Diversity as Understood by Manchester University

Joe Blow in the comments under my post on the decline of Manchester University points me towards this post at Harry’s place:

It’s a shame Manchester Uni decided to adopt a policy of Boycott Divestment and Sanctions. I guess now they’ll be off the internet and their students will stop using their Apple Macs and mobiles.

Ah yes, the completely non-racist Manchester Students’ Union that embraces diversity – unless you’re Jewish:

On the night, Jewish students who argued against the motion were made to feel as if their concerns about their potential marginalisation were not being heard. Despite offering alternatives that included creating a discussion forum to engage with the Israeli-Palestinian debate, many on the Senate believed that a targeted BDS tactic was more constructive than any form of engagement.

Criticism of Israel and its policies is not in itself antisemitic, and there is plenty to criticise.  However, when an individual, group, or organisation singles out Israel or Israelis for particular criticism or treatment, or makes opposition to Israel its raison d’être, it is fair to ask what is the driving force behind it.

For example, if somebody says they believe Israel ought not to exist, it is perfectly legitimate to ask whether they believe any of the other 193 United Nations Member States should also not exist.  If the answer is no, as it always is, then one is entitled to draw one’s own conclusions as to why the only country in the world whose existence is forever questioned just so happens to be Jewish.  Similarly, if a university decides to boycott visiting academics from Israel and nowhere else, one may be forgiven for thinking the reasons behind it are rather simple.

Critics of Israel could also avoid charges of antisemitism if they were not so often sharing platforms with openly antisemitic people and their communications didn’t read as though they’d been copied chapter and verse from a Hamas press release.

Those behind the BDS movement, and by association The University of Manchester itself, might claim they are not motivated by hatred of Jews, but the rest of us are free to draw our own conclusions.  It is yet another reason for me to distance myself from my alma mater and to chuck the begging letters in the bin.

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13 thoughts on “Diversity as Understood by Manchester University

  1. Ah the Jewish question in Christian England. Kicked out and barred for life, snuck back in, interbred with the aristocracy, financed Empire and over achieved in the big end of town. What is is it that they are now up to?

  2. My line is always that Israel is probably about 70 per cent wrong in what they do, and Palestine/Gaza/Hamasville or whatever they call themselves these days, are around 95 per cent wrong. You pays your subsidies and you takers your choice.

    OTOH I don’t live in that part of the world, so what do I know?

    Oh yes, I know a Jewish lad who came to live here and signed up for the TA. Even took part in a bayonet charge, and his account of the fight is fascinating. But I did ask him, why choose Britain?

    He said that he read things like the Sharp books as well as military history and came to the conclusion that we Brits punched above our weight in battles, so he wanted to be part of the punching. It may have helped, of course, that he got to punch the Taliban (or Terry as he called them)

  3. If I were a gay atheist male/ independent minded female Arab from a Muslim background, there is only one country in the ME in which I would receive equal protection under the law.

  4. I would add that if you take any old antisemitic myth about Jews running all the banks, trading in children’s body parts, controlling the world’s governments from behind the scenes etc, and then replace the word ‘jew’ with ‘Israeli’, you really aren’t fooling anyone.

  5. “If I were a gay atheist male/ independent minded female Arab from a Muslim background, there is only one country in the ME in which I would receive equal protection under the law.”
    Don’t need to mention gay atheists. There is only one country in the ME where I would feel safe going to church.

  6. Bardon,

    What is is it that they are now up to?

    From what I can tell, hatred of Jews seems to stem mostly from the fact that they cooperate with one another to a greater extent than other groups and exhibit general competence, hence they often find themselves doing rather well in comparison to those around them.

  7. Well they do seemed to have moved up the dung heap a bit from the bad old days of blood libel, poisoning wells and spreading the plague.

  8. Stephen K,

    It is also the only middle eastern country where you would feel safe going to a mosque.

  9. ‘It is also the only middle eastern country where you would feel safe going to a mosque.’
    Very true and well said.

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