A Very Modern Appointment

The BBC has put up a wholly uninteresting article about Lily Cole’s role in a Bronte Museum. Every year or so I hear this woman’s name and have to remind myself who she is: a model-turned-businesswoman who studied History of Art at Cambridge. What’s much more interesting is the actual blog post written by one Nick Holland which started the row:

Over the last few years it has become increasingly apparent that something is rotten in the state of Haworth’s Brontë Society. Annual General Meetings have descended into open warfare between modernisers and traditionalists, but it seems now that the council is being run along the lines of BBC farce W1A. For the last two years or so, a consultancy has been advising the Brontë Society on what to do – with pathetic results.

The drive now is for one thing – attracting a young audience. Being trendy is the ultimate aim, with the Brontës themselves relegated to the sidelines. The museum has a wealth of Brontë treasures, but they are now favouring the display of artificial items they feel will appeal to a modern audience.

From what I heard at the time, and what I’ve seen shared on social media, many people believed these ridiculous items were authentic, when the fact was the authentic items were locked away in storage. The rot had set in.

The drive to attract younger members to the Brontë Society is a pointless one. We hear people say, echoing the consultants, that the membership is too old – ‘look at the events, look at the meetings, everyone is old!’ In today’s society it has become a crime to be old.

This could have been written about pretty much every major Western organisation or body I can think of. With the long march through the institutions complete, the cultural Marxists are now sweeping up what they didn’t capture first time around.

This is relevant, too:

I am unfortunate enough to have encountered Lily before as a few years ago I had a front row seat of a new play about Helen of Troy at Manchester’s Royal Exchange Theatre. Lily had the title role, and the play was so bad that it is the only one I have ever walked out of at the interval. If the acting was bad, and believe me it was, the dialogue was even worse – one line in particular was of such clunking ineptitude that it has remained with me forever: ‘women smell my power, men smell like sex’. It was when Lily delivered this line with all the passion of the announcer at Piccadilly station that I began longing for the train home.

Things rarely improve once a dose of modern feminism has been injected, do they?

This was, quite simply, the worst play I have ever seen, and the writer of it? Simon Armitage, the incumbent creative partner at the Brontë Parsonage Museum. So here we see one of the many problems with Lily’s appointment – nepotism. Nepotism is a disease particularly rampant in literature, so that the best way to get a book deal is to be a journalist, a celebrity, or a friend or relative of one. This is particularly evident at this time of year, when newspaper’s lists of the ‘books of the year’ feature writers bigging up those who share the same agent or publisher – an act known as ‘log rolling’. We now have a Brontë log roll, as Simon Armitage passes on the baton to his friend Lily Cole.

This is how #metoo campaigns start.

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16 thoughts on “A Very Modern Appointment

  1. The long march through the institutions continues . If this affecting the bronte museum is there any place left untouched

  2. If this affecting the bronte museum is there any place left untouched

    Companies employing mercenaries running black ops for the CIA? Otherwise, no.

  3. “The drive now is for one thing – attracting a young audience.”

    Again, this is something replicated right across the UK and I suspect further. It is the cause of decline in many organisations, including newspapers and (a favourite grumble of mine) The National Trust. The latter now seems to be less about preserving important buildings and landscapes and artifacts, and more about advertising campaigns featuring “experiences” and a wonderful self-regarding lifestyle of organic eco recycling multi-cultural waffle.

    Although it certainly has something to do with Cultural Marxism, my feeling is that this is merely marketing people being smart. Older people can’t be milked for much longer. They’ve got the numbers and more money, but if you get the hearts and bank details of the young, then you’ve got a much bigger slice of a pie that’s still being cooked. And the young have the disposable income, which is what matters. If Cultural Marxism is what young professionals have been exposed to at Uni., then that’s what will sell. Can I interest you in some feel-good merchandising about how cruel your ancestors were? Or maybe some fair-trade tat made in the 3rd. World?

    A quick word about Ms. Cole. She looks quite striking – the sort of person you would notice in a new group of people you had been introduced to. But then you would ask yourself if she was attractive, or appealing, and odds on the answer would be “No”. She looks like the sort of odd girl who seeks attention by emphasising the oddness of her looks, and this gets annoying very quickly.

  4. Ahh, Lily Cole.

    A selection from Vulture Central, regarding impossible.com;

    Link

    It’s all quite, interesting.

  5. A selection from Vulture Central, regarding impossible.com;

    Yes, it was a story about Impossible.com where I’d first heard of her, possibly over at Worstall’s, but I can’t remember what the context was. Probably about the taxpayer funding.

  6. “Things rarely improve once a dose of modern feminism has been injected”

    Okay lets assess that and say compare this modern English SJW’s Manchester performance against a comparable English female social advocate operating in the slums of Manchester during Bronte’s time. Dedicating her life and working tirelessly and at great personal risk and all this quite selflessly done for the wellbeing of others, dealing daily with life threatening diseases TB, consumption and the like, unchecked violence with no safe places or counsellors to turn to. And most probably a demure, pious Christian type of lady as well.

    No marked improvement noted.

  7. One thing about us older folks…..we have all the money,surely that matters? if not we have plenty things to spend it on.

  8. Sam Vara,

    “Although it certainly has something to do with Cultural Marxism, my feeling is that this is merely marketing people being smart. Older people can’t be milked for much longer. They’ve got the numbers and more money, but if you get the hearts and bank details of the young, then you’ve got a much bigger slice of a pie that’s still being cooked. And the young have the disposable income, which is what matters. If Cultural Marxism is what young professionals have been exposed to at Uni., then that’s what will sell. Can I interest you in some feel-good merchandising about how cruel your ancestors were? Or maybe some fair-trade tat made in the 3rd. World?”

    I tend to agree that it’s not about cultural marxism, but there’s some bad assumptions if people are targetting the young. The young are one market segment, and also, changing. They don’t garden, but in 20 years time, they probably will. They drink exotic gins. In 20 years time, they’ll drink wine or port. Also, they no longer have the money like they did in the 80s. They’re struggling to get on the housing ladder, paying university debts.

    You might get a few people by targetting them, but you have to be realistic. I don’t know who the market is for the Brontes.

    The other thing is that it’s really stupid to think that “pretty supermodel” is all that young people are drawn to, especially the types of people who are into classic literature. There might be some young girls for whom someone pretty will draw them in, but they generally aren’t the bookish, literature heavy types. I know some young women who read Austen and Dickens and they aren’t like that, and would probably be the first people to question Ms Cole’s credentials.

  9. “…but it seems now that the council is being run along the lines of BBC farce W1A.”

    Not for the first time, the Left has looked at a satirical work of fiction and taken it for a blueprint. See also ‘1984’.

  10. The woman looks like a female “Chuckie” doll all growed up. On the outside at least.

  11. Half of our country has taken on the look of Munch’s The Scream since November 2016.

    The rest of us have that secretive half-smile of Mona Lisa.

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