Aix-les-Bains and Lac du Bourget

I’m back from Annecy, where I had a splendid few days cooking a Christmas dinner of roast chicken and Yorkshire pudding and taking in some local sights.

One such place was Aix-les-Bains, which I’d never visited before.  Like Annecy it sits beside a lake – Lac du Bourget – which is the largest in France, and I have heard there is some sort of local rivalry between the two towns.  Having now visited both it is clear that Annecy is the more picturesque and attracts more tourists, but the lake at Aix is nonetheless beautiful and it seems more suitable for sailing than Lake Annecy judging by the number of sailboats and small harbours dotted about.  I also found that there are several viewpoints offering spectacular views of Lac du Bourget which can be accessed by road, whereas the best views of Lake Annecy are mostly obtained by hiking on foot to the top of a mountain.  Unfortunately I didn’t have my SLR with me and so was only able to take photos with my iPhone, but I’m sure I’ll go back there before too long with a proper camera.

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11 thoughts on “Aix-les-Bains and Lac du Bourget

  1. Glad to see you back, nice photos and pleased to see you enjoyed Yorkshire puddings as part of your break.

    As a true Yorkshireman, I trust these were square. You see, all southern softies think Yorkshire puddings are little round things. Pah! Nonsense! A real Yorkshire pudding, ideally prepared in a Yorkshires range (though these days they are rare, I admit) should be done in a square or rectangular tin and cut up accordingly.

    Poky little round Yorkshire puddings… no wonder the world is going to rack and ruin…

  2. Ah, Yorkshire pud.

    Old-fashioned British cooking still gets sneered at, but my mother’s was marked by two characteristics: (i) her repertoire was small, but (ii) her standards were high. I look back on it with great fondness. We ate well, as marked by the “puppy fat” which I didn’t shed until I went to university.

    About lakes: your French lakes I don’t know but, by golly, I am a great fan of the Italian lakes. Wunnerful.

  3. As a true Yorkshireman, I trust these were square.

    Alas no, mine were round. Probably because I made them wearing a pink tutu and listening to Celine Dion.

  4. Old-fashioned British cooking still gets sneered at, but my mother’s was marked by two characteristics: (i) her repertoire was small, but (ii) her standards were high. I look back on it with great fondness.

    My mother’s was the same, only with a large repertoire. My Dad kept all her old recipe books, which I’ve now asked for.

    About lakes: your French lakes I don’t know but, by golly, I am a great fan of the Italian lakes. Wunnerful.

    They’re not all that far apart, and both sort of Alpine-ish.

  5. Yorkshire pudding, yesterday, was made in the roasting tin. Which was large enough for the 5-rib beef roast.

    They don’t rise well in that size of tin but they taste excellent.

  6. My mother’s bigger Yorkshire puds were made in an oblong dish. Nowadays “oblong” is seldom heard or seen. So’s “seldom”.

  7. Nothing wrong with an iPhone for taking shots in fact I would go as far as saying that it is a good discipline to get into for many reasons. It forces you to get back to basics and focus on framing, exposure, depth and pattern. Plus it stops you getting lazy and avoiding exercising your creative effort by saying things like “if I had a good camera I would take some shots here”.

    Some pictures of lakes taken by my son on his iPhone on our recent holiday to the South Island.

    http://postimg.org/image/gy31tb4y9/

    http://imgur.com/1s5ZJIb

  8. Nowadays “oblong” is seldom heard or seen.

    I use “oblong” a fair bit. It’s on a par with “rectangular” and definitely better than “rectangle”.

  9. Nothing wrong with an iPhone for taking shots in fact I would go as far as saying that it is a good discipline to get into for many reasons. It forces you to get back to basics and focus on framing, exposure, depth and pattern.

    True, which is why some photography guides tell you to put the zoom lens down for a month or two and shoot only with a prime, as it forces you to get into the right positions and think more carefully about framing.

    Plus it stops you getting lazy and avoiding exercising your creative effort by saying things like “if I had a good camera I would take some shots here”.

    This is a good point, one I’d not considered. Top marks for today, Bardon.

  10. Aunt Bessies Yorkshire puddings are as good as any i have tasted,you can do a whole roast in half an hour using her other products her sweet patato mash is to die for(prepare for incoming)

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