Nurses’ Salaries

From a Twitter thread about underpaid nurses being forced to use food banks:

Indeed, I’d not be complaining if I could put away 9.3% of my gross salary towards a pension and not miss it either. But it puts nurses’ salaries versus those of the private sector into perspective, doesn’t it?

Share

5 thoughts on “Nurses’ Salaries

  1. And that’s less than a quarter of the cost of that pension! When I went self employed I worked out what I would have to save at conservative investment rates to replace the final salary scheme I was leaving. About 40% of salary. Could afford 35% so that’s what I did. Agree with the “Deduct it at source and you don’t miss it sentiment though.

  2. In Australia the employer has to contribute 9.5% of the employee’s base salary to their nominated pension scheme, which is called superannuation and also has lower tax rates.

  3. As a (now retired) Police officer, I was required to pay 11.5% of my salary towards my pension – 3 times what local authority workers paid and 11.5 times what central politicians pay (now 13.5% thanks to David Cameron and Theresa May). Like nurses, Police officers were on a national pay scale so those who lived and worked in the cheaper parts of the country found that they had more disposable income than those in London and he South East, especially when it came to affording mortgages or rent. It’s not a case of being able to ‘afford’ a little over 9% towards a pension, it’s more a case of having no choice apart from opting out, if that is permissible.

  4. Didn’t nurses and police officers get extra money or help with a mortgage because they were “key workers”?

  5. And that’s less than a quarter of the cost of that pension! When I went self employed I worked out what I would have to save at conservative investment rates to replace the final salary scheme I was leaving. About 40% of salary.

    Yes, I think that’s what a lot of the public sector employees on Defined Benefits pensions don’t realise:

    1) How big a pot you’d need to have to provide a pension of that amount; and
    2) How much saving it would take to get there. With today’s interest rates and stock market performance, it would be way over half your salary.

Comments are closed.