The Blue Dribble

US Democrats win House in blow to Trump

booms the BBC’s headline, whose coverage throughout the night would have you believe he’s just been turfed from office. In reality, the results are so mediocre even the BBC has had to tone things down a touch.

Many on the left were hoping for a “blue wave” during these midterms, which would see the Democrats retake the House with a workable majority. Most people were predicting a 35-40 seat advantage over the Republicans, who under Trump have been ineffective in Congress and divisive (but reasonably effective) everywhere else. It now looks as though the Democrats will have a majority of around 27 seats, which is slim by historical standards and few can deny they expected a lot more. Perhaps more importantly, the Democrats not only failed to retake the Senate but actually lost ground, conceding two seats to the Republicans.

What this means is, come January, the Democrats will start throwing every spanner in the works they can think of to unseat Trump. As the BBC says:

They could also more effectively block his legislative plans, notably his signature promise to build a wall along the border with Mexico.

If that wall was going to get built, funding would have been approved when the Republicans held the House and construction would have already started, so I doubt this will make any difference. As far as legislation goes, Trump’s administration hasn’t done much which is hardly surprising given Paul Ryan was in charge of that and he couldn’t even manage to draft an alternative to Obamacare. Where Trump has made the biggest impact is in rescinding a whole swathe of Obama’s executive orders, and appointing judges to the Supreme and lower courts. Given the Republicans retain control of the senate and no longer rely on independent votes, they ought to be able to continue with this apace. Liberals from coast to coast will be on their knees praying daily that Ruth Burger Gingsburg, who is 85 years old, hangs on until at least 2020.

But this is equally important:

The Democrats could now launch investigations into Mr Trump’s administration and business affairs, from tax returns to potential conflicts of interest.

The majority population would likely welcome some increased level of congressional oversight, but I suspect they’ll have a low tolerance for the sort of lunacy they were witness to during the Kavanaugh hearings. Assuming Nancy Pelosi is elected speaker without an internal bunfight, Trump will relish batting away one deranged accusation after another; he’s at his best when under attack from buffoons who think the old rules still apply and he can portray himself as the only sane person standing. That crazies on the Democrat side are already screeching for the House to impeach Trump doesn’t bode well for the next two years. They’re hedging their bets on the Mueller report producing something damning, but my guess is whatever’s in there will hurt Democrats more than Trump and he knows it. It’s telling that even Pelosi is distancing herself from talks of impeachment; perhaps she’s looked at the election results and realised that the lunatics the Dems ran fared badly while the more sensible ones did well. Whatever happens between now and 2020, the Democrats need to convince American voters they’re not mental, and this means behaving like adults in Congress. Can they manage it? I doubt it, but we’ll see.

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34 thoughts on “The Blue Dribble

  1. One advantage of the House result is that the Dem’s lunacy will continue to be open for all to see, keep the Trumpistas focussed.
    Heaven help us if the Dems wise up.

  2. You’ve got to love the BBC’s severe case of TDS. I don’t remember when the Republicans did far better in Obama’s 2010 midterms that they splashed it over the front page of their news website.

  3. It is sickening that as many people voted for the Democrats as did.

    Trump needs to get Killery tried and jailed. The evil that would boil out from around the Toxic Twosome that is the Clintons would blow the lid of the USA’s real enemies within.

  4. My take is this: two fingers to all politicians. Vanishingly few of them are on your side. A split congress means zero new laws are likely. That’s a good thing.

  5. Much as I would have liked the Republicans to have held the House as well as increasing their majority in the Senate, this result is actually an early Christmas present for Trump.

    He gets the perfect foil in a Democrat controlled House that won’t be able to resist some kind of impeachment talk, whilst continuing to appoint Federal judges and, hopefully, SC Justices, as well as continuing to rescind Obama’s Executive Orders.

  6. It’s telling that even Pelosi herself is distancing herself from talks of impeachment

    They can’t impeach him as long as Republicans hold the Seante; passing articles only for them to be voted down in the Senate would just make them look stupid.

    There are probably quite a few Republicans who are secretly glad that they can go back to blaming their failure to fulfil their promise to repeal the last president’s healthcare reforms on their opponents, rather than their own complete inability to come up with anything plausible to replace it with.

  7. S

    Not strictly true. They can impeach him, as the Republican House impeached Clinton, it would then have to go to trial in the Senate and be passed with a two-thirds majority. Which is where the Clinton impeachment failed and any Trump one would to.

    Don’t underestimate how much their base – and a lot of their representatives – really wants to go for Trump personally.

  8. That the BBC is so overwhelmingly pro-Dem and so anti-Trump is one of the reasons people like myself no longer believe the Corporation is anything but a reliable news source. I never watch Al-beeb news any more as I know they are incapable of reporting accurately and analysing properly. But then, anyone who anxiously portrayed ‘Mr Do-Little-But-Talk-Of-Myself’ Obama as a saint clearly is incapable of rational thought.

    Will Trump prosper from the mid-terms? I don’t know, but I suspect he is smart enough to make the most of whatever comes his way. It will be fun watching it all, just as it will be fun watching the likes of Ditzy Waters, Twitchy Pelosi, Fauxahontas and the insufferable Shrillary still grubbing around on the fringes.

  9. Not strictly true. They can impeach him, as the Republican House impeached Clinton, it would then have to go to trial in the Senate and be passed with a two-thirds majority

    Hm — does ‘impeachment’ refer just to the putting of charges, or to the whole process?

  10. Just looked it up in the OED:

    ‘ The accusation and prosecution of a person for treason or other high crime or misdemeanour before a competent tribunal’

    So yeah, the impeachment is the prosecution, regardless of whether that results in a conviction or an acquital.

    Fair enough.

  11. They can impeach him, as the Republican House impeached Clinton, it would then have to go to trial in the Senate and be passed with a two-thirds majority. Which is where the Clinton impeachment failed and any Trump one would to.

    Don’t underestimate how much their base – and a lot of their representatives – really wants to go for Trump personally.

    Also: don’t underestimate the cucklitude of the Republican party. At the time of writing (and assuming “independents” will vote with the Democrats), it’s 51-49 in the Senate. Could the Democrats find 18 treacherous weasels among their supposed enemies? I wouldn’t rule it out.

    I think you’re right that they probably will push for impeachment in the House. Their base will demand it, and I think they can convince themselves it’s strategically sound: sure, it won’t work, but let’s at least make Republican senators go on record supporting Trump’s presidency! We’ll force those bastards to put their name on it!

    Shit, for all I know that is strategically sound.

  12. The places Trump campaigned in were wins for the Republicans. Interestingly so were most of the places Obama campaigned in.
    I guess Trump chose his ground better than the Dems, again.
    And he got his priorities right, senators sit for six years, house members two, so maintaining a Senate majority has a longer lasting effect. Plus it facilitates both executive and judicial appointments.

  13. At the time of writing (and assuming “independents” will vote with the Democrats), it’s 51-49 in the Senate.

    It’s looking like it’s going to be closer to 55-45.

    Could the Democrats find 18 treacherous weasels among their supposed enemies?

    No. Not now Trump has proven he is still able to rile up his base. Had Trump turned out to be an electoral liability, then yes, the Republicans would have turned on him. But now, any Republican who was publically disloyal to Trump (and you don’t get much more publically disloyal than removing him from office) would face a very real chance of disgruntled Trump fans costing him his seat, either at the next primary or the next general election.

    Trump is safe, until the next election.

  14. This is probably the worst possible result for the Dems. They’ve won, a bit, so they’ll figure that the current strategy is working, but not enough to actually achieve much, so the lesson they’ll take is ‘More of the same gets us to victory!” If they’d managed to swing both legislatures then they’d have both a mandate and the power to go with the crazy cat lady approach to politics, but as it is they’ve won only enough that they can’t change track, when what they really needed was a thumping loss so they could get some adults back in the room and stop the crazy.

  15. The lunatics the Dems ran fared badly while the more sensible ones did well

    With the exception of Alex “Jenny From The Block” Cortez, who’s election will be viewed by future historians as another marker on the way to the Second Civil War.

  16. Trump does perform best when he has a target and he will beat Pelosi like a cheap drum. As for RBG, that’s when the fireworks will really start.

  17. I’m waiting for the first NYT or Washington Post advocating abolishing the Senate. “For democracy”, of course.

  18. The election was business as usual, the system is designed to be perpetually two-party, there never will be a blue or red wave. There are so many questions on the veracity of the electoral process if one would only care to look, then the illusion of choice of the two party system to cap it off, as if, as if, folks.

    Maybe I am wrong and Trump will do something about the many questions on the electoral process, but I am not holding my breath.

    “It’s easier to fool a man than to convince him he has been fooled” Mark Twain

    Over the past few decades we have had two Mafioso families exchanging office, then incomes a relatively unknown half black dude with a questionable background alienating the non-urbanites. Followed by a real estate mogul appealing to this new alienated cohort with the added benefit of fuelling the so-called urbanite lefties with hatred.

    Nothing much ever changes, except for more gridlock, more tension, more minorities in office as we continue to muddle on towards the new feudalism model that our masters desire.

    The Punch & Judy show will continue tomorrow.

  19. I’m waiting for the first NYT or Washington Post advocating abolishing the Senate.

    Me, I’m waiting for them to start complaining about the (possibly imaginary) scourge of “no decency at long last” Republicans wishing and praying for the death of Ruth Bader Ginsberg

  20. “when what they really needed was a thumping loss so they could get some adults back in the room and stop the crazy.”

    Dave Rubin’s been banging that drum for some time. We could with it happening to both the Tories and Labour here as well, but not at the same election as we’d likely end up with a LibDem/Green alliance. May or Corbyn is preferable to that outcome.

  21. …not at the same election as we’d likely end up with a LibDem/Green alliance. May or Corbyn is preferable to that outcome.

    That’s the kind of talk that keeps the husks of bad parties from achieving their necessary repose.

    Think of it in 12 step terms: the UK is addicted to unserious politicians, and, as with all addictions, you can’t get clean til you’ve hit bottom.

  22. It’s telling that even Pelosi is distancing herself from talks of impeachment; perhaps she’s looked at the election results and realised that the lunatics the Dems ran fared badly while the more sensible ones did well.

    Hmm, not sure about that – self-declared socialist Alexandria “bug eyed loon” Oscario-Cortez won seat in congress.

    Captain Kirk Mocks Alexandria Ocasio Cortez (BA Economics and International Relations – rofl)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rjpXAJ3hEBo

    Err, “international Relations” isn’t that geo-politics?

  23. @Watcher

    BBC/TheGroan on house prices is hypocrisy and bias. Most of their reporting is “Houses Too Expensive” Gov’t must do something. Then along comes Brexit and “Disaster – Houses may be Less Expensive”

    It’s no wonder UK trust in BBC declines month on month.

  24. Hmm, not sure about that – self-declared socialist Alexandria “bug eyed loon” Oscario-Cortez won seat in congress.

    Yeah, but that was in Brooklyn which is nutter central. Plus, people voted for her because she’s Hispanic rather than for her politics.

  25. Tim – Don’t know if anyone else is getting this but you have a ton of dodgy pop-up redirect ads on your site at the moment.

  26. Slightly encouraged by this, not only the sitting State Governor but the President crying foul both at the same time, that is a first, lets hope it gets legs.

    …………………………………………………………………………………….

    Protests Erupt Over Possible Recounts in Close Florida Elections

    The president and protesters echoed Gov. Rick Scott, the Republican nominee for Senate, who late on Thursday sued Dr. Snipes and another elected Democrat, Susan Bucher, the elections supervisor of neighboring Palm Beach County, accusing them of failing to transparently report voting results. “Rampant fraud” was underway, Mr. Scott charged from the steps of the Governor’s Mansion in Tallahassee, the state capital.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/09/us/florida-ballots-recount-scott-nelson-gillum-desantis.html

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