histories.

    Whereas the Grenfell fire, which was very much a tragic accident, was treated with level of anger that was appropriate for a premeditated attack on innocent civilians. For sure the usual hand-wringers got in there first – shameful cartoon in the Guardian while the embers were still smouldering of the tower with the conservative oak tree logo on top. Some of this changed with time, but the initial response was one of fury and blame.

    I note that these are the public pieties for both types of incident – what people will say in private I suspect is very different. But I do wonder what this tells us about ourselves as a culture.

    I write this as a Christian, as someone who I feel is compelled to try and forgive by my faith. Nevertheless it feels that the forgiveness that is proffered to terrorists at the moment is nothing of the sort – it is deliberate & wilful forgetfulness – I wonder what it would take for that to change and I fear for when it does.

  2. Perhaps we get the politicians we deserve?

    The Overton Window is very narrow in the west at the moment. The ranges of policy options offered by the major political parties in economic, defence, immigration, etc. look very similar regardless of political colour.

  3. What I found particularly perverse in the last year or so is the public reaction to the spate of terror attacks vs Grenfell fire.

    Yup, that was another very illuminating comparison.

  4. Put succinctly, it’s cos we’ve solved all the big problems.

    Yes, exactly. Maslow had something to say about this.

  5. The obvious implication / conclusion to draw is that at some level of pain the middle classes would respond differently. If Islamism really got going then so might they.

  6. I think you’re generally right.

    One thing not to be missed is how much there is a feeling of anti-immigration, but it’s more muted because people fear being labelled racists. Just because you don’t hear it doesn’t mean it isn’t out there.

    One reason I’m in favour of electoral reform is that it allows for more choices. FPTP encourages people to vote May just because they don’t want Corbyn. But they’d perhaps prefer a more robust, anti-immigration Conservative.

    The other thing is that while it stays in London or Manchester, it won’t have much effect. These places are stuffed full of footsoldiers of the state who are never going to vote Conservative or UKIP. Not only government employees, but people in law, fake charities or institutions like the BBC who depend on government not opening them up to competition. If you’re one of the productive class of people in this country living in marginal places like Peterborough or Plymouth, the odds of you being close to, or even disrupted by a bomb in London are about nil.

  7. The obvious implication / conclusion to draw is that at some level of pain the middle classes would respond differently.

    Yes. I am mildly interested to see what it would take.

  8. Just because you don’t hear it doesn’t mean it isn’t out there.

    True, but if JRM or some other proper Tory ran for office I bet he’d not get anywhere near. They considered David Davies too right wing, FFS.

    The other thing is that while it stays in London or Manchester, it won’t have much effect.

    Yup.

  9. Tim I think the middle class in the USA is notably further into the zone than we are in the UK. If a shitstorm is going to get unleashed on those who sponsor and fund Islamic terror then it’s far more likely to come from the USA than anywhere else. We’d be whingeing from the sidelines (BBC) whilst simultaneously egging it on (Daily Mail).

    Also of interest and relevance is the largely unreported but nonetheless prevalent issue of middle class lefties in the USA ‘taking the red pill’ (losing the wool over their eyes) – as the antics of eg Antifa reveal truths they chose to ignore about the inherent nature of the left.

  10. Currently there is no target – the Middle classes aren’t suddenly going to turn into a pitchfork mob going about torching their nearest mosque because of each incident unless we suddenly ended up with Balkan style fractures in the community – I simple can’t see that happening en-masse in the UK.

    To reflect what you’re saying here, the group that really needs to respond and reach their tipping point is the more integrated, moderate (middle class) Muslim community themselves but at a greater level than is currently happening.
    I would hope & expect that levels of shame and anguish about what’s being done in the name of their religion are pretty high amongst that group. Sadiq Khan and Baronness Warsi etc. are on the same Venn Diagram as the rest of the Middle classes that you describe above. It will be interesting to see if Nazir Afzal takes things forwards in this direction though, in what shape or form I don’t really know… Maybe we really are just boiling frogs.

  11. To reflect what you’re saying here, the group that really needs to respond and reach their tipping point is the more integrated, moderate (middle class) Muslim community themselves but at a greater level than is currently happening.

    Why would moderate Muslims tip over and do something about it when non-Muslims are falling over themselves to make excuses and ignore the problem? The moderate Muslims will only see it as a problem when the non-Muslims start holding their feet to the fire.

    Sadiq Khan and Baronness Warsi etc. are on the same Venn Diagram as the rest of the Middle classes that you describe above.

    I wish that were true. Personally, I don’t know whose side they’re on but it’s not mine.

  12. Tim I think the middle class in the USA is notably further into the zone than we are in the UK.

    Yeah, Trump’s election showed they are at least prepared to vote for the guy who talks about the problems.

  13. people in the West are very tolerant, until they aren’t, and then they’re very brutal.

    Yes, I’ve written on this before.

  14. The minority sets the narrative, and this minority owns the MSM and the schools and academia. The rest of the people are mainly sheeple – they absorb the current narrative and support it without thinking too deeply (eg they voted for May in her constituency instead of the UKIP candidate, and another example – they never put Farage in parliament). The same people 100 years ago would have rejoiced in the Empire. Now they join together in slagging off their own history, and rubbishing themselves and their country and people. They are just absorbing what those who control the narrative tell them is the current culture. They will go on doing this in their selfish and unthinking way, until they are no longer rich and pampered and safe. Then when that time arrives, they will think differently, and a new culture will appeal to them instead – one based on self-interest rather than on the current one of self-hate.

    The switch can come suddenly and dramatically, as the new culture (self-interest) will appeal more to their inner natures than the current one provided by the left and which is one of self-hate. It is hard to sell self-hate – but congratulations to the left in persuading the people to do this so far. But the left know that persuading the people to do this is like twisting a balloon out of shape. Self-hatred is the twisted balloon and it is not in tune with the inner instincts. One day the balloon will revert to its natural shape and the self-hate will end. But the people will have to suffer hardship first.

  15. “Sadiq Khan and Baronness Warsi etc. are on the same Venn Diagram as the rest of the Middle classes that you describe above.

    I wish that were true. Personally, I don’t know whose side they’re on but it’s not mine.”

    No, but how would an advertising/ marketing wonk classify them? You’d probably be in the same banding. I’m not sure if Baroness W would get Amazon pop ups for banjo strings and velcro gloves buthope you catch my drift?

  16. I’m not sure if Baroness W would get Amazon pop ups for banjo strings and velcro gloves buthope you catch my drift?

    Heh!

  17. It was good to see that the streets of London were recently taken back by white men once again. It just goes to show how a relative few good well behaved men can quickly rise and confront the state, particularly when they have been given a raw deal, they may have been from Cologne but they were of good stock.

  18. It just goes to show how a relative few good well behaved men can quickly rise and confront the state, particularly when they have been given a raw deal, they may have been from Cologne but they were of good stock.

    Funny you should mention that, I wondered when I saw it where these men were on New Year’s Eve a couple of years back. My guess is the kind of men from Cologne who go to Arsenal and wreck the place for fun are of a very different class than the women getting groped in the city centre, and hence quite separate.

  19. Tim Newman,

    “True, but if JRM or some other proper Tory ran for office I bet he’d not get anywhere near. They considered David Davies too right wing, FFS.”

    The Conservative Party considered that David Davies wasn’t a winner, and almost entirely on the basis of presentation and a rather limited bit of audience research conducted by the BBC.

    The result of the push against “the nasty party” (translation: anti-PC, pro-responsibility) has yielded little success. A coalition was the result of the Conservatives standing against a personality-free-zone of a Prime Minister that presided over an economic crash. This was then replaced by a slight marginal improvement over a weird nerd, and then slid back to coalition facing a communist.

    OK, 3 election wins, but almost anyone could have won those elections when facing the opposition they did.

    What the Conservatives at the top lack is any sense of appealing to people who aren’t fans of big government. Cameron was writing for The Guardian, FFS. They pretty much apologise when they cut, rather than seeing it as a positive thing of giving power back to the people. And frankly, most of the local party activists won’t rebel.

    The only hope for the Conservatives are the membership, who will not elect someone like Cameron again. Me, I’m already working on creating a new party with some local people to stand against the Conservative. He can either move to the “right” or we’ll wreck his majority and put Labour in. The only person who’s made a damn bit of difference in 15 years is Nigel Farage by doing the same thing.

  20. Over the last few months three different people have posted something on my Facebook feed along the lines of “we needn’t worry about terrorism because far more people die in car accidents each day”. They are the kind of otherwise highly intelligent people that would pull that statement apart if it was posted in relation to anything else. I actually find it quite offensive, in the old fashioned sense of the word.

    I might have said this before but I think that it’s difficult to respond to social media posts like that in case it ends up in a public argument in front of everyone you know with a bunch of people you have never met. Even a polite challenge or question would get you labelled a dreadful racist illiberal bigot within seconds, rather than someone who is generally supportive of immigration but doesn’t think that people being injured or killed practically monthly is an acceptable price to pay for unchecked immigration, or that being injured or dying in a car accident is not the same as being injured or dying at the hands of someone who is actively trying to kill you as you try and go about your day. So you end up in a kind of social media positive (negative?) feedback loop where certain opinions are circulated amplified because it’s too difficult to even try and check them.

  21. One shouldn’t necessarily confuse the views of middle class journalists, politicians and Twitterers with the ‘middle class’ generally.

    Having said that, the middle class have always been useless, except when it comes to radical revolution: it wasn’t the working class who drove the French, Russian or Chinese revolutions.

    No, when push comes to shove, the only ones you can rely on are the working and upper classes, who, not coincidentally, can’t stand the middle class.

  22. “My guess is the kind of men from Cologne who go to Arsenal and wreck the place for fun are of a very different class than the women getting groped in the city centre”

    Different class alright.

    Remember the infamous Akran the Tiger of Red Star Ultra football hooligan fame, he may have been the ring leader at the football match at Maksimir Stadium that started the Serbian war and a convicted criminal but he was never done for rape.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SmRtxAJCUNM

  23. One shouldn’t necessarily confuse the views of middle class journalists, politicians and Twitterers with the ‘middle class’ generally.

    Look who they keep electing, FFS! I’d love to think the middle classes were a reliable force just itching for the chance to show they think in a wildly different manner from the chattering classes of politicians, journalists, and Twitterers…but who am I kidding?

    it wasn’t the working class who drove the French, Russian or Chinese revolutions.

    Something often forgotten but worth remembering.

  24. Remember the infamous Akran the Tiger

    I do. Siniša Mihajlović was a fan of his, and you can read about him here.

    What amused me about Arkan was he was always described as a warlord and you’d conjure up a picture of him in combat fatigues. Then he’d turn up on TV in an Armani suit.

  25. Over the last few months three different people have posted something on my Facebook feed along the lines of “we needn’t worry about terrorism because far more people die in car accidents each day”.

    Ah yes, that argument. Which rather ignores the fact that driving a car his extremely useful and the risk of dying while doing so worth taking to get that benefit. Whereas nobody is sure what the benefit is to taking the risk of being blown up by a lunatic.

    I might have said this before but I think that it’s difficult to respond to social media posts like that in case it ends up in a public argument in front of everyone you know with a bunch of people you have never met.

    Yeah, hence my rant about Facebook politics a couple of months back. I’m gonna turn that into a post on here, I think.

  26. So I think there are a few things going on here. As has been mentioned, righteous anger is possible, indeed rewarded, over the causes and scapegoats for Grenfell. This is obviously not the case with respect to the cause of 99.9% of acts of terrorism.

    In addition, in this case, it is very easy to find a specific and correct cause about which most people will agree. In principle, had A not been done, but B was done instead, we know that Grenfell would not have happened.

    This however, is not so easily done with respect to acts of terrorism. Whilst most (not all!) people will acknowledge that the rantings of the prophet had something to do with it, there is usually something else going on – the mental health of the terrorist for example. Basically; it is more complicated than Grenfell.

    The car accident/terrorism parallel is much misinterpreted (possibly also misused). It is correct to state that, as a society, we need to accept certain costs, in order to remain prosperous and free. What actions we take should not however be informed by whether the harm was accidental or intentional. I have also heard the argument that since car travel is beneficial it is worth paying the cost of the occasional accident, whereas no such thing is true of terrorism. I don’t accept that. All that we need to know is the costs of the harm and of preventing or mitigating a harm. Then we decide.

    There are other reasons for why we should treat car accidents/terrorism differently, so I don’t accept you can leave it at that and wave it away. Civilisation is pretty thin, even here, and it is dangerous to adopt a permissive attitude to actions that hack away at it, either directly or by provoking a counter action.

    The solution to terrorism is to either introduce a Mayist police state or to restrict the freedom of those who cause terrorism, up to and including expulsion. I much prefer the latter myself.

  27. @Tim – “I do. Siniša Mihajlović was a fan of his, and you can read about him here.”

    Wow, what a man, a true patriot and saved by a phone call by other patriots, thanks for bringing this to my attention. These are the type of leaders that we need and sadly lack.

    I don’t think a football game could be the spark that ignites the English uprising, I also think Joe Strummer lyrics in White Riot have been shown to be prescient judging by the apathetic state of affairs in London town.

    In The Great Wave: Price Revolutions and the Rhythym of History David Hackett documents amongst other things the end of each society since the Middle Ages. He talks a lot about the important distinction between hungry people, who are a danger and a threat to the state, to the emaciated that are too weak to pick up a stick in anger. I don’t think we will see this level of hunger in England and lets face it obese people do not revolt.

    So what is it, what will be the catalyst for change that motivates the freemen of England to rise, sadly, I just can’t see anything coming which is not a good sign for any of us.

    And Tim don’t think that you will be okay in your Safe European Home either.

    “Each revolution is marked by continuing inflation, a widening gap between rich and poor, increasing instability, and finally a crisis at the crest of the wave that is characterized by demographic contraction, social and political upheaval, and economic collapse. The most violent of these climaxes was the catastrophic fourteenth century, in which war, famine, and the Black Death devastated the continent – the only time in Europe’s history that the population actually declined.”

  28. The solution to terrorism is to either introduce a Mayist police state or to restrict the freedom of those who cause terrorism, up to and including expulsion. I much prefer the latter myself.

    When the acts of terror were being caused by blokes with British passports and English accents, the disaffected sons of first or second generation immigrants, I could understand people’s reluctance to start imposing restrictions. But in the case of the last ones – the Manchester bombing and this smouldering bucket – they have been carried out by people deliberately admitted to the country from war zones where jihadism is rife as a matter of government policy, without any vetting, despite all the warnings against doing so. It is criminally negligent on the part of the Home Office (who are oh so careful to ensure middle-class Australians or Canadians jump through all sorts of hoops to settle here), yet people are more outraged by Trump’s tweets.

  29. And Tim don’t think that you will be okay in your Safe European Home either.

    I don’t think I am, but being without a family I can move fast, and I have friends in Russia. 😉 😛

  30. Wow, what a man, a true patriot

    He particularly looked the part when he suffered a fractured cheek and had to wear a mask:

  31. “In other words, Islamic terrorism is an acceptable price to pay to avoid upsetting the material and spiritual status quo the middle classes enjoy. And that’s why nothing gets done about it.”

    For the last 18 months or so, I’ve started saying (whenever the latest atrocity that has happened – here, or in France, or wherever – crops up in conversation) after the standard tut-tutting, “Well… I think it’s a price worth paying…”, and just watching how most people wrestle with how to respond to that – not knowing whether to agree or disagree. I usually drop it in, watch them for a few seconds trying to respond and wander off.

  32. @Patrick: “The obvious implication / conclusion to draw is that at some level of pain the middle classes would respond differently. If Islamism really got going then so might they.”

    Another thing I drop in regularly after the standard tut-tutting is “Well, you should get used to it, cos there’s going to be more of it, bigger and more often, until…”. People tend to nod in agreement, then a cloud of doubt / confusion passes over their face and many then ask “Until what?”. To which my response is (somewhat gnomically, I guess), “Exactly…” and leave it with them.

    I’d like to think that this has some effect on people’s thinking! Perhaps not though.

  33. I usually drop it in, watch them for a few seconds trying to respond and wander off.

    I do that as well! I say things like “Well, clearly most people are okay with this or they’d do something about it.”

    I also like to say Sadiq Khan was spot on when he said terrorism is part and parcel of living in a modern city. It is, with this lot in charge.

  34. “I also like to say Sadiq Khan was spot on when he said terrorism is part and parcel of living in a modern city. It is, with this lot in charge.”

    Don’t hear them saying that about gun violence do we? Or for that matter, offence to verbal statements. Both of which have been criminalised, in the former case ineffectively.

    Whilst I tend to view these as very grown up things to say (I think Obama even once said that the US can ‘absorb’ a nuclear attack – which is true), as night follows day they then clamp down on whatever minor thing is the ‘unacceptable’ of the day, thereby voiding whatever claim they might have had to rational thinking.

  35. @Patrick – indeed it does. However I would wager ‘they’ *have* thought about it but have come to the conclusion that they won’t do anything for the reasons Tim has outlined here – inertia. The outcome in the for now would be electorally unpalatable. Things are going to get worse – A LOT worse – before they get better. I keep pointing this out to the less (economically) mobile young parents I know. To give them something to think about.

  36. The middle class muslims, Sadiq Khan, Warsi and the like, will eventually pick a side, but probably not until Baghdad comes to England. Then it will be which side of the Sunni/Shia/Kurd/etc divide they inhabit.

    You may have missed it but 83 people were killed in two separate attacks at a Shia pilgrimage in Southern Iraq last week. The sort of ‘political infighting’ that goes on regularly in the Muslim world.

    When that sort of theological dispute is a regular Friday morning occurrence in our cities and towns we will be sure we have achieved true multiculturalism.

  37. @Lockers “Things are going to get worse – A LOT worse – before they get better.”

    It is the state that it is the problem, it is the root cause of ever single thing that is going wrong in the UK, playing around with different forms of state, this kind of Tory that kind of Lefty, is only playing into their Hegelian trap and forever grabbing and murderous hands. The state is your enemy and it will never protect you, quite the opposite, as you can see by the current state of affairs.

    Kill the state and all of the other problems will stop dead in their track.

  38. @Bardon – 100% with you there. People look totally baffled when I say the state should be minimal – really minimal. They really do think a large, overweening state is the natural way of things. The ongoing long march through the institutions has ensured / is ensuring this way of thinking. And is probably helping bolster this inertia Tim is talking about here. It all kind of feeds on itself.

    [edit] Actually I just read that back and I hope I don’t sound a bit tin-foil hat there! But I do believe the West is eating itself when there are barbarians at the door (indeed, are already through it!)

  39. No tin foil hat in my books, only a Statist and his checka would accuse you of that and yes the long march is well on in the UK. 1984 happened.

  40. Just a few thoughts:

    Merkel is not going to be rewarded for 2015 – it is going to cost her votes. The reason she will still head the largest party is that it is pretty much the only serious mistake she has made in 12 years. German voters are seeing this in context.

    The FDP will be back in parliament and potentially the third biggest party. A (properly) liberal party with a migration policy that is not far from the AfD. Not a lot of people know that.

    British politics is likewise currently dominated by other, more pressing issues. Refugees, fake or genuine, criminal or law-abiding, simply aren’t an issue, especially as the UK has been extremely effective at keeping them out.

  41. I remember the footage taken in one of the bars attcked at London Bridge, where someone shouts “fucking muslim cunts” and his mate replies”fucking shut up, bruv, they ain’t muslims” as they cower on the floor. I think it’s fair to expect people to slowly recover their senses over time, but can there ever be a reasonable solution?

  42. The reason she will still head the largest party is that it is pretty much the only serious mistake she has made in 12 years.

    At least, the only one visible to the voters. Time will tell is she’s made others.

    Refugees, fake or genuine, criminal or law-abiding, simply aren’t an issue, especially as the UK has been extremely effective at keeping them out.

    If it was that effective they’d not have refugees planting bombs on the tube.

  43. I quite like a quote by Stefan Molyneux on this; people in the West are very tolerant, until they aren’t, and then they’re very brutal.

    That might have been true once, but people/s change, and a response to the outrages we’ve suffered is now so overdue that I fear it will never come and our lamp-posts will remain sadly unadorned.

    It probably needs only a small minority of highly engaged and committed people to wreak havoc – and perhaps even take effective control of a weak state, especially when key members of the establishment decline to resist, if not actively collude. The SocJus/CultMarx/Islamophile coalition could already outnumber the non-apathetic part of the population.

  44. @Trevor- “It probably needs only a small minority of highly engaged and committed people to wreak havoc – and perhaps even take effective control of a weak state”

    Yes it is very possible that such a group could organise, move rapidly and effectively and enable a transition of power back to the people, throw out the statues and reestablish common law.

    The first thing they should do is draw up a list of persona non-grata, such a list must be restricted to the upper echelons of the state and it’s high value political, judicial, military, intelligence, police, religious, aristocratic, banking, academic and media traitors such that they could all be rounded up in the very early hours of the morning preventing them from communicating with each other and taking evasive action. Once arrested by the militia they would be taken for interview and risk classification and immediately classified as either high or very high risk. The high risk would be spared and transported to the Isle of Jura for the rest of their natural life.

    This would not be televised other than the announcement that it has taken place which would be simultaneously broadcast across breakfast TV to the awakening now freemen and women of Britain.

    “Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.”

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