Using Rape as a Trump Card

I’m going to use an example provided by Natalia Antonova, who I’ve written about before, to illustrate something which is rather common among feminist writers. Meaning, I’m not necessarily picking on Antonova, but – like Laurie Penny who does much the same thing – she’s a rich source of readily-available examples of various points I’m trying to make about modern feminists. Consider this Tweet:

The context is a little hard to explain, but it comes as part of a discussion kicked off by Antonova’s rather bizarre claim that “men and boys are owed women and it leads to violence”. That in itself ought to reveal something of the mindset of the woman and the movement she typifies, but her response to the above tweet is where it really gets interesting:

Firstly, I have no idea how that remark serves as a response to Jesse Austin Wright’s tweet. I just don’t see how one follows the other, but maybe that’s just me. But let’s consider what Antonova is doing here. She’s bringing up her violent rape in order to win a rather petty point during a lengthy Twitter argument. Note she’s not bringing it up in any context related to rape, it’s part of a discussion on the position of nerds in society. She’s using her victim status to elevate her moral standing in the argument to a height against which Wright can’t compete. I mean, what kind of monster would continue arguing with someone who’d been violently raped, right?

This is something I’ve noticed about women who champion the MeToo movement and talk about “rape culture” in the US and UK: they often use their ordeals to given them moral authority, often on subjects which are wholly unrelated. There is nothing wrong with sharing their experience as a way of dealing with the ordeal or trying to ensure others don’t suffer the same treatment, but this is often not what happens. Instead, their being raped or sexually assaulted is wielded like a trump card, to be deployed whenever they are losing an argument or wish to further some crackpot feminist theory.

Without wanting to engage in amateur online psychiatry, you might want to consider the mentality of someone acting in this manner, particularly if they’ve put themselves forward as a mouthpiece of a movement demanding sweeping social changes which will in all likelihood make you worse off. As I said, Antonova’s behaviour is depressingly common among feminists caught up in the MeToo movement; it’s why they should be ignored, or urged to seek help.

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18 thoughts on “Using Rape as a Trump Card

  1. I wonder if it wouldn’t be fun to spend just a little time with a woman with viscous and degrading ways.

  2. Stella Gibbons got there first in ‘Cold Comfort Farm’. It’s the ‘something nasty in the woodshed’ trump card.

  3. Viscous? how does the Reynolds coefficient apply to squishy nonconsensual interpersonal relationships? Incidentally, I don’t for a moment believe this young lady was raped. Being raped has become a ticket to be punched for young ladies hoping for a gig on commentisfree or jezebel or similar.

  4. Without wanting to engage in amateur online psychiatry

    That’s all right, I’ve more than enough for two.

    I don’t for a moment believe this young lady was raped.

    Beat me to it. I don’t doubt something happened that this woman is calling “violent rape”, and that the rest of us would describe as something rather less traumatic. Most women who were actually “violently raped” are reticent to talk about it in any circumstances.

  5. She’s a deranged moron. Just like the twitter loons who support her. No point in arguing with them, it would be like trying to reason with a meths drinker outside Tooting Broadway station.

    In a better and brighter world they’d all be humanely clubbed like baby seals and recycled into pet food.

  6. Being raped has become a ticket to be punched for young ladies hoping for a gig on commentisfree or jezebel or similar.

    It certainly appears that way, yes.

  7. I don’t doubt something happened that this woman is calling “violent rape”, and that the rest of us would describe as something rather less traumatic.

    I agree, I expect she’s exaggerating, in no small part because of the usefulness of doing so when peddling her agenda.

    Most women who were actually “violently raped” are reticent to talk about it in any circumstances.

    Indeed, let alone make flippant remarks like “Tell me about being an easy target again, bruh.” while doing so.

  8. Using one’s own “victim” status to provide moral authority in an argument–which essentially becomes a shield from any counterarguments and a full stop to further discussion–is a classic tool of the Left. The fact that the personal narrative of victimhood may be fabricated entirely is beside the point. The purpose is to end the debate and silence contrary views, ignore opposing evidence, and dismiss logical reasoning. It’s sort of a reverse ad hominem in that the speaker invokes some logically irrelevant aspect of his own character or history instead of slinging insults at his opponent.

  9. If she was, indeed, raped, then she needs significant therapy. She’s living her life in a rage. Doing a job like that where she’s constantly ragging about men, rape, etc. can’t be good for your mental health. The job is actually a form of self-abuse; an act which rape victims often do to themselves. Well, that’s my theory of the week. Back to my armchair.

  10. “If she was, indeed, raped, then she needs significant therapy.”

    If only Dr H Lecter were still practicing….

  11. “Firstly, I have no idea how that remark serves as a response to Jesse Austin Wright’s tweet. I just don’t see how one follows the other, but maybe that’s just me.”

    Simple answer [viscous in fact] – radical feminist nutter.

  12. I received my Cambridge alumni mag the other day and even there they now have a something something officer focused on these issues. She highlighted the importance of her role with the statistic that 70% of all students are sexually assaulted whilst at university. Given our rough 50:50 ratio that implies anything on the line from 100% of women and 40% of men, to 40 / 100.

    As with the wider #metoo concept I don’t believe the tragic cases benefit at all from the approach of making everyone a victim – though it strongly
    benefits some pushy, vocal newly created victims.

  13. “70% of all students are sexually assaulted whilst at university”

    Which might be plausible depending on your definition of sexual assault. I heard a similar number once, I Think higher, that [90%] of undergrads have “received unwanted sexual advances”.

    So I thought back to my student days and found myself wondering about what the hell the other 10% had actually been doing with their free time.

  14. If she was, indeed, raped, then she needs significant therapy. She’s living her life in a rage. Doing a job like that where she’s constantly ragging about men, rape, etc. can’t be good for your mental health.

    That’s what I think, too.

  15. She highlighted the importance of her role with the statistic that 70% of all students are sexually assaulted whilst at university.

    Ah yes, because fathers often pay tens of thousands of pounds for their daughters to go to places where the danger of them being raped is higher than African war zones.

  16. So I thought back to my student days and found myself wondering about what the hell the other 10% had actually been doing with their free time.

    Engineering. Ahem.

  17. She’s living her life in a rage.

    Seems awfully common these days, at least for women. It’s a known side-effect of certain contraceptives. Often these women then take antidepressants and other drugs, which only worsen the rage.

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