The Alt-Right and Antisemitism

There’s a reason why I don’t think the alt-right is going to become a serious political force. Take this passage, written by a reader and posted at Chateau Heartiste:

Btw, just learned about some interesting studies, posted at the (((NYT)))

Basically they argue that single motherhood weakened mostly the male children, because the sisters in such one parent families perform better in life than the brothers. In normal families, there is no difference or brothers perform better.

In other words, the lack of father harms more the male child than the female child. Therefore if you want to weaken men, push for single motherhood. No wonder jews try to destroy the family in the West, while simultaneously strengthening the family in Israel. There is deliberate push to decrease male influence in western society because jews feel threatened by white males, and by their innate nationalism.

So the next time a woman tells you that there aren’t enough good men, you can answer her: there aren’t enough good men because they were raised by women.

The author is actually making a valid point: feminism’s war on the family and their push for single motherhood is harming boys, and this ought to be discussed more than it is. But look at what gets shoe-horned in there:

No wonder jews try to destroy the family in the West, while simultaneously strengthening the family in Israel.

Jews don’t go in for family values? Single motherhood is the goal of Jewish women? Really? I know what the author is trying to say: American Jews, in general, vote Democrat, particularly Jewish women. Lunatic third-wave feminism has been enabled if not encouraged by the Democrats, and therefore it is the Jews who are destroying American families. But they are looking after their own in Israel.

It’s nonsense, of course. Sure, there will be Jewish women contributing to the idiocy of third-wave feminism just as there are atheist white men, but you can hardly dump the whole movement at the feet of the Jews. And only an idiot with think that liberal American Jews in places like New York are the same individuals, and subscribe to the same politics, as Israelis.

This is just lazy, old-fashioned antisemitism: blaming the world’s ills on “the Jews” and lumping them all together as one bloc. The problem is, you don’t need to go far into the alt-right to find this sort of stuff. It’s a shame because, as I said, the overall point made by the author is a good one. The Jew-bashing sentence added nothing, and will only serve to put normal people off. If this is how the bulk of the alt-right will go about their business, they’re going to struggle to go mainstream. I know I’ve largely abandoned alt-right websites and Gab feeds because of the constant Jew-bashing, although to be fair most is to be found in the comments. I’m sure others have too.

Back in Paris

I’m back from Lisbon, and it was superb. Miles better, in my opinion, than the vastly overrated Barcelona. I’ll write a full report sometime this week, along with some photos. Hopefully I’ll put a blog post or two up today as well, but we’ll see: things are looking busy.

Luvvie Lovers Upset

The blogroll in my sidebar links to two blogs which specialise in films, and I have found both of them useful sources when looking for obscure films which pass under the radar but I nevertheless might like.  But being arsty-types, the proprietors aren’t half precious snowflakes.

Firstly, Mostly Film:

IF, in this Year Of Our Lord 2016 you think…segment after segment after segment on the living, breathing bowl-of-dicks now a month away from owning the nuclear codes aren’t topics for a late-night comedy show, then fuck you; you weren’t going to like it anyway.

Besides, when I called out this show for praise last year, there wasn’t a bona-fide narcopathic lunatic in the White House. When Last Week Tonight returns in February, god knows there’s going to be.

Satire pretty much never changes anything, sadly, and satire certainly didn’t stop Donald Trump being elected President. But if America’s shatteringly thin-skinned President-Elect is on (lying) record as being shatteringly thin-skinned about one particular piece of satire, then as far as I’m concerned, that particular piece of satire needs to keep doing what it’s been doing, only massively more so. Staying angry is the only response. That was this year’s finale’s message – don’t put up with this. You don’t have to put up with this.

Because if there’s one person in the world who doesn’t remotely care about deeply unsexy and boring institutional injustices that invisibly ruin the lives of the disadvantaged every single day, it’s that motherfucker.

Bless.  But wait, there’s more:

It’s a thoroughly satisfying film, although in a post-Trump world, it plays far more as an anger-inducing polemic than might otherwise have been the case. The tiny gains these women fought so hard for in terms of opportunity, respect and dignity, overthrown in a two-year campaign by a tiny-handed megalomaniac and his shit-for-brains supporters.

And more:

Hello to you all from Europe’s Best Website. Usually we take this slight breather to indulge in a bit of frivolity – a joke here, a quip there, a look at what we’ve come up with, and a glance at the upcoming treats the world has in store for our eyes and our brains.

This week, however – who gives the tiniest fuck about all that? When the world youactually live in takes a gigantic step towards a global fascist dystopia by handing the reins of power to the human equivalent of a massive bag of flaming dogshit, well, being snarky about upcoming movie trailers seems slightly beside the point. The caveat to that being if there was a film out there featuring a racist, woman-hating President-Elect being relentlessly bludgeoned to death by a crack team of angry gorillas – we’d definitely link to that. But there isn’t, so we can’t.

Next is Film Babble Blog:

In the age of Trump (man, I hated typing that), a story about fighting racism is as timely as can be, but this film teaches a lesson that would be just as important for people to learn and appreciate even if our country had elected the more qualified candidate.

As the saying goes, “those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.” Right now, when it sure looks like we are doomed, it’s more crucial than ever that we look back at the times that we as the people of this great, but greatly flawed country actually got something right.

And again:

A blast of a spectacular yet intimate feeling big-screen musical is exactly what we need right now as there’s a strong sense that there’s bleakness on the horizon.

And again:

This film also stirs up emotions about dealing with the difficult transition involving power changing hands next month. The Obama administration was as close to Kennedy’s Camelot as I fear we’re going get again in my lifetime. Such a movie as this is a must see in these scary times as it reminds us that America has gotten through dark times before and will again. This movie makes me want to believe that, despite the scariness of what’s on the rapidly approaching horizon, Camelot lives!

There are few things more off-putting on a blog which adequately deals with a particular specialist subject when the authors start to shoehorn in their political views. It’s fair enough if it is a political blog, but when you go to a site which advertises itself as being about films in order to read about films and you find crap like this…well, at least write something that doesn’t read like a transcript taken from a high-school debating class made up of particularly wet pupils.

Holidays

Tomorrow I’ll be going to Annecy for Christmas, so blogging will be light to non-existent until I return on 29th December.

I wish all my readers a very Merry Christmas, and thank you all so much for reading.

A Stronger Man than I

Further to this post about the mental disintegration of Australians, I see fellow blogger Adam has succumbed to the same weakness.  Having posted a review of this article, we learn from the comments that:

I didn’t make it through. I skimmed and cherry-picked and had everything I needed about a quarter of the way in. I have no idea as to the rest of it.

I confess, I couldn’t even make it past the first five paragraphs.  I’d rather open the batting against Dale Steyn than wade through that.  Adam’s scored the equivalent of a half-century under trying conditions.

Blogging like it’s 2003

I never used to read USS Clueless, a blog that was big back in the days of the medium’s infancy in the early ’00s, but I knew about it and saw it referenced a lot.  I also used to see the blog owner’s name, Stephen DenBeste, appearing quite often among the blogs I did read.  I read yesterday over at Samizdata that Stephen had died, which is causing a lot of sadness among the bloggers of that era who used to interact with him.

The first blog I ever encountered was Peter Briffa’s long gone and much missed Public Interest.  I read a Thunderer column he’d written in The Times in spring 2003 about the Stephen Lawrence murder and followed the address at the bottom.  Having not seen a blog before and expecting a regular website it took me a day or two to figure out what I was looking at.  I remember the blogroll causing me a lot of confusion: most websites back then had very few outgoing links, almost all were internal.  Or maybe I was just dense.

Anyway, once I’d gotten my head around the concept I launched my own blog in March or April 2003.  This was when British blogging was in its early days with most of us using Blogger software with awful, buggy templates, before Moveable Type and WordPress came along and things improved a lot.  The big American blogs were well established by then, particularly Instapundit and Little Green Footballs.  Probably the largest in the UK I knew about would have been Samizdata.  That spring/summer/autumn of 2003 was a wonderful time to be blogging in the UK because the number of bloggers was tiny: everyone knew one another and it felt like we were at the start of something big.  Very few of those who were around at that time are still blogging, but a few are.  Last night somebody asked me how long I’d been running a blog for and I said over thirteen years.  That’s quite a long time, particularly given I’ve been doing it while in Middle Eastern theocracies and Putin’s Russia.  It’s why I laughed once when somebody, who hadn’t even known what a blog was before reading mine, saw fit to give me stern advice on how I should conduct myself online.  Yes, thanks for that.

Perry de Havilland refers in his post about Stephen DenBeste to “the early days when we were all known as “warblogs””.  British blogging took off in 2003 as the Iraq War was being waged, and this is no coincidence: ordinary people were getting so fed up with the poor and/or obviously biased coverage of the war in the mainstream media that they got online and started adding their own voices to the noise.  As the sadly departed Norman Geras said in July 2003: I’m joining the conversation.  And oh boy, he did.

Blogging then became the next Big Thing and by 2005 seemingly everyone had a blog and companies were touting them as a vital way of sharing information.  People then discovered blogging required some talent either by way of style, ideas, or merely having something to say, and the numbers levelled off and then started to fall.  Facebook came along, and then Twitter, and now my guess would be we’re left with the hardcore bloggers who probably number around 10% of what there were at the format’s peak.  That’s just a guess, mind.  LiveJournal got huge in Russia, and I have no idea if they sustained their numbers.

Anyway, my point is that it was the dissatisfaction of a large number of people with the mainstream media’s coverage of a major global event that drove the growth of blogging, both in the US and Britain.  We are now in a period where people’s dissatisfaction with the mainstream media is plumbing new depths as it behaves abominably over issues such as the US election, immigration, and a whole load of others which people care deeply about.  Twitter and Facebook have already shown they are prepared to censor unwelcome opinions, which has left more than a few people voiceless (at least until Gab picks up and develops a smartphone app.).  Indeed, I’ve always been surprised how many bloggers – who had full control of their own hosting platform and content – switched to Twitter, where they had none of the former and now, we discover, not so much of the latter either.  The beauty of blogging for me was always that I run the site and its content is wholly mine and subject to nobody’s approval.  There is no “report inappropriate content” on this blog.

This period in the runup to the US Presidential Election is starting to feel a lot like the spring of 2003: plenty of angry voices and a feeling nobody is listening.  If Trump loses, the opposite side will try to silence them.  One way of making themselves heard is via a blog, leading me to believe that we might see a renaissance of blogging in 2017.

Either way, I’ll still be here.  Hopefully.