Tim Stakhanov

There are people out there who believe I’m lazy. Close friends, family members, work colleagues, for example. They’re probably right.

But this month I broke my record of 56 blog posts in a month, set in November 2016 when Trump got elected, with 61 posts (not including this one). I don’t set out to write X number of posts per day, I write whatever pops into my head and sometimes there are a lot of subjects I want to comment on. This month was particularly bountiful in that sense.

The blog readership is increasing too, having well surpassed the target I’d hoped for a year ago. For that I have all you lot to thank, especially because half the attraction is the discussion in the comments.

Have a very Happy Easter.

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38 thoughts on “Tim Stakhanov

  1. If I could be arsed to get up from the sofa I’d give you a standing ovation. Lazy? You don’t know the meaning of the word!

    As to your commentators, yes, they are part of the reason you have built a good blog here. Commentatory curation is an unsung virtue, which you share with Tim W; well, at his eponymous site, not so much at his new Conti.

  2. Well done – I’m particularly glad to have discovered your blog since Tim W’s has now been taken over by tumbleweed.

  3. What roughly are the viewing figures compared to the number of commentators? It always surprises me as a commentator that a blog like this, which has a “community” feel, has lurkers… But rationally I imagine lurkers must make up the vast majority of the audience, as tends to be the case on most sites.

    I think the comparison with Tim W should be taken as high praise. I don’t imagine you want to start taking requests but I have to say one of the best things about Tim W when he is on song is that he can be very informative/educational about some of his key topics – economics, the finance system, metals – whereas most of the posts here, particularly recently, are straight opinion pieces. Your best stuff, or at least what I felt I was getting the most out of, tends to involve dissection of places you’ve lived (Russia/Thailand/France/Nigeria particularly) and even more so, engineering and the oil industry, but I appreciate you not wanting to mix up the blog with work! Having said that you do seem to have developed significant expertise in the fields of polyamory and modern dating, though I dread to think how…

  4. “Have a very Happy Easter.”

    Good food, good wine, good family company, and no madness about searching for Easter Eggs in the rain.

    Mark you, when I was wee we didn’t hunt for eggs, we decorated them (real eggs, that is) as Red Indians, and then rolled them down a brae. I wonder if someone should do that to Senator Warren.

  5. Not lazy, but not rich either and I know you don’t care about that. Happy Easter to you as well, I am having a great weekend, walked with family today to a special dietary cafe that took me through some really spectacular suburbs with modern architecture and magical bonsais.

  6. I too have wondered how you managed to be so productive while holding down a job in the oil patch, and I finally understood when I glimpsed a shadowy figure crouched over a laptop on a park bench in the Bois De Boulogne. Obviously, your employer cashiered you some time ago, and being too embarrassed to fess up to your wife and your readers, you have continued with the pretence, leaving the house at seven in the morning, returning at six. There is no shame to being offed Tim, now is the time to man up and confess. Come in from the cold my dear fellow!

  7. What roughly are the viewing figures compared to the number of commentators?

    I’d say the ratio is around 20:1 lurkers to commenters. Maybe 15:1 or 30:1. That sort of order.

    It always surprises me as a commentator that a blog like this, which has a “community” feel, has lurkers… But rationally I imagine lurkers must make up the vast majority of the audience, as tends to be the case on most sites.

    I expect some lurkers don’t read the comments, but I know a lot do.

  8. I finally understood when I glimpsed a shadowy figure crouched over a laptop on a park bench in the Bois De Boulogne.

    At least I wasn’t bent over a park bench in the Bois de Boulogne!

  9. I think the comparison with Tim W should be taken as high praise.

    I do. 🙂

    I don’t imagine you want to start taking requests…

    The thing is, different readers like different stuff and I don’t know who likes what. But in any case, my approach to all the writing I do is to write whatever I want and see who likes it. So if a topic comes into my head and I think I’ve got something to say, I’ll write it. I knew the novel I wrote wouldn’t appeal to everyone and I could have changed it to widen its appeal, but I think if you start writing to please other people then you’re finished. The only topic I’d like to cover more is my professional stuff and the oil industry in general, but for obvious reasons I need to steer clear of it.

  10. The only topic I’d like to cover more is my professional stuff and the oil industry in general, but for obvious reasons I need to steer clear of it.

    100% understood and respected! Always thought you were very brave to post under your own name. Or foolish, one or t’other.

    Don’t let your postings on here distract from producing your difficult second novel 🙂

  11. @Tim

    I hope you are not implying you’ve been passing other people’s posts for your own in a state-directed effort to pressure other blog workers into increasing output.

  12. Always thought you were very brave to post under your own name. Or foolish, one or t’other.

    When I started blogging in 2003, everyone posted under their own name and SJWs and all this taking offence at everything wasn’t like it is now. In hindsight it would have been better to have used a pseudonym, as I have to in trouble with employers over stuff I’ve written. But I’ve actually changed my mind on that: writing under my own name makes me think carefully about what I say, rather than saying stuff which perhaps I shouldn’t confident I’m hidden behind a pseudonym. Also, staying anonymous is not that easy, so I’m told, and there is always a danger you will slip up and accidentally reveal yourself; that’s something I don’t have to worry about. Finally, I’m at the point now that any employer who complains about my blog – either because of what I write or that I have one at all – is letting me know they’re people I would not want to work with.

    Don’t let your postings on here distract from producing your difficult second novel

    One compliments the other; the more I blog, the better my writing gets, and the gains get put in my books. 🙂

  13. “One compliments the other; the more I blog, the better my writing gets, and the gains get put in my books.”

    Quick, fix the c-word before dearieme gets here! Encouraging to see the plural form of “book” here.

    “…writing under my own name makes me think carefully about what I say, rather than saying stuff which perhaps I shouldn’t confident I’m hidden behind a pseudonym. Also, staying anonymous is not that easy, so I’m told…”

    “Would I post this under my own name” is a good test for writing anything on the internet in general, though a self-enforcing rule in your case! And yes, you’ll never be “outed” and I think there is an illusion of anonymity online, particularly if you’ve been posting long enough and include personal titbits now and then. If anyone wanted to find out who I was, they’d have to make a long slog through many years of posts to find enough bits to put together, but it’d certainly be possible to identify me uniquely. Would anyone bother? Well there are some strange types out there. Tim Worstall had someone do a full run-down on him a couple of years ago (might even be last year) – potentially controversial writing 10+ years old, personal and career stuff, business dealings, scraps from old websites that hadn’t been maintained for years – and posted as an attack site. I don’t recall that Timmy cared, but a lot of patience and effort had gone into it. Someone with far too much time on their hands, clearly. I have no doubt that any pseudonym would have been cracked.

  14. “There are people out there who believe I’m lazy. ”

    Productive laziness, it’s a thing.

  15. At least I wasn’t bent over a park bench in the Bois de Boulogne!

    I was going through a phase of losing my contact lenses, if you must know. And it was only three or four times a day. Usually. Don’t judge me.

  16. A lot of the time when i read your blog, any comment i might make has been already said and probably better than i would’ve put it… So i read and go.

    I’m not sure if lurker is quite the right word for non-commenting readers though! Someone walking through the bushes cannot be said to be lurking in them 😃

  17. Lazy? You don’t know the meaning of laziness until you buy a self winding watch … Now THAT’S lazy! >};o)

  18. Nothing better than being lazy. The elder Prussian General Moltke divided his officers along two axes, Lazy-Industrious and Clever-Stupid. The lazy and clever he made commanding officers, as they would find the easiest and most economical way to perform a task, the industrious and clever he would make staff officers, to ensure everything was carried out correctly. The lazy and stupid he would dump into any position where they couldn’t do to much damage, and the industrious and stupid he would dismiss because they would otherwise cause pointless damage.

    All of which goes to show we would be so much better off governed by lazy people.

  19. squawkbox,

    Indeed, and I fit perfectly into the lazy and clever box. If ever I was in charge of a company, or went into management consulting, I would make a point of advocating hiring lazy and clever people. I think organisations are really missing a trick here, and most seem to prefer the ambitious and stupid.

  20. squawkbox

    I think you may have mis-squawked: that theory belongs to Kurt v. Hammerstein though you will have to scroll towards the bottom of this article to find the reference.

  21. I for one am grateful. It gives me something to read and complain about. I can’t wait to see your writing improve.

  22. Jeez, is it that bad?!

    Of course not. One of the things that makes this blog worth following is that the pieces are well written and clear. The comments are worth reading too, of course, whereas elsewhere (NNnP) comments can serve to compensate richly for atrocious writing on interesting topics.

  23. One of the things that makes this blog worth following is that the pieces are well written and clear.

    Ah, thanks! My faith is restored…

    NNnP

    Heh! Your familiarity with obscure British terminology and slang surprises me once again!

  24. Bloody sycophants the lot of them. I think your writing is shite and I only come here for the free porn and cake recipes (which, by the way, you’ve been very lax at posting recently).

    Oh, hang on, that’s a different blog.

    Carry on, as you were.

  25. Can’t think why. I was born in London and have probably lived overseas for less time than you!

  26. “I too have wondered how you managed to be so productive while holding down a job in the oil patch, …………………….. Obviously, your employer cashiered you some time ago, and being too embarrassed to fess up to your wife and your readers”

    I was thinking along the same lines when your productivity on the blog shot up in recent times.
    Still no idea how you manage to work and write so much. The drop in the oil price has had the opposite affect on me, I’m now working 15 hour days just to keep my head above water (poor me!). I think I maybe need to start considering the easy life of working for an Operator instead of $hitty Contractors.

    PS. Have finally got round to starting to read the book. Enjoying it so far. I can’t help thinking it is partly autobiographical though?

  27. Still no idea how you manage to work and write so much.

    Yeah, I’ve been asked this before. I could write a book on how I do it, but the short version is:

    1. I think fast and type fast. An idea pops into my head, I figure out what I want to say in a minute or two, and structure the post as I type – and I type fast without making many mistakes. A quick proof-read at the end, and then I hit publish.

    2. I don’t have family, and I work a 15 min walk from where I live. Lighthouse keepers envy me for the amount of free time I have.

    3. Let’s just say my entire career has been spent, regardless of company or job title, doing menial, process-driven admin. work surrounded by people who aren’t very well organised. I am extremely good at writing reports and generating excel spreadsheets, and communicating in a very clear and simple manner. I’m also good at recognising patterns in work processes and identifying ways to make my job easier without compromising quality, and I can anticipate better than most. Like I say, I could write a whole book on this.

  28. Can’t think why. I was born in London and have probably lived overseas for less time than you!

    1. Bison are not native to London.
    2. I thought you were ein German!

  29. 1) Bulls enjoy china shops;
    2) Technically I’d admit to ½ though rising nearer to 1 when teasing BiG 🙂

  30. The writing here is thought provoking, usually succinct and usually amusing. I wish I could replicate it. I can’t wait for it to be *even* better?.. The first draft of the novel, less so, but you’re clearly lazy enough to have rewritten it over and again, got a review from the horde here, got an editor, got a graphic artist design a cover and self publish.

    I think you need a better benchmark of laziness. Your range of laziness seems wrong to me. Clearly you don’t have kids to drain your energy and allow you to set new lows in achieving personal stuff.

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