Cubans in Angola

A good piece on Fidel Castro from Bayou Renaissance Man, who is originally South African:

I was standing in the Angolan bush, along with a group of UNITA rebels.  They were cleaning up after a firefight – which meant leaving the enemy bodies where they had fallen, but stripping them of their weapons, uniforms and supplies.  Everything would be washed, cleaned, repaired if necessary, and reissued to new owners, who would use it to kill more of the enemy.

Among the dead were two very young Cuban conscripts, some of the tens of thousands of troops sent by Fidel Castro to prop up the brutal pro-Communist regime in Angola. They were probably well under 20 years old.  They hadn’t even finished growing;  they still had that gangling, slightly disjointed look of late adolescence.  Both looked as if they didn’t yet need to shave every day.  They never would, now.  Their AK-47’s were still half-slung.  They hadn’t even managed to raise them to a firing position before the RPD bullets found them.

A grizzled NCO looked down at them, and an odd look came over his face. He spat to one side, very expressively, and murmured, “Just one more. That’s all I ask.  Just one more.”

I looked at him, and my eyebrows rose.  He caught my expression, and nodded.  “I want the bastard who sends kids like this over here to die.”

It makes you wonder how many of those who complain about American forces deployed around the world had no problem with Fidel Casto sending his army to Angola.  The fact that Cubans had no choice in the matter makes it that much worse.

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12 thoughts on “Cubans in Angola

  1. Sort of related, if you see what I mean. Lot of stuff like this coming out now with Justin Trudeau shown to be looking a lot like Fidel, or at least as Fidel did when the old sod could light his cigar up. Probably unlikely, but given Justin’s bizarre lefty outbursts, it fits even more.

  2. I was on business in Cuba , mid seventies and I saw the trucks emptying bodybags into the hospital in Havana. The weeping relatives were opening the bags to see if it was their sons before they were ushered away.
    A Scots engineer working there on a long term contract told me that the relatives were not told where their loved ones were going , or why. Just that it was in the great cause.
    Poorest place I have ever been to, every scrap of food grown and fish caught taken by the soviets in return for arms and some sort of protection after the Hero Castro sold the nation’s soul to communism
    and now the mealymouthed Corbyn,Livingstone and Galloway etc praising Fidel as the second coming.
    Pass the bucket.

  3. Graham,

    Thanks for commenting!

    I was on business in Cuba , mid seventies and I saw the trucks emptying bodybags into the hospital in Havana. The weeping relatives were opening the bags to see if it was their sons before they were ushered away.
    A Scots engineer working there on a long term contract told me that the relatives were not told where their loved ones were going , or why. Just that it was in the great cause.

    Pretty much standard for Communists, that. I managed to get hold of a copy of Zinky Boys, about the Soviet soldiers sent to fight in Afghanistan, and it told much the same story.

    Poorest place I have ever been to, every scrap of food grown and fish caught taken by the soviets in return for arms and some sort of protection after the Hero Castro sold the nation’s soul to communism

    Yup, took their entire sugar production. How generous of the Cuban people, eh? If only they had a say in the matter.

  4. Watcher,

    Sort of related, if you see what I mean.

    Heh, yes. They were communists, so who knows what they shared? To each according to his need, etc.

  5. Not sure on the veracity of this but i was told that most of the tourist hotels in Cuba are built and owned by Spanish companies using Cuban labour,the Spanish insisted on paying well above Cuban rates for their employees the Castro regime agreed and took the money but being the bastards they are paid the Cuban employees $20 a month and pocketed the rest,and the BBC and the rest of the liberal prats eulogise the prick.

  6. I’ve met one or two South Africans who were conscripted and sent to fight in that war, too. It was really not nice for them, either. Two disgusting governments forced young men who had not the remotest reason for being in conflict with one another to go and kill each other in horrible conditions. Really not a nice thing at all.

  7. Michael,

    I knew a South African who fought over there, but I don’t think he was conscripted. I didn’t actually know they sent conscripts to fight in Angola, that’s pretty appalling. I never knew why the South Africans were fighting there in the first place, TBH.

  8. marc,

    I can well believe it. I read a quote the other day from a Cuban woman along the lines of “I like omelettes, but not enough to sleep with French truck drivers so I can enjoy one twice a month”. Cheap holidays in other people’s misery.

  9. The South Africans who told me about fighting there were certainly mystified as to why.

  10. “I can well believe it. I read a quote the other day from a Cuban woman along the lines of “I like omelettes, but not enough to sleep with French truck drivers so I can enjoy one twice a month”. Cheap holidays in other people’s misery.”But they get to see some nice 50’s era American cars powered by Russian tractor engines.

  11. But they get to see some nice 50’s era American cars powered by Russian tractor engines.

    Indeed. I must go and see such authenticity quickly before it gets “ruined” by capitalism.

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