LGBThee

From Shell’s corporate website:

At Shell, we care about the diversity of our people because we believe that a fully inclusive workplace allows our employees to flourish and so allows our business to flourish.

When our employees excel, we excel. It’s for this reason that we are proud to support our lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) staff, promoting equality for employees regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Also from Shell’s corporate website:

Shell has been active in Brunei since 1929, when the first commercial oil find was made by the British Malayan Petroleum Company, owned by Royal Dutch Shell.

The Company was the forerunner to the present joint-venture company of Brunei Government and Royal Dutch Shell, Brunei Shell Petroleum Company Sdn Bhd.

Through the solid partnership between the Government and Royal Dutch Shell, BSP, Brunei LNG (BLNG), Brunei Shell Marketing (BSM), Brunei Shell Tankers (BST)/Brunei Gas Carriers (BGC) form the Brunei Shell Joint Venture (BSJV) companies which constitute the largest employer in Brunei after the government.

Shell Deepwater Borneo (SDB) is a 100% Shell Company that was established in Brunei as a result of Royal Dutch Shell’s acquisition of New Zealand based Fletcher Challenge Energy in 2001.

From The Guardian:

Brunei is to begin imposing death by stoning as a punishment for gay sex and adultery from next week, as part of the country’s highly criticised implementation of sharia law.

From 3 April, people in the tiny south-east Asian kingdom will be subjected to a draconian new penal code, which also includes the amputation of a hand and a foot for the crime of theft. To be convicted, the crimes must be “witnessed by a group of Muslims”.

It was a directive of the Sultan of Brunei, Hassanal Bolkiah, who is one of the world’s richest leaders with a personal wealth of about $20bn (£15bn) and has held the throne since 1967. He described the implementation of the new penal code as “a great achievement”.

So Shell demonstrates a firm commitment to LGBT rights via ultra-woke initiatives in places where minorities have been treated without prejudice for at least a decade while they bankroll a monarch who decrees homosexuals must be stoned to death.

Similarly, Total caved in to a shakedown by Accenture and signed (pdf) an LGBT charter along with a whole load of other French companies. Meanwhile, here’s their CEO and other senior executives signing a deal with the Iranian government:

Here’s some news from Iran:

The Islamic Republic of Iran publicly hanged a 31-year-old Iranian man after he was found guilty of charges related to violations of Iran’s anti-gay laws, according to the state-controlled Iranian Students’ News Agency.

The unidentified man was hanged on January 10 in the southwestern city of Kazeroon based on criminal violations of “lavat-e be onf” – sexual intercourse between two men, as well as kidnapping charges, according to ISNA. Iran’s radical sharia law system prescribes the death penalty for gay sex.

While oil company HR departments demand acceptance and celebration of LGBT lifestyles from their staff, their bosses are complicit in propping up the most murderously homophobic regimes on earth. But then moral codes have always been for the plebs while the priestly caste gets a pass, haven’t they?

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18 thoughts on “LGBThee

  1. Isn’t that the point? They buy brownie points on one side, then spend them on the other side.
    “Yes we’re cosy with brutal dictatorships, but look how tolerant we are!”

    At my current employer (a vast corporation), the rank-and-file workers don’t give two hoots for the LGBQWERTY stuff; but my boss’s boss has an LGBT Ally poster on his office wall, and his boss spent half of the last quarterly update meeting boasting about how gay-friendly they are. Both these men are very much heterosexual.

    My conclusion is that LGBT flag-waving isn’t sincere; it’s just a means of signalling to your superiors that you’re willing to forego your personal beliefs, to deny objective reality, in the service of the company. If the company says jump, you ask how high. The Emperor is wearing his splendid new clothes, and wow betide anyone who suggests otherwise. (The Soviets used a similar technique to identify reliable candidates for higher office.) Personally I’m going to plant a rainbow flag at my desk – once I get back from paternity leave – and see how fast I get promoted.

  2. Breaking news! Firms bend to the whim of government to be allowed make profits.

  3. My question: What if I’m a gay man working for Shell? Will they not send me to any projects in Brunei for my own good? Wouldn’t that open them up to lawsuits? If they did send me and I was arrested and facing the death penalty what is their responsibility then? Are they liable for putting me in danger?

  4. Andrew M “… brownie points…”

    Tee-hee-heeeee

    I REALLY need to grow up.

  5. Duffy asks a very interesting question — one that undoubtedly did not occur to the enlightened types who run Shell. However, we have to remember that these same major oil companies are places where senior executives can reliably be expected to say that they take the Anthropogenic Global Warming scam seriously, despite the overwhelming evidence that it is junk science.

    So BP talks Green-talk continuously — while incompetently flooding the Gulf of Mexico with oil. They can do this because the huge profits from legacy oil fields cover up management incompetence. It makes one wonder how much more profitable those big companies would be under competent management? There may be an analogy to Japanese “Just In Time” manufacturing systems — where the incentive for keeping inventories low was not just to reduce capital costs, but also to expose inefficiencies in their manufacturing processes.

  6. What if I’m a gay man working for Shell? Will they not send me to any projects in Brunei for my own good?

    I asked this question of an oil company once and got told a big fat lie: they said they send people everywhere regardless, but what they’d actually do is just not propose certain people to go to certain countries. If one insisted it would be interesting, but I don’t think that’s happened.

    But you’re right, there is a huge inconsistency here, one which opens them up to lawsuits. Oil companies are bound to follow the laws of the country they operate in, while at the same time promoting lifestyles on a global basis which fall foul of some of those laws.

  7. It makes one wonder how much more profitable those big companies would be under competent management?

    Possibly my favourite quote, attributed to John Paul Getty but probably wrongly:

    “The best business in the world is a well run oil company. The second best business in the world is a badly run oil company.”

  8. @Duffy,

    I was sent to a hell hole (by definition its a hell hole if it murders gays) instead of a gay person I’d be threatening lawsuits, especially if they were better qualified than me. I don’t want to go to these places either and I’d have to behave and conform to their twisted laws eg no alcohol, in just the same way they would. They’d only suffer if they broke the law.

    I did 10 days in Riyadh and that was more than enough for that type of culture, thank you.

  9. @Gavin Longmuir on April 2, 2019 at 7:25 pm

    So BP talks Green-talk continuously — while incompetently flooding the Gulf of Mexico with oil

    New definition of Flooding – 1/5 teaspoon (1ml) in Olympic swimming pool (2,500,000 liters)?

    Are you a journalist?

  10. British Petroleum shareholders lost a lot of money paying for cleaning up that 1/5 teaspoon of oil! And let’s not talk about the dead bodies.

    Lots of English guys are very defensive about BP, because of national pride, etc. Really, you should be more angry with BP than anyone else, because they let the side down and exposed the myth of British superiority.

  11. To be accurate, Pcar, since oil floats on the top you should be talking area not volume. And a fifth of a teaspoon of salad oil is a lot different from a fifth teaspoon of crude. Salad oil would produce a slight sheen on the water. Crude would stick to the spoon. Crude tends to congregate in lumps & wash up on beaches.

  12. Lots of English guys are very defensive about BP, because of national pride, etc.

    Maybe I’m from too young a generation or something but I’ve never seen any national pride for BP. It is seen as just another company (that happens to have British in its name). Though lots of Americans seemed to claim it about us after the oil spill.

  13. As I recall, a certain US president whose initials were BO seemed to make a big point of referring to a corporation widely known as BP as “British Petroleum”. Presumably there was some point to that other than mud-slinging, especially since the bulk of BP’s operations were in the USA

  14. Lots of English guys are very defensive about BP, because of national pride, etc.

    I’ve never seen that. During Macondo Cameron quite rightly objected to US politicians calling the company British Petroluem – a name it abandoned in 2001, and hadn’t been in popular use for a while even then – and Obama’s African-style threats and deliberate talking down of a company in which many British people had pension stock. Other than that, British people couldn’t care less about BP.

    Really, you should be more angry with BP than anyone else, because they let the side down and exposed the myth of British superiority.

    There is undoubtedly truth in the claim that the corporate management under Browne compromised safety, but the employees responsible for Macondo were all Americans working for BP’s American subsidiary.

  15. Browne compromised safety

    but, but, but; surely not; only right-wing capitalists do that not left-wing who protect workers.

    Is that fantasy? Or Hope

    .
    PS @bis cleaning blobs from beach easier than film on water

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