Hidden Purposes

Yesterday two stories were brought to my attention, which share a connection. Here’s the first:

All new police officers in England and Wales will have to be educated to degree level from 2020, the College of Policing has announced.

It said the training would help address changes in crime-fighting.

Prospective officers can either complete a three-year “degree apprenticeship”, a postgraduate conversion course or a degree.

The National Police Chiefs’ Council said the changes would “help modernise the service”.

Many people are unhappy with this, saying it will remove yet another formerly respected career path for the working classes. They are probably right, but this is a feature not a bug. As I wrote here, New Labour and their successors made it central policy to get more women into the professional workforce, and for more people to go to university. Well, a generation later we now have lots of middle class graduates, but what are we supposed to do with them? A sizeable chunk will have graduated with liberal arts or other degrees which are near-worthless to an employer, yet these people have been sold the lie they can expect professional employment anyway. One answer is to stuff them into state institutions and provide them with what passes for a career, sitting in pointless meetings, dreaming up rules, and shoving paper around, and that’s what’s happened. Eventually the institution in question will become little more than an employment scheme providing what is effectively welfare to the dim but entitled middle classes, its core function forgotten. I’ve provided plenty of examples in support of my opinion that the British police long ago stopped being police in the commonly-understood meaning of the word, and this latest announcement is fully consistent with that. Consider this statement:

The college’s Chief Constable Alex Marshall said the feeling was the nature of police work has changed significantly and officers were just as likely to be “patrolling online” as on the street.

“Cyber-enabled crime has increased,” he said, “So has the need for officers and staff to investigate and gather intelligence online and via information technology.”

He also said protecting vulnerable people has become a “high priority”, with officers now spending more of their time working to prevent domestic abuse, monitor high-risk sex offenders and protect at-risk children.

Even investigating a pub fight – which used to mean interviewing the victim, perpetrator and the bar staff – now also extends to researching videos, pictures and comments published online.

You don’t need a degree to be able to research videos, pictures, and comments online. Nor do you need one to work with vulnerable people. What this is about is shifting police work from the wet, windy streets to comfortable chairs in front of computers in air-conditioned offices – the type of job the government promised graduates with worthless degrees from mediocre universities. Also, I am sure it is no coincidence that this shift is occurring a few years after the police made considerable efforts to recruit more women, and made policing an attractive career choice for young mothers. It is a lot easier to comprehend this latest move if you understand what the British police is actually for.

Here’s the second story, provided by Phil B in the comments:

Germany’s armed forces are suffering from severe shortages of weapons and equipment that put the country’s ability to meet its Nato commitments in doubt, a parliamentary watchdog warned yesterday.

The German military is “not equipped to meet the tasks before it”, Hans-Peter Bartels, the parliamentary commissioner for the armed forces said as he presented his annual report.

Operational readiness is “dangerously low” and the country’s ability to take over a frontline Nato taskforce next year must now be “in question”, he warned.

The current purpose of the German army is not to defend Germany from outside attack or to fight anywhere. It could be argued that until 2011 it was a way of deferring university or employment for young men by making them do national service, but nowadays it doesn’t even do that. Its true purpose can be divined from these two paragraphs, though:

The hard-hitting report was seen as a direct attack on the current defence minister, Ursula von der Leyen, who is said to be unpopular with troops.

Ms von der Leyen has presided over a series of shortage scandals during her time at the defence ministry, at the same time as introducing initiatives such as creches and flexible working hours for soldiers.

So it’s basically an employment scheme for the progressive middle classes, much like the British police. Last November I wrote this about the US army:

In part, the purpose of the military is to serve as a vehicle (one of many) for progressives to enact their deranged fantasies as part of an overall aim of undermining society and the institutions on which it depends as far as possible.

I don’t know if this applies to the Germany army – is it even possible to make German institutions more progressive so they can undermine the country further? – but it certainly applies to the British police. So there’s it’s other purpose.

Does the BBC story make a little more sense now?

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29 thoughts on “Hidden Purposes

  1. Something similar is happening among the US armed forces also.

    RIght now it is nearly impossible to attain E-9 rank in the Navy without at least a 2 year degree. That’s ramping up. One of the long term plans is to make these official requirements for senior enlisted positions – culminating in requiring a 2 year degree to attain E-6 and a 4 year or higher degree to progress past that point.

    Functionally, it would be then end of any practical distinction between officers and enlisted in terms of qualifications. Not that any of these degrees will have any practical effect on the capabilities of the servicemembers – if a degree in film is enough to qualify you for a commission as a line officer . . .

  2. Something similar is happening among the US armed forces also.

    Yes, hence their increased use of mercenary groups who are a little less fussy about academic credentials.

  3. As a kind of “off topic” but relevant posting, I read a copy of the Simple Sabotage Field Manual by United States. Office of Strategic Services a while ago, available from Project Gutenberg here:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/26184

    Look at Section 11 – “(11) General Interference with Organizations and Production”. The document is complete but poorly formatted so do a search for “Find in page” for section 11 using the title quoted.

    Does that seem to fit modern organisations and Government departments? Don’t forget, this was written in 1944 and intended to encourage sabotage in occupied Europe. It seems to have been discovered by the HR and Managerial types as a template for good management practices, not as a way of destroying an organisation …

  4. Well yes. What we have been seeing for years is a steady increase in the power, pay and influence of the teaching profession. And vastly too many politicians believe their propoganda. Votes at 16 is another of their scams- what does a 16 year old know beyond what teachers tell him? School leaving age at 18? More jobs for teachers. 50% for university? More jobs at universities.
    The real trouble will come with 50% of the population seeing themselves as elite (they will have certificates to prove it after all):- overproduce elites and you have the makings of a civil war. Especially if the elite isn’t much cop.

  5. @PhilB: Good find, there! As you say, it’s almost like parts of it were used as an instruction manual.
    Saul Alinksy’s Rules for Radicals is also illuminating, and many of these techniques can be used against today’s ruling class.

  6. In my many years working doors in lpool and Manchester I met some hard men in the police TAG etc units. a degree might have been nice but the ability to intimidate and not be intimidated in return was essential. individuals in the crime world were perfectly capable of following officers home and finding out sensitive personal information, some little girl or geek is not going to do well in this world. A class of super smart officers dealing with cyber and terrorism is fine but the world always needs grunts.

  7. Like ‘degree qualified’ nurses – once the certificate is gained, all the nasty nursing jobs like cleaning up crap, helping patients eat etc are handled (if at all) by lowly health care assistants – once all coppers have ‘degrees’ the actual beat, preventing crimes etc will be beneath them, with PCSOs the only visible police presence on the street – and we’ve seen how effective they are!

  8. Does that seem to fit modern organisations and Government departments?

    Fit?! It seems to have been adopted as an operations manual! What a fantastic find, how did you stumble across that?

  9. >So has the need for officers and staff to investigate and gather intelligence online and via information technology.

    I think this mainly means scrolling through Twitter looking at right-wing accounts.

  10. They want the bluebottle’s ranks to be filled entirely with Common Purpose womiccumalobus offal . All of whom will have been through the full school to uni CM conditioning program. That is why Bliar wanted 50% at uni so the process that starts with their heads being filled with eco-freak shit from Day One of infant’s school (or whatever the CM shitshow is called nowadays) can be completed. Assuming their parents aren’t womi sludge to begin with.

    While I’m here Tim I’m posting a link to the “Sentencing Committee” report that proposes 6 years inside for free speech. I hope that everybody can take part in the “consultation” (to Aug 2018) and let these CM scum know our opinion of the tyrannical urges. And also please spread the link and encourage everybody we possibly can too comment adversely also.

    Like Leveson–defending freedom is becoming a close run thing. Maybe it always was. But if we lose freedom we will lose the lot. Sop we must do anything we can.

    https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/6.4328_Public_Order_Offences_Guideleines_Consultation_web.pdf

    Thanks

  11. While I’m here Tim I’m posting a link to the “Sentencing Committee” report that proposes 6 years inside for free speech.

    I saw that. No problem posting a link here.

  12. It also makes policemen poorer in that they will either earn less for 3 years while doing an apprenticeship to get a degree or have a massive debt.
    Why is that a good thing?

  13. Like Thud says, law enforcement needs tough cookies sometimes, and like Pat says we need to be cautious of self-defined elites. It says a lot that the people who say “you need a degree to do my job or to work several levels beneath me” tend to be middle-class respectable folk with degrees themselves. It is as if they cannot physically imagine the “lower orders” doing a decent job in their position. But I think this has a lot to do with how a certain kind of middle class graduate rarely mixes with the kind of person for whom university would be a pipe dream but nevertheless manages to get on perfectly well in life.

    In fact the police on the street level spend a disproportionate amount of time interacting with lower/working-class people because that’s disproportionately where the bulk of crime is. Police at the management may be more likely to deal with accountants, politicians, managers of other public services involved in joint initiatives and so on, but at the grunt-work end you want people who know and understand how people in the communities they police live and act and feel, how they speak (things that might be mistaken by a middle-class graduate for stupidity or an insult may simply arise from a no-frills kind of direct language), how they tend to react to situations, what stuff really matters to them (middle-class people may find a broken-down car moderately inconvenient because they’ll need a taxi or hire car for the day – but threaten to take a tradesman’s van off the road when he has a contract tomorrow and he’ll explode).

    An important part of British policing has traditionally been that the police were “of the people”. They are not something merely imposed from above. One of the main failings in policing over the last couple of decades has been with ethnic minority groups who never did get quite the same feeling that the police were of their community, understood their community and were devoted to the protection of their community. Their experience of the police was as a group of people largely alien to them and who often felt themselves to be superior to them. If they had seen more black and Asian officers and commanders from the 1970s on, if the police was seen to understand their issues and to represent a viable, respectable career path for their young’uns, I think it would have made policing more effective and communities safer. Given how crime is concentrated in(though not exclusive to) poorer urban areas I’d be quite happy to have a police force that is disproportionately full of working-class white and ethnic minority salt-of-the-earth types rather than graduate “high-flyers” who think they’re superior to the people they’re policing. (The kind of people being encouraged to join the police seem to be the graduate right-on twitterati who are such appalling snobs over Brexit voters, for instance. And incidentally, because of how different racial groups have different attendances at higher education, proportionately far less likely to be black.) This seems to me to be repeating the failures the police had with the black community in the 1970s and 1980s, where the “policing by consent” model utterly failed, and applying it to the working-class in general.

    An interesting comparison is how lots of lower-class people hold social workers in absolute contempt – again a group full of do-goodery and middle-class graduates venturing into alien territory to impose their values. I’m sure suicidal workers do a lot of vital, valuable work but they are viewed as incomprehensible, intervening, smugly superior child-snatchers by many of the communities they operate in.

  14. Hah, should be “social workers”. Autocorrect having a hissy fit and no edit button on this browser for some reason. I get the ads though. Provided the target market for this site is people who want to fall for a bitcoin scam or get a postal bride I’m sure the ads are raking it in!

  15. Autocorrect having a hissy fit and no edit button on this browser for some reason.

    Edit function has stopped working, I’m not sure why. I’ll see if I can fix it.

    Provided the target market for this site is people who want to fall for a bitcoin scam or get a postal bride I’m sure the ads are raking it in!

    I’m at the yacht chandlers as I type!

  16. It’s not just about giving the dim-but-educated classes jobs. As Ecks says, it’s also about purposefully filling up powerful institutions with their own people.

    When planning a revolution your first priority is to get as mnay of your own men into the police and army (and convert as many of the existing ones as you can), and then take over the media, the telephone exchange, the power stations, etc.

  17. ‘The German military is “not equipped to meet the tasks before it”’

    Few militaries are these days, so the trick is to reduce the size of the task. if you don’t give an armed force a purpose and equip them to do it, you can pretty much get by on doing recruitment ads just for the lolz. Like the one I saw last night of an armed patrol, plastered with camo, waiting patiently while a Mohammedan did his prayers.

    If the goal is to do nothing, then such virtue-ssignalling behaviour is fine. Question is, did Ahmed bring his own prayer mat or did the army provide one from the Quartermaster’s stores?

  18. Like the one I saw last night of an armed patrol, plastered with camo, waiting patiently while a Mohammedan did his prayers.

    Heh.

  19. I’m enormously impressed with the weapon on the tank on the right, in the pic on that Torygraph article. Presumably it fires a Combat Diversity Coordination Counsellor into the midst of the enemy to sow discontent & confusion.

  20. There are any number of badwhites who someday might encounter these PC cops and soldiers and who would greatly appreciate their incompetence.

  21. From the blog:
    “Consider this statement:
    … THIS IS NOT A TYPICAL DATING SITE…”

    The wife will be reassured, at least.

  22. Hector/Ecks

    I do get the feeling we are being taken over by Common Purpose sometimes. I know there are evangelical Christian organisations that do various mentoring/leadership training jobbies to try to get their adherents into positions of power or influence and I’m told the Chinese government does the same (see various controversies about the Canadian spy agency reporting foreign agents in senior positions in British Columbia, and issues in NZ and Oz – but also some “interesting” first-hand experiences I’ve had in which a Chinese official admitted they didn’t want all their bright young students in the West to come back home for precisely this reason). Nevertheless Common Purpose seems to have had an order of magnitude more success in getting people into top jobs across all the institutions. The KGB would be impressed!

  23. …increased [American] use of mercenary groups who are a little less fussy about academic credentials.

    Don’t you still have to have earned your bones in the regular military before the PMCs will take you, though? Perhaps if the military starts requiring degrees, then the PMCs will start taking people off the street and doing basic training themselves. Or, more likely, I don’t know what I’m talking about.

    Anyway, degrees for coppers. You’re bang on, all I would add is this: we’re often told it’s not the rank-and-file officers who subscribe to the latest PC/totalitarian hogwash, and privately they’re very unhappy about having to arrest people for Aggravated Tweeting.

    Well, now, they won’t be.

    P.S. Mr. Ecks: what in the name of Christ is “womiccumalobus”?

    P.P.S. MBE –

    …evangelical Christian organisations that do various mentoring/leadership training jobbies to try to get their adherents into positions of power or influence…

    There’s one of these round my way. They’ve already taken over the local council, which is now expensive and useless. (So no change so far.)

    I do get the feeling we are being taken over by Common Purpose… …Common Purpose seems to have had an order of magnitude more success in getting people into top jobs across all the institutions. The KGB would be impressed!

    Peter Hitchens says New Labour were all died-in-the-wool commie radicals, and that it was long-standing practice among the cleverer of those types to not actually join the Communist party or anything official, so that they couldn’t be tied back to the movement. Apparently one of the first things they did in 1997 was have destroyed all the records MI5 had on them.

  24. “P.S. Mr. Ecks: what in the name of Christ is “womiccumalobus”?”

    Please don’t ask.

  25. Don’t you still have to have earned your bones in the regular military before the PMCs will take you, though?

    Yes, but it’s not long: one tour in an infantry regiment which has seen some action will suffice, from what I can tell. They’ll quickly weed out anyone who doesn’t measure up.

  26. Peter Hitchens says New Labour were all died-in-the-wool commie radicals,

    Indeed, which is why I think Corbyn & Co. are merely continuing along the trajectory that New Labour set them on, and laugh at the Blair fanboys who wring their hands and say “Oh, but this goes against everything Labour stood for!”

  27. The “over-credentialling” is widespread.
    Coppers here have had to have a university “degree” for more than 20 years. It is a “Diploma of Justice Studies” or somesuch bogus name.
    Apparently the “course” is such that even my dog would pass it.

    On a slightly different tack, the pointless credentials are not limited to the Plod.
    There is so much credentialling required for the pub trade that it usually takes a day & a half to get all the “induction” done before anyone can start work at my place. The induction for waitresses to carry plates to tables is 17 x A4 pages in length, and must be signed by them before they start.

    There are Five such inductions, all under different umbrellas, that ALL my staff must understand, sign, and in some cases “pass” before they can start work.

    Plus there is a certificate (or licence) each barmaid must obtain from the government to be allowed to pour beer.

    All of this to work as a barmaid, under direct and personal supervision of senior staff.

    It is cheaper & easier to hold & maintain a Road Train driver’s licence.

    There must always be a holder of a “Manager’s licence” on duty. This licence is far more difficult & far more expensive to obtain than a Road Train Driver’s Licence. It also has a renewal period of Three years, at which time the holder must commence “training” at ab initio stage all over again, pass the course (again) then apply for the licence (again).
    The course is Two days in length, in a classroom, with an exam at the end.

    I am not making this up.

    There are severe penalties for breaches. The police have devolved to making random spot checks to verify the credentials of the manager of duty.

    I have never seen the police avail themselves of the opportunity to do a quick recce of the pub to see if perchance any of the Ten-most-wanted happen to be in there (there once was, & Plod did not want to know about it)

    Even when they turn up at One a.m. with more than Six officers, all dressed like paratroopers, and spend more than an hour going through my paperwork (going through paperwork may take cops longer than it would take anybody else – due to reading comprehension issues)

    They go through the paperwork to see if they can detect any breaches. Once on a 12.30 a.m. raid they sifted through the ledgers until they found a day where 6 months prior, a “Manager on Duty” had signed on but neglected to sign off.

    $1,000 on-the-spot fine.

    I could go on all day with similar examples.

  28. Steve at the Pub

    That’s both absolutely fascinating and completely depressing. I have the horrible feeling that’s a vision for our future…

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